1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    12

    Default How do you convince Management about RIT

    The question I have is, how do you covince a management group that says "If firefighters are trained to NFPA 1001 Standards" they should be able to get themselves out in an emergency, that the implementation of RIT teams is very necessary. If anyone has run in to this before and can help, PLEASE let me know how to tackle this.

  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    No. Providence R.I. : Land of the "How ya doins"
    Posts
    990

    Default

    Compile statistics, they can speak for themselves.
    "I have no ambition in this world but one, and that is to be a fireman. The position may, in the eyes of some, appear to be a lowly one; but we know the work which a fireman has to do believe that his is a noble calling."

    Edward F. Croker
    Chief 1899-1911
    Fire Dept. City of New York

    HOOK N' CAN of the I.A.C.O.J.

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    12

    Default

    tried that, and they said what i mentioned above.

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber
    dmleblanc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Not the end of the earth but I can see it from here...
    Posts
    2,318

    Default

    What the heck kind of reasoning is that? Might as well say, "Since everyone is trained to drive the apparatus safely, there should be no need for it to have seat belts". Why would any department NOT want to establish RIT teams? There's no good reason not to and a about a hundred new reasons every year why you should.....

    Better yet, if they want to play the standards game, remind them of NFPA 1500, Standard on Fire Department Occupational Safety and Health , which states....

    8.5 Rapid Intervention for Rescue of Members.
    8.5.1 The fire department shall provide personnel for the rescue of members operating at emergency incidents.
    8.5.2 A rapid intervention crew/company shall consist of at least two members and shall be available for rescue of a member or a crew.
    8.5.2.1 A rapid intervention crew/company shall be fully equipped with the appropriate protective clothing, protective equipment, SCBA, and any specialized rescue equipment that could be needed given the specifics of the operation under way.
    8.5.3 The composition and structure of a rapid intervention crew/company shall be permitted to be flexible based on the type of incident and the size and complexity of operations.
    8.5.4 The incident commander shall evaluate the situation and the risks to operating crews and shall provide one or more rapid intervention crew/company commensurate with the needs of the situation.
    8.5.5 In the early stages of an incident, which includes the deployment of a fire department's initial attack assignment, the rapid intervention crew/company shall be in compliance with 8.4.11 and 8.4.12 and be either one of the following:
    (1) On-scene members designated and dedicated as rapid intervention crew/company
    (2) On-scene members performing other functions but ready to re-deploy to perform rapid intervention crew/company functions
    8.5.5.1 The assignment of any personnel shall not be permitted as members of the rapid intervention crew/company if abandoning their critical task(s) to perform rescue clearly jeopardizes the safety and health of any member operating at the incident.
    8.5.6 As the incident expands in size or complexity, which includes an incident commander's requests for additional resources beyond a fire department's initial attack assignment, the dedicated rapid intervention crew/company shall on arrival of these additional resources be either one of the following:
    (1) On-scene members designated and dedicated as rapid intervention crew/company
    (2) On-scene crew/company or crews/companies located for rapid deployment and dedicated as rapid intervention crews
    8.5.6.1 During fire fighter rescue operations each crew/company shall remain intact.
    8.5.7 At least one dedicated rapid intervention crew/company shall be standing by with equipment to provide for the rescue of members that are performing special operations or for members that are in positions that present an immediate danger of injury in the event of equipment failure or collapse.


    If they claim that your department operates by NFPA standards, they really can't argue with this one....
    Last edited by dmleblanc; 04-18-2005 at 05:10 AM.
    Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
    Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
    Paincourtville, LA

    "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream and I hope you don't find this too crazy is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
    C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    12

    Default

    You're right, that's no kind of reasoning. Upper management seems to be more interested in starting HUSAR & CBRN teams, than looking after there own members first with R.I.T. teams. I know that there is interested members from the stations around me who want to set up R.I.T. So mabye we'll set up our own teams without the help of upper management.

  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber
    dmleblanc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Not the end of the earth but I can see it from here...
    Posts
    2,318

    Default

    Maybe I misunderstood the question...are you looking to establish a formal, regional RIT team, or just incorporate RIT into your fireground operations?

    Teams like USAR or HazMat tend to need a formally organized team and are generally made up of members from across a region who get mobilized only for those types of emergencies. Because of the specialized training and equipment involved, this type of team does need to be set up in advance, funded, equipped, etc.

    A RIT team, on the other hand, is usually staffed from the personnel already responding to an incident, or perhaps from one company or station designated to act as RIT for that incident or for that area. RIT operations involve some specialized training, but generally utilize the skills and tools available to the average engine or truck company. It really should only be a matter of doing some in-house training on techniques, ensuring that all members are familiar with the process, then assign a RIT team from the resources you have available at the scene. Is that what you're looking for approval of, or are you trying to put together something bigger?
    Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
    Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
    Paincourtville, LA

    "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream and I hope you don't find this too crazy is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
    C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    3

    Default RIC Definitions

    I wish RIC/RIT was somewhat more defined such as:

    IRIC - Initial Rapid Intervention Crew - Two-In Two-Out for OSHA

    RIC - A two Person Crew

    RIT - A four Person Crew

    FAST - A Six Person Crew

    Just a thought.

  8. #8
    Forum Member
    Maverick9110E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    OakRidge,NJ
    Posts
    366

    Default

    im also interested in how to get the higher ups to say that we can get a formal rit/fast team together. Where im located we usually call different departments that we know have RIT training and a specific RIT crew. and currently our closest one is about 8-10 miles away. what kind of training besides a Firefighter Assistant and Search Team class would we need? whats the best way to set up these kind of things? The couple of guys we have interested in this all agree that our ladder truck would be the perfect truck to use when we get called out because it has a lot of SAR tools and the usuall truck company equipment.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register