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  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    Default Only In Canada You Say, Eh?

    I am not so sure this was a great marketing idea....

    Caffeinated beer prompts MADD reaction

    CanWest News Service March 19, 2005

    OTTAWA -- Stacked with more buzz than a can of cola, caffeinated beers could cause a spike in deaths from drinking and driving, warn critics who say its rousing effects may give drinkers a false sense of sobriety and prompt them to get behind the wheel.

    With names such as Shok and Kick, Canada's first caffeine-laced brews are sure to provide that added jolt made famous by energy drinks like Red Bull and Bawls Guarana, a favourite with all-night video gamers.

    "The concern with this product is, will this encourage people who are already impaired to have another drink? Will it encourage people who are significantly impaired to get behind the wheel of a car?" said Robert Solomon, a law professor at the University of Ontario and director of legal policy for Mothers Against Drunk Driving. "It is a concern that we think ought to be explored before these products are introduced."

    Molson Kick hits stores across Canada Monday, packaged in aluminum-bottled four packs for "contemporary adults." Spiked with the Brazilian elixir guarana (derived from berries), the five per cent alcoholic drink offers 55 milligrams of caffeine per 355-millilitre bottle.

    Its competitor, Labatt Shok, arrives next month. A more potent concoction, Shok contains 60 milligrams of guarana-derived caffeine in a 250-millilitre bottle, with a bumped-up alcohol content of nearly seven per cent.

    A can of cola has 46 milligrams of caffeine, while a cup of fresh coffee contains 135. A normal beer has an alcohol content of about five per cent.

    Despite their new ingredient, neither Shok or Kick has fallen under increased scrutiny by Health Canada. Regulations apply only to foods or beverages that use caffeine in its original chemical form. Guarana, which contains caffeine, is considered a flavouring, meaning there are no limits on how much manufacturers can add to a product.

    "It may be a loophole but clearly, (with) the way the laws are currently written, it is legal to add guarana to foods," said Gerry Nixon, a national manager with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

    © Times Colonist (Victoria) 2005
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  2. #2
    Forum Member PFire23's Avatar
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    They're only marketing what people are already doing ....... mixing alcohol with Red Bull (which has VERY high levels of caffiene). I'm not saying it's right, but they are a business and they see a market.
    Last edited by PFire23; 03-19-2005 at 02:00 PM.
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