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  1. #1
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    Default Cotton Hose and Mildew

    Is there any chemical that can be applied to new cotton hose to prevent mildew so that it can be loaded wet? We obtained a good supply of untreated double-jacketed cotton hose but we were hoping that there was some way to make it mildew resistant. Anybody have any ideas? I couldn't find anything pertinent on a forum search. Thanks!


  2. #2
    Forum Member MemphisE34a's Avatar
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    I seriously doubt that you have cotton hose. Most non-rubberized fire hose manufactured today is made out of polyester and IS therefore mildew safe. It will still mildew, but will not deterioriate the hose. Old school guys still call this stuff cotton hose, but it is not.

    Check and see what you actually have.
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  3. #3
    Forum Member Dave1983's Avatar
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    Originally posted by MemphisE34a
    I seriously doubt that you have cotton hose. Most non-rubberized fire hose manufactured today is made out of polyester and IS therefore mildew safe. It will still mildew, but will not deterioriate the hose. Old school guys still call this stuff cotton hose, but it is not.

    Check and see what you actually have.
    Thats what I thought. I havent seen any new cotton hose in years.
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  4. #4
    55 Years & Still Rolling hwoods's Avatar
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    Smile Huh?.................

    We started phasing out cotton hose back when I started in the Fire Service IN 1958!!. I haven't seen cotton hose on anything, except Antique apparatus that is no longer in service, since the 1970's in this area. Is Cotton hose still being made? I have no idea, but I hope not. Back to the question at hand. I don't know of anything to thwart mildew directly, but here's my thoughts: Change your hose load twice a year. Lay the hose out, replace it with fresh hose, and hang the hose that came off the rig up to dry. When placing hose back on the rig, take care not to allow old folds to reform in the same spot. Any time the hose is used, it should be washed and hung and dried. Anyone else with cotton hose experience, please jump in and correct me if needed.
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Cotton Hose and Mildew

    Originally posted by vfddoc
    Is there any chemical that can be applied to new cotton hose to prevent mildew so that it can be loaded wet? We obtained a good supply of untreated double-jacketed cotton hose but we were hoping that there was some way to make it mildew resistant. Anybody have any ideas? I couldn't find anything pertinent on a forum search. Thanks!
    Why would you re rack wet hose???????? The smell alone would drive me nuts. We have loaded damp hose (JUST ON THE TOP LAY) and let in dry with the tarp off - if its wet, just hang it, zig zag it on the floor - but make sure it is dry!

    Yuck - I hate it when my hose gets moldy!
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  6. #6
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    Default

    You guys are correct, it is polyester. I am told that it is "untreated polyester". Will that make a difference? I am curious to know what benefit you get from the extra cost of "treating" if it still can't be loaded wet.. Thanks! Doc

  7. #7
    District Chief distchief60b's Avatar
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    NEIDNER makes a synthetic jacketed hose that is mildew and mold resistant and is able to be repacked wet. It is also treated with something called ENCAP to help this resistance.
    09-11 .. 343 "All Gave Some..Some Gave ALL" God Bless..R.I.P.
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  8. #8
    Forum Member CaptOldTimer's Avatar
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    Exclamation

    Most of the synthetic jacketed hose, nylon-rayon fibers will hold up better if the fibers (hose jackets) are impregnated with a coating such as Hypalon or other suitable coating. This keeps the fibers from abrading and keeps the mold and mildew down. Most can be washed off, swept and repacked on the street. Only hose lines that have came in contact with a fuel product, Gasoline, Fuel Oil or other stuff, needs to taken back to the house and washed and retested.

    The natural coloring is white. That is why you see different colors, Red, Yellow, Orange, Blue, Green, etc. these all has been treated.

    Ask your dealer where you are buying your hose line from about having your hose lines coated at the factory. Be sure that you state this, to be done, in the hose specifications.
    Stay Safe and Well Out There....

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