Thread: Cpr

  1. #1
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    Default Cpr

    Anyone have access to any medical studies or reports on this ?!?!?




    TUCSON, Ariz. - Each year, 600,000 people die in the United States when their heart suddenly stops beating and professional help does not arrive in time. That's why for 40 years the Red Cross and the American Heart Association have been teaching citizens to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with a combination of 15 chest compressions then two breaths in the mouth.

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    But Dr. Gorden Ewy is out to prove that CPR as it is done now is a gigantic failure.

    "What's at stake?" asks Ewy, director of the Sarver Heart Center at the University of Arizona. "Thousands of people's lives. Doing it right, advancing medicine. I mean, what's medicine all about?"

    Ewy says the big problem with CPR as it is currently practiced is those breaths to the mouth, which interrupt chest compressions. During that interruption, he says, the critical flow of blood to the brain also gets interrupted.

    And more important, surveys show most people won't blow into a stranger's mouth.

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    What's the right way to perform CPR? Ewy says it is simple, continuous chest compression 100 times a minute with no breaths.

    Ewy has convinced the city of Tucson, Ariz., to start teaching classes with his new method. He not only persuaded the public in Tucson, he also convinced the fire department and the paramedics that his was the right way to do CPR.

    "The paramedics in the field are reporting that it's an easier way to resuscitate code arrests and they are seeing a lot better response from the patients," saysJoe Gulotta, deputy chief of the Tucson Fire Department.

    So far, the Red Cross and American Heart Association are staying with the old method.

    "You know, there's a huge investment of 40 years of doing it that way," says Ewy. But he believes the world will eventually see things his way, and save a lot of lives.
    Troutville Volunteer Fire Department
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    I saw the same/similar article but haven't seen any support or denial. As an instructor for both ARC & AHA I am definitely awaiting any replies from them.
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    The newest version of the Medical Priority Dispatch cards now has changes to it. Basically it gives people the option to do breaths or not....... Also has instructions for doing 400 compressions at a time or 100 at a a time
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    Default Does this apply 2 person?

    Does this apply if you have an additional resource to take care of breaths while compressions are performed by the primary caregiver? I've heard of the study I think from NewsWeek, but I don't remember much of the article...

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    I would like to see the results of any research into this. if you do not give any breaths surely all you will be pumping around the body is de-oxygenated blood with high levels of carbon dioxide (not good for the body). if we do not breathe our heart would stop, if our heart stops we do not breathe. something just doesn't sound right if you ask me

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    Default CPR article

    I downloaded this article a couple of months ago. I edited for space, but I didn't remove any information.

    CPR is often performed inadequately by doctors, paramedics and nurses, according to two studies of resuscitation efforts during cardiac arrest.

    Whether a stricken patient is in the hospital or on the way, the guidelines for administering cardiopulmonary resuscitation frequently are not followed.

    Among the problems commonly cited: Rescuers did not push hard enough or frequently enough on the victim's chest to restart the heart, and breathed air into the lungs too often either mouth-to-mouth or through breathing tubes.

    Both studies used an experimental monitor that assesses CPR quality, and both received funding from Laerdal Medical Corp., a Norwegian company that developed the device with Philips Medical Systems.

    The studies appear in Wednesday's Journal of the American Medical Association.

    The researchers explained that skills learned in the classroom can fall by the wayside in the stress-filled chaos of a real-life emergency. Also, they noted that chest compressions strong enough to break ribs are sometimes required, and rescuers can tire quickly.

    In one of the studies, involving 67 adult patients at the University of Chicago, doctors and nurses failed to follow at least one CPR guideline 80 percent of the time. Failure to follow several guidelines was common.

    "Patients who had it perfectly done were in the distinct minority," said Dr. Benjamin Abella, one of the researchers.

    The other study involved 176 adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated by paramedics and nurse anesthetists in Stockholm, Sweden; Akershus, Norway; and London. Chest compressions were done only half the time, and most were too shallow.

    More than 600,000 people die from sudden cardiac arrest each year in North America and Europe. The heart suddenly stops beating, either because of a heart attack or other underlying heart disease.

    The combination heart monitor and defibrillator used in the studies includes a small sensor that attaches to the patient's chest and evaluates depth of chest compressions and other aspects of CPR. The monitor includes an automated voice that provides on-the-spot coaching, telling rescuers when chest compressions are not strong enough or frequent enough. But that feature was not used during the studies.

    Both studies were too small to determine whether using the device saved lives, but the Chicago researchers said it could improve patients' survival chances.

    "Without a device that gives you feedback in the heat of the moment, you can't drive an airplane that way and we can't take care of sick critical patients without the appropriate monitors," said the study's leader, Dr. Lance Becker, director of the university's emergency resuscitation research center.

    The device is approved for experimental use in the United States, and the manufacturer is seeking Food and Drug Administration permission to sell it commercially in this country.

    While other studies have found CPR techniques lacking, the JAMA studies are the first using a monitor to evaluate "what's going on during real cardiac arrests and in real people," said American Heart Association spokesman Vinay Nadkarni. "It's outstanding information."

    The studies will be taken up at a medical conference next week in Dallas that could lead to an update of the CPR guidelines, Nadkarni said.

    The studies add to evidence that the guidelines need to be simplified so that they "can be readily used in the real world," Drs. Gordon Ewy and Arthur Sanders, emergency medicine specialists at the University of Arizona, said in an accompanying editorial.
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    I have yet to do cpr where I have not broken ribs. most of them survived. I had one guy that had a perfect palm print in his chest. when i started cpr on him I just had to put my hand over the print the other medic made. I think the key to the patients survial is early defibrilation

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    OR MAYBE the concern should be AED's and the lack of in many places...

    If I had to pick between paying to get everyone retrainied for a new way to do CPR, and spending the $$ (or time that could be spent raising the $$) to buy an AED...I think I'd pick the latter...
    Last edited by Co11FireGal; 04-27-2005 at 09:11 PM.
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    My Department has 1 AED and it paid for itself the first day we put it into the rescue truck. our first call was for a heart attack and with the help of the AED he is walking around today. all the police vehicles in my county also have AED's

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    Any information i have found is the patient does get oxygen from the negative pressure from the compressions, I have heard some people say you just put the patient on a NRB and do compressions but I have only heard like word of mouth information.

    I believe alot of colleges are doing studies on it but not many people are talking. Anyone else found any info?
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    Originally posted by pengman
    if you do not give any breaths surely all you will be pumping around the body is de-oxygenated blood with high levels of carbon dioxide (not good for the body).
    Actually, American Heart is already teaching that a person does not have to give mouth-to-mouth if they aren't comfortable doing so. Chest compressions alone are enough to move some air in and out of the patient (when you come up on a compression, the lungs expand and take in air).

    Also, I've heard that continual compressions builds the blood pressure in the body and improves blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Supposedly, by stopping compressions to give breaths... we're allowing the pressure we built up to drop.

  12. #12
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    Originally posted by Co11FireGal
    OR MAYBE the concern should be AED's and the lack of in many places...

    If I had to pick between paying to get everyone retrainied for a new way to do CPR, and spending the $$ (or time that could be spent raising the $$) to buy an AED...I think I'd pick the latter...
    Amen, I have CPR rates have changed many times headline should be
    BUY AED's

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    Will have to keep an eye out for future informaton about this.
    A "Good" fire is not measured by how big it is, but by the fact that everyone is going home safe, and that we possibly learned something new about firefighting. Member:IACOJ

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    Seems like with this information coming out ( and i haven't seen the stats only heard of them) someone would take some time to do more research or make this a big issue, I am sure if it is true it will be alot easier to get people to try CPR since some are reluctant now because of Mouth to Mouth
    Troutville Volunteer Fire Department
    www.tvfd.org

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    Originally posted by Co11FireGal
    OR MAYBE the concern should be AED's and the lack of in many places...

    If I had to pick between paying to get everyone retrainied for a new way to do CPR, and spending the $$ (or time that could be spent raising the $$) to buy an AED...I think I'd pick the latter...
    I agree. more departments should apply for the grants tht were mentioned here on firehouse.com

    The AED Superstore and Defibtech Fund AED Grant Program


    WIRELESS NEWS-10 April 2005-The AED Superstore and Defibtech Fund AED Grant Program 2005 10Meters - http://www.10meters.com

    The AED Superstore, a source of automated external defibrillators (AEDs), and Defibtech, a manufacturer of automated external defibrillators, have announced a partnership to offer free LifeLine AEDs to selected fire agencies across the United States through a private grant.

    Both firms are funding and administering the program.

    "We committed ourselves to this program after learning that about half of all on duty firefighter casualties are the result of cardiac arrest or heart attack at the fire scene," said AED Superstore National Sales Director Jonathan Dobbs. The latest data from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) confirms these figures. "By donating AEDs, we're giving fire departments a tool they can use to save the life of a fellow firefighter at the most critical moment. AEDs should be standard equipment on every engine like turnout gear and SCBA."

    Awards will consist of Defibtech LifeLine AEDs, five-year battery pack, adult electrode pads, training and orientation video, user manual, rescue kit, five-year manufacturer's warranty, doctor's prescription, and AED Check Tag. All award AEDs will be shipped free-of charge, the groups noted.

    "We are excited to be participating in this very important grant program," said Defibtech President Gintaras Vaisnys. "We are pleased to see that our easy to use and rugged AEDs are being deployed throughout the country and will be protecting not only the public but will be saving the lives of firefighters as well."

    The AED Superstore and Defibtech said that all municipal, county, state, and federal fire agencies are eligible to apply including volunteer, paid-on-call, career, and combination fire departments. Private and "for profit" concerns are not eligible.

    The AED Superstore is a privately held subsidiary of Allied 100, of Wisconsin.

    Grant application: http://www.AEDsForLife.org.

    (Comments on this story may be sent to newsdesk@10meters.com)

    (Distributed via M2 Communications Ltd - http://www.m2.com)

    April 11, 2005

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