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  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber pvfire424's Avatar
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    Default Ladder rescue techniques

    Over the weekend, the class I am in (Fire I & II) did our ladder rescues practicals. And I am looking for tips, or techniques that other use for this skill.

    Situation: "unconscious" firefighter, two story building, 3 section extention ladder, victim facing you.

    What are your ideas ?


  2. #2
    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
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    Have another FF assist you in getting the guy on the ladder. Put his legs over your shoulders and slowly climb down the ladder. If he starts to wake or move, you can pull yourself against the ladder and it will pin him into it.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    MembersZone Subscriber SteveDude's Avatar
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    I'll go for that....In London, we always used to practice live 'carry downs' as part of our Training... the good old 'Fireman's carry'...That is fine for a light casualty or a child, but even without thinking to deeply, a heavy casualty will be a lot better supported with the majority of weight taken by the ladder.

    We have stopped the old carry down training now as even in Rescues it was rarely used... I'll go for Bones Option all day long.
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    Forum Member DennisTheMenace's Avatar
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    Is anyone teaching anything other then what Bones advocated?
    Be for Peace, but don't be for the Enemy!
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    Quote Originally Posted by nyckftbl View Post
    LOL....dont you people have anything else to do besides b*tch about our b*tching?

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    MembersZone Subscriber pvfire424's Avatar
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    Actually yes,

    For our class, the curriculum is : Victim will be lowered from knee to knee. (whne you step down , victim is lowered to next bent leg , so on) Basically the victim is sitting on recuer's knee facing the rescuer.

    Did that make sense, IF not I should have some pics from this weekend later on tonight.

  6. #6
    Forum Member DennisTheMenace's Avatar
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    Originally posted by pvfire424
    Actually yes,

    For our class, the curriculum is : Victim will be lowered from knee to knee. (whne you step down , victim is lowered to next bent leg , so on) Basically the victim is sitting on recuer's knee facing the rescuer.

    Did that make sense, IF not I should have some pics from this weekend later on tonight.
    That sounds like un-needed strain on the rescuer.
    Be for Peace, but don't be for the Enemy!
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    Learn from the mistakes of others; you won't live long enough to make them all yourself.

    Quote Originally Posted by nyckftbl View Post
    LOL....dont you people have anything else to do besides b*tch about our b*tching?

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    MembersZone Subscriber pvfire424's Avatar
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    And that is why I asked for ideas.

    I didnt have a problem with it , as I have plenty of reach to hold the sides of the ladder. But there were several folks who had a very difficult time with the drill, as they need to grab the rungs of the ladder. Biggest problem there is, victims coat was typically in the way.

  8. #8
    Forum Member Dave1983's Avatar
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    Originally posted by DennisTheMenace
    Is anyone teaching anything other then what Bones advocated?
    Yes, as well as the knee-knee method.
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  9. #9
    FIGJAM lutan1's Avatar
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    What about a ladder slide? Package them into a stokes litter or similar and place a rope at the top to lower them and a couple of guiding ropes from the bottom. All set up and lowered in a few minutes....
    Luke

  10. #10
    MembersZone Subscriber pvfire424's Avatar
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    I would agree with the stokes lower scenario. But this was a scenario where there really isnt time to "package" a victim, rather get down the ladder now if not sooner.

  11. #11
    MembersZone Subscriber Halligan84's Avatar
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    Quick haul

    Get at least one firefighter in the window using the ladder or utilize a firefighter already with the downed firefighter.

    Raise the ladder above the window

    Attach a length of rope equipped with a pulley and carabiners and pass it in the window. We attach the rope with a carabiner on the highest rung and pass a pulley and carabiner into the victim. Convert the scba to a harness and clip on the shoulder straps. Either use a second carabiner or pass the lower end of the rope and bag over a lower rung and to the ground. Firefighters, cops, civilians.. whatever you can muster haul the firefighter up out of the window and lower to the ground.

    In training this SIGNIFICANTLY lowered the "to the ground" time. In a pinch just a single length of rope passed over a high rung will work with enough people on the ground to pull. We did quite a bit of training on the Denver Drill and found that factors such as victim size, room/window layout and rescuer ability left too much of a variance. We keep the kits bagged up and ready to go on the rescue and truck and they can be put together for less than $150 if you can't scrounge up the equipment from around the station.

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    If you want to learn some of the newest, and IMHO the best, ladder rescue techniques, take a Saving Our Own class. One I can remember well that no one has mentioned is that you have a down f/f or victime, you pass them out the window head first to a waiting f/f on a ladder. You put there head above you arm so they are kind of have their head on your arm. You then put your other arm through there legs. I cant remember at this time if you lower their head or legs, but im pretty sure its there legs, and you proceed down the ladder. I think its the legs that are lower cause it makes for an easier hand off at the bottom. I also like the head first ladder bail if you have to get yourself out fast. If you are going to practice make sure you know what ur doing or you have a rope attached to you just in case. We had our instructor on a ladder next to us and we were on a rope. It is a good technique though
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    Forum Member firenresq77's Avatar
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    I disagree with the ladder bails......... They suck...... Give me a bail-out bag and I'm happy......
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    We trained with both the knee-knee rescue and the legs over the shoulder technique. Depending on the size of the victim usually depends on which one works best. When rescuing a firefigfhter their gear does tend to get caught up in the ladder.

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    Forum Member jerrygarcia's Avatar
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    Originally posted by pvfire424
    Actually yes,

    For our class, the curriculum is : Victim will be lowered from knee to knee. (whne you step down , victim is lowered to next bent leg , so on) Basically the victim is sitting on recuer's knee facing the rescuer.

    Did that make sense, IF not I should have some pics from this weekend later on tonight.
    Ditto, that's the way I learned it and train on.


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    MembersZone Subscriber mcaldwell's Avatar
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    We train the three techniqus mentioned.

    1. Legs over shoulders.
    2. Knee to Knee technique.
    3. Left arm under armpit, right arm between legs. Head raised.

    With the last one, it is better to go under the armpit than to try to support them by the neck. This one is actually pretty easy, and gives good support and balance. I personally prefer the legs over shoulder technique though. The Knee to Knee can be rough on the pt.
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  17. #17
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    We were taught to either have them on one knee, or having them sideways, one arm between their legs, and the other under their arm.
    -Bozz

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    Originally posted by mcaldwell
    We train the three techniqus mentioned.

    1. Legs over shoulders.
    2. Knee to Knee technique.
    3. Left arm under armpit, right arm between legs. Head raised.

    All three of these are discussed in the IFSTA Essentials, and we would accept any of the three (if done correctly and safely, of course) when evaluating this station on a FF-I test. I personally like #3, simply because I think it's the easiest on both the rescuer and the victim overall and I don't like the high center of gravity you seem to have with the legs over shoulders method (maybe it's just in my head...but that counts on the street too). The knee-to-knee is really hard on the patient...I've been used as the "dummy" to demo that one on occasion (for just a few rungs and close to the ground) and I can assure you of that from experience.

  19. #19
    MembersZone Subscriber sbfdco1's Avatar
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    We too have trained on the various ways of bringing a firefighter/victim down a ladder. In addition to getting the victim/ff down the ladder you need to get them through the window first. How many departments train in the Denver Escape Technique?

    Denver Escape Technique
    1. Applications
    a. Move a downed firefighter
    2. Use as part of a RIT company
    3. Get a downed FF from the floor, to personnel on the outside of a window.
    4. Method
    a. Minimum two person RIT team with tools.
    5. Find the downed firefighter.
    6. Find the point of escape
    7. Communicate with the FF
    a. Get the downed FF to the window of escape.
    8. FF #1 positions himself on wall below window with back against the wall.
    9. Pull knees to chest to form a ramp
    10. With assistance of FF #2, pull the downed FF so he is sitting in front of FF #1. Downed FF should be sitting the same way as FF #1.
    11. Working as a team, lift the downed FF to the personnel in the window.
    12. FF #2 grabs the downed FF underneath the knees.
    13. FF #1 puts his hands on the rear end and pushes straight up.
    14. Work as a team. ie. 1, 2, 3 lift.
    15. First movement to top of knees, second into window.

    As mention above, performing a high angle rescue using the ladder a high point. In addition to creating a three point harness with the scba, you can also us a Hasty Harness using a piece of webbing.
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