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    Default How much water does a 50' fire hose hold?

    I know this might seem like a basic question but I cannot find a formula to figure how much water is contained in a 50 foot section of 1.5, 1.75, 2.5, and 3 inch hose. Can anyone supply me with this info?

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    I'm fairly certain that when it's dried and rolled that it contains no water.
    Does this help?

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    Area of a circle times length of hose (make sure you convert 50 ft to inches). Find a conversion factor for gallons of water to cubic inches and you have it.
    ullrichk
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    I believe there are 231 cubic inches in a gallon. I hope this helps.

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    Default 4.6 gallons

    I used the numbers in this post for this calculation (they seem reasonable to me). Please correct if I've made an error.

    1.5" diameter hose has a radius of .75"
    Pie= 3.142
    50' = 600 inches
    1 gallon = 231 cubic inches

    area of a circle= pie*rsquared
    =3.142*(.75*.75)
    =1.767
    volume= area* height (in this case length)

    = 1.767*(50*12)
    =1060.2 cubic inches
    divided by ci per gallon (231)
    =1060.2/231
    =4.589 gallons in a 50' 1.5" hose full of water.
    Last edited by rualfire; 05-09-2005 at 01:29 PM.

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    If you really want to throw a wrench in the wringer, consider that your hose will expand in diameter under pressure. . .
    ullrichk
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    Originally posted by ullrichk
    Area of a circle times length of hose (make sure you convert 50 ft to inches).
    ...otherwise known as the "volume of a cylinder"...

    Sorry...couldn't resist...I'll stop nit-picking now...


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    Originally posted by bobsnyder


    ...otherwise known as the "volume of a cylinder"...

    Sorry...couldn't resist...I'll stop nit-picking now...

    Hey, cut me some slack! I was doing the Readers' Digest version of the formula with an explanation.

    (So much for brevity!)
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    Found these old notes. Multiplication factors are from charts. Weight of 100" foot lines is before adding in hose and nozzle.

    1 100 x .0918= 9.18 gallons 9.18 x 8.34= 76.56 lbs.
    1 100 x .1249= 12.5 gallons 12.49 x 8.34= 104.16 lbs.
    2 100 x .1632= 16.32 gallons 16.32 x 8.34= 136.11 lbs
    2 100 x .2550= 25.50 gallons 25.50 x 8.34= 212.67 lbs.
    3 100 x .3672= 36.72 gallons 36.72 x 8.34= 306.24 lbs.
    4 100 x .6528= 65.28 gallons 65.28 x 8.34= 544.44 lbs

    Ever think you were dragging around this much weight?
    Last edited by R1SAlum; 05-29-2005 at 07:31 PM.

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    To simplify the calculation use:

    V = 0.04078 (d^2) (L)

    V = Volume in Gallons
    d = Hose diameter in inches
    L = Hose length in feet
    Note: d^2 = d squared

    This saves numerous steps the possibility of skipping one of the conversions.

    If you are interested in the weight, use:

    W = 0.3397 (d^2) (L)

    W = Weight of water in pounds

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    Originally posted by R1SAlum
    Found these old notes. Multiplication factors are from charts. Weight of 100" foot lines is before adding in hose and nozzle.

    1 100 x .0918= 9.18 gallons 9.18 x 8.34= 76.56 lbs.
    1 100 x .1249= 12.5 gallons 12.49 x 8.34= 65.92 lbs.
    2 100 x .1632= 16.32 gallons 16.32 x 8.34= 136.11 lbs
    2 100 x .2550= 25.50 gallons 25.50 x 8.34= 212.67 lbs.
    3 100 x .3672= 36.72 gallons 36.72 x 8.34= 306.24 lbs.
    4 100 x .6528= 65.28 gallons 65.28 x 8.34= 544.44 lbs

    Ever think you were dragging around this much weight?


    what no 5"?

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    Check your math on the 1 3/4". I would but I am missing a couple of toes.

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    You're right Herb, thanks. I corrected it.

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    Default Re: How much water does a 50' fire hose hold?

    Originally posted by redtrucks
    I know this might seem like a basic question but I cannot find a formula to figure how much water is contained in a 50 foot section of 1.5, 1.75, 2.5, and 3 inch hose. Can anyone supply me with this info?
    About 50 feet of water....
    Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
    Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
    Paincourtville, LA

    "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream and I hope you don't find this too crazy is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
    C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

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