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  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber StLRes2cue's Avatar
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    Default NAVY Recruiting Commercial

    Why isn't THIS the commercial the the Navy Recruiters run on TV?

    If I'd seen this in high school I might have joined!

    http://www.big-boys.com/articles/theairforcefun.html


  2. #2
    Forum Member DaSharkie's Avatar
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    I still think that the best job in the world is a Naval or Marine Aviator. Something about going from 0 to 200+ knots in 4 seconds and then ending the mission by going from 200 knots to knots in 1 second with the aircraft at throttle.

    Giddy up!
    "Too many people spend money they haven't earned, to buy things they don't want, to impress people they don't like." Will Rogers

    The borrower is slave to the lender. Proverbs 22:7 - Debt free since 10/5/2009.

    "No man's life, liberty, or property are safe while the legislature is in session." - New York Judge Gideon Tucker

    "As Americans we must always remember that we all have a common enemy, an enemy that is dangerous, powerful and relentless. I refer, of course, to the federal government." - Dave Barry

    www.daveramsey.com www.clarkhoward.com www.heritage.org

  3. #3
    Disillusioned Subscriber Steamer's Avatar
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    ...ending the mission by going from 200 knots to knots in 1 second with the aircraft at throttle.
    That just doesn't sound like there could be anything positive in that outcome.
    Steve Gallagher
    IACOJ BOT
    ----------------------------
    "I don't apologize for anything. When I make a mistake, I take the blame and go on from there." - Woody Hayes

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber ullrichk's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Steamer
    That just doesn't sound like there could be anything positive in that outcome.
    Surviving!
    ullrichk
    a.k.a.
    perfesser

    a ship in a harbor is safe. . . but that's not what ships are for

  5. #5
    Forum Member DaSharkie's Avatar
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    I saw a show (probably on the History Channel) that quoted a study performed during the Vietnam War using Naval and Marine Aviators that had several monitors and electrodes placed on them through an entire mission. Even through bomb runs on defended targets, SAM launches on their aircraft, and other incidents, the highest stress recorded was on approach to the carrier deck, especially at night.

    That just doesn't sound like there could be anything positive in that outcome.
    I knew several when I was in Pensacola, FL (where all Naval and Marine aviators are trained) and these were definitive type A personalities and were true thrill seekers.

    If my eyesight hadn't gone bad maybe things would have been different.
    "Too many people spend money they haven't earned, to buy things they don't want, to impress people they don't like." Will Rogers

    The borrower is slave to the lender. Proverbs 22:7 - Debt free since 10/5/2009.

    "No man's life, liberty, or property are safe while the legislature is in session." - New York Judge Gideon Tucker

    "As Americans we must always remember that we all have a common enemy, an enemy that is dangerous, powerful and relentless. I refer, of course, to the federal government." - Dave Barry

    www.daveramsey.com www.clarkhoward.com www.heritage.org

  6. #6
    Forum Member scfire86's Avatar
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    Subject: WANNA FLY?????? LET'S GO!!!!!!

    Below is an article written by Rick Reilly of Sports Illustrated. He details
    his experiences when given the opportunity to fly in a F-14 Tomcat. If you aren't laughing out loud by the time you get to "Milk Duds," your sense of humor is broken.

    "Now this message is for America's most famous athletes:


    Someday you may be invited to fly in the back-seat of one of your country's most powerful fighter jets. Many of you already have ... John Elway, John Stockton, Tiger Woods to name a few. If you get this opportunity, let me
    urge you, with the greatest sincerity...
    Move to Guam.
    Change your name.
    Fake your own death!
    Whatever you do ...
    Do Not Go!!!
    I know. The U.S. Navy invited me to try it. I was thrilled. I was pumped.
    I was toast! I should've known when they told me my pilot would be Chip (Biff) King of Fighter Squadron 213 at Naval Air Station Oceana in Virginia Beach.

    Whatever you're thinking a Top Gun named Chip (Biff) King looks like, triple it. He's about six-foot, tan, ice-blue eyes, wavy surfer hair, finger-crippling handshake -- the kind of man who wrestles dysleptic alligators in his leisure time. If you see this man, run the other way.
    Fast.

    Biff King was born to fly. His father, Jack King, was for years the voice of NASA missions. ("T-minus 15 seconds and counting ..." Remember?) Chip would charge neighborhood kids a quarter each to hear his dad. Jack would wake up from naps surrounded by nine-year-olds waiting for him to say, "We have a liftoff"

    Biff was to fly me in an F-14D Tomcat, a ridiculously powerful $60 million weapon with nearly as much thrust as weight, not unlike Colin Montgomerie. I was worried about getting airsick, so the night before the flight I asked Biff if there was something I should eat the next morning.

    "Bananas," he said.

    "For the potassium?" I asked.

    "No," Biff said, "because they taste about the same coming up as they do going down."

    The next morning, out on the tarmac, I had on my flight suit with my name sewn over the left breast. (No call sign -- like Crash or Sticky or Leadfoot ... but, still, very cool.) I carried my helmet in the crook of my arm, as Biff had instructed. If ever in my life I had a chance to nail Nicole Kidman, this was it.

    A fighter pilot named Psycho gave me a safety briefing and then fastened me into my ejection seat, which, when employed, would "egress" me out of the plane at such a velocity that I would be immediately knocked unconscious.

    Just as I was thinking about aborting the flight, the canopy closed over me, and Biff gave the ground crew a thumbs-up. In minutes we were firing nose up at 600 mph. We leveled out and then canopy-rolled over another F-14.


    Those 20 minutes were the rush of my life. Unfortunately, the ride lasted 80. It was like being on the roller coaster at Six Flags Over Hell. Only without rails. We did barrel rolls, snap rolls, loops, yanks and banks. We dived, rose and dived again, sometimes with a vertical velocity of 10,000 feet per minute. We chased another F-14, and it chased us.



    We broke the speed of sound. Sea was sky and sky was sea. Flying at 200 feet we did 90-degree turns at 550 mph, creating a G force of 6.5, which is to say I felt as if 6.5 times my body weight was smashing against me, thereby approximating life as Mrs. Colin Montgomerie.

    And I egressed the bananas. I egressed the pizza from the night before.

    And the lunch before that. I egressed a box of Milk Duds from the sixth grade. I made Linda Blair look polite. Because of the G's, I was egressing stuff that never thought would be egressed. I went through not one airsick bag, but two.

    Biff said I passed out. Twice. I was coated in sweat. At one point, as we were coming in upside down in a banked curve on a mock bombing target and the G's were flattening me like a tortilla and I was in and out of consciousness, I realized I was the first person in history to throw down.

    I used to know 'cool'. Cool was Elway throwing a touchdown pass, or Norman making a five-iron bite. But now I really know 'cool'. Cool is guys like Biff, men with cast-iron stomachs and freon nerves. I wouldn't go up there again for Derek Jeter's black book, but I'm glad Biff does every day, and for less a year than a rookie reliever makes in a home stand.

    A week later, when the spins finally stopped, Biff called. He said he and the fighters had the perfect call sign for me. Said he'd send it on a patch for my flight suit.

    What is it? I asked.

    "Two Bags."
    Last edited by scfire86; 07-05-2005 at 09:27 PM.
    Politics is like driving. To go forward select "D", to go backward select "R."

  7. #7
    Forum Member FDNY101TRUCK's Avatar
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    HAHA I knew there was a reason I signed up for the Navy...
    NEVER FORGET!
    9/11/01

  8. #8
    Forum Member FDNY101TRUCK's Avatar
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    Last edited by FDNY101TRUCK; 07-05-2005 at 09:40 PM.
    NEVER FORGET!
    9/11/01

  9. #9
    Forum Member scfire86's Avatar
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    Check this out. An R/C nut, but totally cool model.

    F14 Model
    Politics is like driving. To go forward select "D", to go backward select "R."

  10. #10
    Forum Member adamkhalil's Avatar
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    That is AWESOME, SC. He's crazy at flying it too -- that landing was perfect.


    I'm sure he has a girlfriend, he has very good RC flying skills (and anyone who's seen Napolean Dynomite knows girls love guys with skills)

  11. #11
    FH Mag/.com Contributor
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    Squadron 213 is the Fighting Black Lions, my cousin is a pilot with them.

    I have pictures around here somewhere from a flight he took with a Warrant Officer whose job it was to handle equipment or something which required him to ride in all of the types of aircraft. He asked the guy if he had ever been in the F-14, and the guy laughed it off and said let's go I know what I'm doing.

    In mid-flight, as part of the drill this guy said they needed to do, my cousin did some attack manuevers. As he was righting the plane, he hears this whooshing sound. The idiot got freaked because he had never been in an F-14D, never been inverted, and in his panic to grab on to something he grabbed the rear seat ejection handles and launched himself out.

    FYI: doing that causes $1 million worth of damage to a plane. Needless to say this guy's superiors were not really happy with him. When they picked him up from out in the middle of nowhere that is.

  12. #12
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    Originally posted by adamkhalil
    That is AWESOME, SC. He's crazy at flying it too -- that landing was perfect.


    I'm sure he has a girlfriend, he has very good RC flying skills (and anyone who's seen Napolean Dynomite knows girls love guys with skills)
    And not just any skills, GREAT skills. Does catching a delicious bass count as a great skill, or just dumb luck?

    Plus, the Liger had great skills, I wonder why it didn't have a girlfriend?

  13. #13
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    I saw this in an email from a friend.It had a picture of an F-14 waaaaay close to the flight deck angled so you could see what was on the cockpit deck.
    The caption also said that the pilot felt flying like that was well worth the 30 day grounding he received from his CO.


    Quote Originally Posted by scfire86
    Subject: WANNA FLY?????? LET'S GO!!!!!!

    Below is an article written by Rick Reilly of Sports Illustrated. He details
    his experiences when given the opportunity to fly in a F-14 Tomcat. If you aren't laughing out loud by the time you get to "Milk Duds," your sense of humor is broken.

    "Now this message is for America's most famous athletes:


    Someday you may be invited to fly in the back-seat of one of your country's most powerful fighter jets. Many of you already have ... John Elway, John Stockton, Tiger Woods to name a few. If you get this opportunity, let me
    urge you, with the greatest sincerity...
    Move to Guam.
    Change your name.
    Fake your own death!
    Whatever you do ...
    Do Not Go!!!
    I know. The U.S. Navy invited me to try it. I was thrilled. I was pumped.
    I was toast! I should've known when they told me my pilot would be Chip (Biff) King of Fighter Squadron 213 at Naval Air Station Oceana in Virginia Beach.

    Whatever you're thinking a Top Gun named Chip (Biff) King looks like, triple it. He's about six-foot, tan, ice-blue eyes, wavy surfer hair, finger-crippling handshake -- the kind of man who wrestles dysleptic alligators in his leisure time. If you see this man, run the other way.
    Fast.

    Biff King was born to fly. His father, Jack King, was for years the voice of NASA missions. ("T-minus 15 seconds and counting ..." Remember?) Chip would charge neighborhood kids a quarter each to hear his dad. Jack would wake up from naps surrounded by nine-year-olds waiting for him to say, "We have a liftoff"

    Biff was to fly me in an F-14D Tomcat, a ridiculously powerful $60 million weapon with nearly as much thrust as weight, not unlike Colin Montgomerie. I was worried about getting airsick, so the night before the flight I asked Biff if there was something I should eat the next morning.

    "Bananas," he said.

    "For the potassium?" I asked.

    "No," Biff said, "because they taste about the same coming up as they do going down."

    The next morning, out on the tarmac, I had on my flight suit with my name sewn over the left breast. (No call sign -- like Crash or Sticky or Leadfoot ... but, still, very cool.) I carried my helmet in the crook of my arm, as Biff had instructed. If ever in my life I had a chance to nail Nicole Kidman, this was it.

    A fighter pilot named Psycho gave me a safety briefing and then fastened me into my ejection seat, which, when employed, would "egress" me out of the plane at such a velocity that I would be immediately knocked unconscious.

    Just as I was thinking about aborting the flight, the canopy closed over me, and Biff gave the ground crew a thumbs-up. In minutes we were firing nose up at 600 mph. We leveled out and then canopy-rolled over another F-14.


    Those 20 minutes were the rush of my life. Unfortunately, the ride lasted 80. It was like being on the roller coaster at Six Flags Over Hell. Only without rails. We did barrel rolls, snap rolls, loops, yanks and banks. We dived, rose and dived again, sometimes with a vertical velocity of 10,000 feet per minute. We chased another F-14, and it chased us.



    We broke the speed of sound. Sea was sky and sky was sea. Flying at 200 feet we did 90-degree turns at 550 mph, creating a G force of 6.5, which is to say I felt as if 6.5 times my body weight was smashing against me, thereby approximating life as Mrs. Colin Montgomerie.

    And I egressed the bananas. I egressed the pizza from the night before.

    And the lunch before that. I egressed a box of Milk Duds from the sixth grade. I made Linda Blair look polite. Because of the G's, I was egressing stuff that never thought would be egressed. I went through not one airsick bag, but two.

    Biff said I passed out. Twice. I was coated in sweat. At one point, as we were coming in upside down in a banked curve on a mock bombing target and the G's were flattening me like a tortilla and I was in and out of consciousness, I realized I was the first person in history to throw down.

    I used to know 'cool'. Cool was Elway throwing a touchdown pass, or Norman making a five-iron bite. But now I really know 'cool'. Cool is guys like Biff, men with cast-iron stomachs and freon nerves. I wouldn't go up there again for Derek Jeter's black book, but I'm glad Biff does every day, and for less a year than a rookie reliever makes in a home stand.

    A week later, when the spins finally stopped, Biff called. He said he and the fighters had the perfect call sign for me. Said he'd send it on a patch for my flight suit.

    What is it? I asked.

    "Two Bags."

  14. #14
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    It makes me cringe when I see them doing that, knowing that in a few months that it will be my responsibilty when they f*ck up but in the mean time, i hope they get it out of their systems
    _____________
    David Bradley
    FF/SAR
    Round Mountan VFD

    GO NAVY!!

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