1. #1
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    Wink Typical Interview Techniques

    It seems that we are all here to help one another, anyone have any good interview tips etc?

  2. #2
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    One question that kind of caught me off gaurd when I was interviewed for my medics position was;

    Give me one time when you were dealing with a situation where there was no set protocol and techinque for dealing with it, how did you solve the situation and what where the outcomes?

    Not sure if you are going for the interview of preforming it, but that is a good question to ask or be prepared for.

  3. #3
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    Default Tape Recorder ó

    The Miracle Oral Board Tool

    What tools can you use to practice and rehearse your oral board answers? Right, a video camera. You need to see how you look in action. But you are trapped with a video camera. Mirror? Sure standing in front of a mirror is good. But you are missing the most valuable tool of all. A hand-held tape recorder.

    I received a call from one of our candidates. He has made it to a few oral boards and one Chiefís Oral without success. He has been invited to the San Diego oral board and wanted to set up a private coaching session. In just a few moments I was aware of something critical. Then I asked him if he was using a tape recorder to practice? Like most people (99.7%), he hemmed and hawed and finally said, ďWell, no. But, Iím thinking about it.Ē

    Even though he had our program that hammers and hammers the point home that you have to use a tape recorder and hear how you sound, he still didnít get the message. His answers were garbage.

    Many applicants want this job so bad they will do almost anything ethically and morally to get it. I guess that doesnít include using a tape recorder to get your timing, inflection, volume, where to cut out material, get rid of the uhís and other pause fillers, or to find out if you really sound like Donald Duck. You need to get married to your hand-held tape recorder. You need to hear what the oral board is going to hear out of your mouth. Itís narrows the distance between you and the badge youíre looking for!

    What is the first thing a candidate says when he hears his voice on a tape recorder? Yep. Thatís not me. Yes, it is McFly. You need to get married to a hand held tape recorder and practice everywhere you go.

    This is usually a guy thing. Guys think about their answers in their head and write them down. Then they think their answers are going to come out of their mouths like magic in the oral. Trust me, they donít! The brain and mouth donít work that way.

    Try this. Take 3X5 cards and write down your oral board questions. Practice your answers with the tape recorder. If you hear something you do not like when you play it back, turn over the 3X5 card and write it down. The next time you go after that question, turn over the card first and see what you donít want to say.

    Let me tell you how critical this really is. If youíre not using a tape recorder to practice, practice, practice, rehearse, rehearse, rehearse and over learn your material until it becomes second nature to you, you might as well not show up for the interview. You are wasting the oral boards time and your time! Seek out another career.

    Understand you still have to interview there too. The above candidate has already lost some great opportunities. Had he been faithfully using a tape recorder to prepare for his oral boards, he probably could have had a badge already.

    Some will say, ďWell, if I practice it too much it will sound canned.Ē NO it wonít! It sure will be planned though. Practice makes permanent. ďLuck is preparation meeting opportunity.Ē One practice session with a tape recorder is worth 10 speaking out louds. After practicing, you will get to a point where your answers will get into your subconscious. Thatís where the magic begins. You canít be fooled.

    We think practicing with a tape recorder is so important; we will not do private coaching with a candidate if they arenít using one. It is a waste of our time and their money. Be advised that your competition knows the value of using a tape recorder. They are catapulting past you if youíre not using one too.

    Instead of posting messages on bulletin boards asking others where theyíre at in the testing process for this city and Iím in the top 40 on this list or whatever, start asking your self this question: What am I doing that can best prepare me for the most important part of the hiring process? . . . The oral board. Because if you canít pass the oral board, or score high enough on the list, you donít get the job. Never! Ever! Ever! Now, whereís your tape recorder?

    You can find more on testing secrets in the Career Article section from the Jobs drop down menu just above this posting.

    "Nothing counts 'til you have the badge . . . Nothing!"

    Fire "Captain Bob" Author, Becoming A Firefighter and
    Conquer Fire Department Oral Boards

    www.eatstress.com

    888-238-3959

  4. #4
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    Great question. I am the one being asked the questions. I like the idea of the tape recorder. Right now I am using my wife who is brutally honest.

    But I will use that as well.

  5. #5
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    Gascott;
    i notice your from NB, were you practicing for fredericton? how did you r interview go?

  6. #6
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    Dear ffyellow,

    No I missed their recruiting call by 2 days, I was talking to the training officer and he mentioned it or I would have been in on it. This was for another dept smaller in size, and I am still waiting to here back on their decision.

  7. #7
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    Default STAR

    I got a good piece of information the other day before my last successful interview. It's one thing to answer any of the questions they give you- regardless of whether you think I can nail it or not. It's another thing to actually ANSWER the questions and give them the information they want to hear. Nobody wants to sit there and listen to you blither on as you try and hammer your way through the question.

    An "acquaintance" on the CFD recruiting team mentioned the STAR principle when helping me get ready for my last interview. Situation Task Action Result. I really found that when I had that format in mind that I was more focussed on answering the question. I likely don't know as much about the grading system as some of the guys that might be able to contribute to this forum- so I'd like to sort of leave it to them to develop a bit if it tweaks some memory.

    I honestly felt like I nailed the interview right from the start. It's REALLY obvious to figure out how it goes, and what each word means. Let me know what you think about that and if it helps you in your efforts.
    Ian "Eno" McLeod

    Train Hard, Fight Easy

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