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  1. #61
    FossilMedic
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    metro Washingon DC
    Posts
    526

    Default PG EMS workload

    Let me amplify the Division Chief's comments:

    In 1999 PGFD was seeking legislative assistance to require an increase in the number and level of training for health care staff working in nursing homes, assisted and extended care facilities. It was also requesting help in closing down undocumented healthcare facilities.

    Almost one-third of PGFD ems responses were to nursing homes, assisted living and extended care facilities. In many cases between 1700 and 0800 hours it was because the one on-duty licensed practical nurse (with scant skills in the English language) was calling 9-1-1 because there was no one else at the facility with any medical training.

    PGFD EMS (career and volunteer) becomes the unwilling partner at fixed facility care facilities that are understaffed with undertrained and underskilled caregivers. When in doubt, call 9-1-1.

    Policies in the better staffed facilities also create excessive ems workload. One national extended care facility has a policy that every unwitnessed fall of a patron REQUIRES a 9-1-1 call and evaluation. So when a resident slips off a chair and sits on a carpeted floor - EMS is called. In nearby Fairfax County, one of these facilities generates 7 to 15 calls a week.

    This situation is not unique for PG. In *MY* opinion PG county does not have enough staffed transport units to meet it's workload. Many ALS incidents do not get a paramedic and Tillerman's experience waiting for a second to sixth due basic ambulance is not unique. That is why a former PGFD fire chief went to the Emergency Rescue Technician career positions in place of the Firefigher positions.

    Mike

    former EMS subcommittee chair
    Fire Chief's Committee
    Washington Metro Council of Governments
    Last edited by MikeWard; 06-10-2005 at 04:08 PM.


  2. #62
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Tillerman25-

    Here is the reality. We provide BLS first response service to all of our first due area. We provide at the same level as the BLS ambulances that are also responding. We are able to do this and clear when the BLS unit gets there and no longer requires our assistance, which then leaves us availible for more calls in our first due.
    Please tell me how this is not serving our area? It seems as though having a BLS ambulance would actually HURT our service. We respond quickly, efficently and many times with members that area actually paramedics at their other jobs.

    Now having a paramedic unit (either fire engine or transport) in our fire house is another story entirely.

    Care to comment?
    Last edited by blankfireman; 06-10-2005 at 10:02 PM.

  3. #63
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Puget Sound
    Posts
    130

    Default Re: PG EMS workload

    Originally posted by MikeWard
    Policies in the better staffed facilities also create excessive ems workload. One national extended care facility has a policy that every unwitnessed fall of a patron REQUIRES a 9-1-1 call and evaluation. So when a resident slips off a chair and sits on a carpeted floor - EMS is called. In nearby Fairfax County, one of these facilities generates 7 to 15 calls a week.
    I live in King County, WA. Here we have implemented a program where 2 of the 3 major 911 call centers in the county have a nurse line where minor calls (i.e. "I cut my finger") are transferred rather than dispatching BLS resources. The RN then deals with the caller and if he/she feels EMS resources are necessary, sends the call back to the 911 center. 99% of the time no one is dispatched and the problem is dealt with without sending anybody. To my knowledge, there have been no problems with this system. In 2003, 696 calls were referred there. It sounds like out here your call may well have been sent to the nurse line.

    Have you all considered a program like this?

    See http://www.metrokc.gov/health/ems/20...2003report.pdf for more info. It's on page 34 of the 2003 King County EMS annual report.

  4. #64
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Puget Sound
    Posts
    130

    Default

    Originally posted by blankfireman
    Tillerman25-
    We are able to do this and clear when the BLS unit gets there and no longer requires our assistance, which then leaves us availible for more calls in our first due.
    Please tell me how this is not serving our area? It seems as though having a BLS ambulance would actually HURT our service. We respond quickly, efficently and many times with members that area actually paramedics at their other jobs.
    What about the other areas that you pull ambulances from to do your transports? You're back in service, but they're not.

  5. #65
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    1,098

    Default

    I just got called into work for the second time this weekend. Give me a few hours and I will comment. Because your logic is skewered.

    The dude above me said it well....MP33 or E331 might be in service, but A389 or A309 is out of service for calls in their own communities. Busy stations with no ambulance are a drag on resources from thier surrounding communities. And yes, M30 or M46 should be at 33 or somewhere in 33's first-due. But that is a County issue....
    Last edited by TillerMan25; 06-12-2005 at 07:16 PM.
    Proud Right-Wing Extremist since 1992

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