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Thread: Cribbing

  1. #1
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    Default Cribbing

    Does anybody have a list of the different styles and sizes of cribbing they carry? We are looking into getting a full set, possible making our own out of lumber due to budget constraints. Just wanderin. Thanks for the help.
    Matt Griffin
    Chief
    Eastern Chilton County Division of Fire, Rescue, and EMS, Station 91.


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    We have a ton of 4X4's and wedges, as well as step chocks and 6 prospan shores with the vehicle stabilization accessories.
    the 4X4's are 18", and I think the step chocks are from Ron's book.

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    What do you intend to crib? What are your typical responses?
    Developer and Sr. Presenter, Team Xtreme
    BIG RIG RESCUE

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    2X4'S, 4X4'S, 6X6'S, wedges, step chokes, tele-struts. All cribbing 20 in. long. We do keep a few 8 ft. lenghts of the 4x4's to cut to size as needed.

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    Try to stick with wood cribbing. I have ran into some problems with the plastic stuff. We carry both depending on which truck responds. We have step chocks, 4x4's, 2x4's, wedges.

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    Forum Member MetalMedic's Avatar
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    We have a combination of wood and plastic on our rig. I prefer the wood except for the step chocks. The wooden ones we had did not hold up well. The plastic ones I am much more confident with for the most part. We carry primarily 4x4x24 wood that a local lumber yard made for us from scraps of treated decking lumber. We also have 4x4x18 wedges as well as 6 and 8 foot 4x4 sections. We have four solid oak "plates that are 2x12x18 that we can use if we need to build a solid base for something.

    The plastic stuff we have is notched, so it appears like it will work well on level surfaces, but I have my doubts about how safe it would be on uneaven terrain. We have to do some more training with it before I am sold on it.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

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    I am trying to recall if we have used our plastic cribbing on an uneven surface. Even though the plastic cribbing is notched, it still has the tendency to slip on any paved surface. The wood cribbing seems to get a bite on the paved surface.

    Granted the plastic cribbing is easier to keep it clean, I just prefer the wood cribbing.

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    Forum Member Squad1LT's Avatar
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    I agree with the above:


    Wood Good
    Plastic Bad

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    Thumbs up I AGREE.

    Haha, let's see if you get your head bitten off by all the reps floating around here, like I often do!
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    20" cribbing? That could present a problem. For some really good Info on cribbing get a copy of Big Rig Rescue by Billy Leach jr. available thru AW Direct.Once you absorb the information in the book,you need to check in with Billy's friend Frank who has done EXTENSIVE research on the wood cribbing subject and offers some really neat "crib packs"that will stand some heavy duty loading.There is a whole lot more to the cribbing game than meets the eye. T.C. d

  11. #11
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    Thumbs up

    I agree with R101. There is a lot more than simply collecting and cutting wood!
    Developer and Sr. Presenter, Team Xtreme
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    Sorry guys been out of the loop over the weekened. Typical response would involve one or two motor vehicles but we do have a good bit of 18 wheelers that travel thru the area and we have a good bit of agriculture as well. Thanks for all the responses.
    Matt Griffin
    Chief
    Eastern Chilton County Division of Fire, Rescue, and EMS, Station 91.

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    Sorry guys been out of the loop over the weekened. Typical response would involve one or two motor vehicles but we do have a good bit of 18 wheelers that travel thru the area and we have a good bit of agriculture as well. Thanks for all the responses.
    Sounds alot like my response area. I belieive you can never have enough cribbing! But...I think you have to be selective.

    1. What will last
    2. What will be easier to maintain and replace
    3. What do we really need?
    4. Where will it all go?
    5. Don't rule out other devices such as air struts

    We carry the following (all wood)
    2 sets of step chocks
    15 6x6's 36" long
    15 4x4's 36" long
    10 4x4's 24" long
    8 8x8's 24" long
    3/4" plywood sheets cut to 3x3 sections
    Various wedges
    Air bags/1 set of paratec air struts/TNT tools etc...

    Works for us 95% of the time, but we do run into the other 5% calls which gets us thinking.

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    Forum Member fftrainer's Avatar
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    The plastic stuff we have is notched, so it appears like it will work well on level surfaces, but I have my doubts about how safe it would be on uneaven terrain. We have to do some more training with it before I am sold on it.
    The slip factor is the exact reason we have gone back to wood. We had made the switch to ALL plastic however we are now back to a combination of both wood and plastic. The plastic is good for direct straigt down pressure, but we had it slip on us twice in training sessions when there was a grade in the pavement.

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    Default Step chocks

    Can someone explain how to make wooden step chocks? Right now our FD uses 4x4's and a wedge to stabilze the car intially and I've thought about making some but I want to do it the right way.

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