1. #1
    Forum Member

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    Apr 2005
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    Las Vegas,Nevada
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    1,012

    Lightbulb vehicle condition

    We think about seat belts and loose objects in the cab but lets take it to the next and most important level outside of what has been posted here. How is the mechanical condition of your units? It seems that I have heard a lot of stories with sad results regarding firefighters having and driving units that are not mechanically safe. Tkae Waterbury Connecticut and the latest in Kansas where firefighters were on units where brakes failed. Who is doing the maintenance and are they qualified to do it? Being on the service shop side of the picture it is my job to see that the emergency equipment our heroes drive, fight fires and save lives with is safe for them and the public they are here to protect. What say you? Is your equipment properly maintaned and safe for you and the public?

  2. #2
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    May 1999
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    Berks County, PA
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    629

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    In addition to our own monthly and post-use in-house maintenance checks, we contract with a nearby service provider specializing in fire apparatus maintenance. He comes in quarterly to give each rig a more in-depth check than we could, makes necessary general mechanical and electrical repairs, and takes care of the regular routine maintenance items (lubes, brake adjustments, oil changes, etc.). In addition, he gives us written assessments of larger issues he sees but can't handle and/or things that may cause long-term problems. These are then passed on to the appropriate apparatus dealer service center in the region for assessment and attention by someone equipped to handle them. In addition, our pumps are tested by an outside firm once a year, our ladders are tested by an outside firm once a year, our hose is tested in-house once a year, our SCBA are flow tested by an outside firm once a year, our air cylinders are hydro'ed by that same firm when needed, and they also service our cascade/compressor system per manufacturer guidelines.

    As an operator, it's a very nice feeling to know that the rig you're driving or pump you're operating is getting this kind of attention. And, I think it has saved us money in the long run, as potentially costly problems (particularly with pumps) have often been spotted early, when a simple repair probably saved us from much greater damage that would have resulted had the "little things" not been fixed. As a firefighter, it's also very nice to know critical equipment, like ladders and SCBA, is being tested regularly. I highly recommend it.
    Last edited by bobsnyder; 04-14-2005 at 01:41 PM.

  3. #3
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    Jul 2002
    Location
    Arizona
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    481

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    Our Chief just adopted an idea of mine. While each engineer is responsible for checking each truck after each run, that becomes "if it's everyone's job, it's no one's job."
    Now, each truck has one person assigned, to go over each truck in detail each month. So, now "THAT'S MY TRUCK"!

    As a small volly dept., it's hard to get all the checks done otherwise. Now, we all know that (for example) Chris is in charge of our tender: It's her truck!
    Last edited by Sleuth; 04-14-2005 at 04:11 PM.

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