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  1. #1
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    Default Packing 3-inch hose

    I'm an Engineer's ***. for an LDH engine company, volunteer, that runs with 3 to 5 FFs on average. At a recent fire, in an apartment complex, we initially rolled in to support the operation with a secondary water source. We set up a manifold, stretched 200 feet of 3-inch line to the fire, and utilized a 3-inch 3-way ball valve at the base of the fire, etc…
    The bed on the apparatus is split with 1200 feet of LDH and 500 feet of 3-inch hose. Now there were only three of us on the apparatus Engineer, Captain, and myself. The issue that I ran into was I had to pull off 200 feet of the 3 inch hose and snake it through the complex by myself. Since the bed is 12 feet long, I had a difficult time trying to shoulder and drag the hose.
    Is there any way to pack 3-inch hose so that you can shoulder at least 100 feet of hose before having to pull 12 foot lengths off the bed?
    Any help would be appreciated.
    Look before you cut.
    Rich (but poor)


  2. #2
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    Default

    How high is the hose bed and how is it currently loaded?

  3. #3
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    Just off the top of my head, how about two 250' triple loads? It would help to see your hosebed and to know what lengths of 3" you commonly need to use on the fireground to say for sure, but I'd bet some combination of triple loads will do the trick for you.

  4. #4
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    Default

    From what I take out of your description you carry 1200 feet of 5" (or 4") and 500' of 3" supply hose. If I understand, it is laid in the bed for supply, true? This being the case, in my opinion, your 3" would be best loaded flat with the female coupling on top. I would imagine you have this set up already. You would also want to consider keeping a 2 1/2" double male adapter connected to the 3" hose coupling so you can deploy it as an "attack" load as opposed to a "supply" load.

    To deploy this by yourself you need to offload it in "stages". I will try to explain this so it makes sense.

    Nobody can easily just grab the coupling and walk it out to the destination we have chosen, be it a hydrant or whatever.

    1. Take the coupling and if you can also grab the first fold of hose and walk it off the bed towards your destination. Walk 50 feet or so or until you have no more space to pull the line without turning or until it is too difficult to drag any further. Set the hose down and return to the tailboard

    2. Go back to the bed and grab the line that is coming off and at least one more layer (fold) of the hose and walk it out in the same direction. Drop this hose next to the coupling

    3. Repeat this process until you have what you estimate is the right amount of hose on the street. You should basically have a few zig-zags of hose laid out in the street in whatver distance you were able to pull the first amount of hose.

    4. Pick the female coupling back up and the first layer (fold) that you deployed and continue advancing towards your destination. Go back and grab the next fold and advance foward, go back and grab the next one etc.

    5.Repeat this process as you advance towards your destination.

    As you drag, try to shoulder the line and lean your weight into it using your leg muscles to do the work.

    Remember, just as in attack hose advancment around corners, stage hose slack just past the corner, dont try to pull the hose taught against and around obstructions, friction will kill you.

    The best way I can explain this is that you are pulling the estimated amount of hose off the bed, laying it in the street and making a makeshift hose bed or staging area or whatever you wanna call it. Now that you have laid the hose out you are going to deploy it just as though it was coming out of your bed, just picture your new pile as the bedand the end that is running from the tailboard is the coupling wrapped around the hydrant. Does this make any sense?

    Another option is to finish out the flat load with the last 100' in a horseshoe load on top. This way, you can grab the horseshoe load, shoulder it and deploy it. You wil end up having to drop the horseshoe load to go back for more hose if the distance is any more than 100-150 feet or so. With the horseshoe load, you might not have as smooth deployment as if it were flat loaded when you are dropping the line off the bed in a standard hose lay with the engine in motion.
    Last edited by MG3610; 03-15-2005 at 07:06 PM.

  5. #5
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    oldman21220

    About 8 feet.

    bobsnyder, MG3610,
    Outstanding, Thanks for the useful information I will try each of your recommendations. I appreciate the time you spent in responding.
    Look before you cut.
    Rich (but poor)

  6. #6
    Forum Member Dave1983's Avatar
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    We have 200' of 3" with a gated wye in one of our crosslays. Its flat loaded, with 150' down, then a loop and the other 50' on top. All you do is pull the loop out, which give you 50' and the wye on the shoulder. You can do the same with 150' down, then your loop and 100' on top for the shoulder.
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  7. #7
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    Default

    Oooops I re-read your question and your hosebed is from how I read it only 12 ft. long. Sounds like another engine making due with a poorly designed rig. I'm not sure there is really anything you can do, or would want to do. They give you absurd staffing and expecting you to stretch around the rig without someone to feed it around a bend...well there really isn't too many ways to do that quickly unless you make pre-assembled roll-ups. However that prevents you from paying it out as it goes.

    Earlier response
    The easiest method to pull 100 ft or 50 ft. or whatever is to determine how many folds you would have to grab to get lets say 50 ft. or even 100ft of 3" which honestly would be a bit much for one guy. But for my Engine 3 folds will get you 50 ft. You just need to measure the hose bed length to see how much you will get with one fold and make your calcuations based on that.


    FTM-PTB

    PS- The heads up thing to do would be to document this operation and its short commings and use it to argue for better staffing.
    Last edited by FFFRED; 04-01-2005 at 10:43 PM.

  8. #8
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    Lightbulb

    We just switched all of our 1.75" attack lines to a 150' triple layer with a horseshoe finish. This gets you 50' at the door and the rest off the truck quickly. This was done because of poor lay out of the hosebeds left us with few decent options. Our goal was a line one firefighter could pull without a tangled mess at the truck, and it had to clear the bed in minimal distance, oh and of course land at the door or floor with 50ft.With reduced staffing one firefighter can advance the 200' line to the objective fairly easily. Will this work with 3"? I'm not sure but any load finished with the amount you want (100' you said) in a horseshoe will get to where you're going.

  9. #9
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    Default Situtations vary

    Umm...not knowing local protocal on mutual aid and all, I just wonder (playing devil's advocate here) if having your second (or third) due apparatus bring in your line might have been a better option. With a 3ff company (which is pretty common) getting your initial lines and ground ladders placed for fire attack and possible rescue would definitely keep the first arriving trio very busy. But not knowing how far out your "second due" is, that is just a shot in the dark. Plus if any substantial voulme of fire was showing at all, in an apartment complex, a LDH would be MUCH better than a medium sized 3" supply. Better to have more than you need than to need more than you have!!






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