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  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    Arrow Thoughts On General Safety And A Few Other Things

    I get regular (almost daily) Safety Update notices and this was in the morning traffic.

    Feature Story

    The Safety 1-on-1: A Practical Tool for Building a Safety Culture

    Building a safety culture is like the weather. Everybody talks about it but nobody does anything to change it. Well, that's not completely true. I have developed a handy little tool and used it successfully to build a safety culture and even change the mindset of employees toward safety on the job and off: the Safety 1-on-1. Here's what it is and how to use it. There's also a Model Script in the Tools section that you can access if you're a member of SafetyXChange.

    What the 1-on-1 Involves

    The Safety 1-on-1 is a simple concept. As manager, I made a commitment to meet every employee in the operation individually to discuss safety. In addition to demonstrating my commitment to their individual safety, the 1-on-1 enabled me to understand each employee in a way I could never do if I just observed and met with them on the floor the way most managers do.

    What to Talk About

    The 1-on-1 takes some preparation and effort. First you need to identify what you intend to talk about. I suggest that you focus on:

    Your company's health and safety policy and the employer's and employee's responsibilities under it;

    The company's safety record including statistics on the number of medical aids, first aids, lost time incidents, and near miss incidents; frequency by department or station all of which are also graphed to show trend lines;

    The employee's own individual safety record; and

    The potential hazards he or she faces on the job.

    1-on-1 Is a Two-Way Street

    I have also found that it's a good idea to ask employees if they have any safety concerns that require attention. I know that this is something the Health and Safety Committee is supposed to do. But when you close the door and sit down with every employee, it's amazing what you'll discover. Employees will voice concerns that you might have overlooked and make suggestions you wouldn't have thought of. This can make a big difference in your entire operation.

    Sometimes the employee will prepare a list of the things he wants to discuss with you. This can be a great thing. I make it a point to document the employee's concerns and enter them into a database. I update the list after each interview and publish it at regular intervals so that other employees are aware of what ideas or concerns have been raised. This in turn generates further feedback and dialog.

    The Payoff

    Sometimes I ask myself why I bother doing all of this. Does anybody really care? But a recent experience I had answered all my questions. It happened when an employee who's been working at this same operation for over 20 years told me that, thanks to these 1-on-1's, he was practicing better safety not only on the job but also at home.

    Suddenly it struck me that I was making a difference and actually helping to build a safety culture. In addition to making me feel good, this conversation persuaded me to add "home safety" to our 1-on-1 to tie the family to home safety. It's kind of fun to see the light come on in the employee, when you tie the family into their lives.

    TRAINING TIPS

    Richard Hawk - bio Ending With a Bang, Part 2 By Richard Hawk

    "Great is the art of beginning, but greater is the art of ending."

    --Longfellow

    Longfellow wasn't talking about safety presentations but he might as well have been. In last week's mini-column, I talked about the importance of the ending and warned against signing off with weak and self-effacing statements like "Thank you," and "I guess you're eager to get back to work." Afterwards I received a flood of e-mails from SafetyXChange members wanting to know how they should end their presentations. So I'm back this week to answer that question.

    Here are some tips for ending effectively:

    Keep It Brief: The conclusion should be no more than 10 percent of the presentation. Of course, you don't have to use up your entire 10 percent. Sometimes it's more effective to present a very brief, to-the-point, punch conclusion.

    Summarize the Main Idea: A summary doesn't mean a ramble but a simple and brief statement like: "Now you can see why it's worth the time and any minor incon*veniences to wear your seatbelt."

    Include a Call to Action: Send your listeners away with a clear mandate, whenever possible. Example: "Starting today, make the commit*ment that you will remind fellow workers when they forget to wear their safety glasses."

    These aren't hard and fast rules. But they are good general guidelines that should help you end your presentations with a bang, not a whimper.

    About Richard Hawk

    Richard Hawk is on the SafetyXChange Board of Advisors. He is an international speaker, trainer, author, consultant and all around fun bird. He is also an accomplished guitarist and singer-songwriter. For more than 20 years, he has used his high energy, passion and creativity to help companies inspire their employees to live better lives by attacking stress, improving their communication skills and living safely.

    To view his bio, click here. You can contact Richard by email here.

    Author Biography - Mike Shusterman

    Mike has worked in the forest products business since 1977. A Graduate of Lakehead University (Thunder Bay) in Forestry. Career up to 1999 was mainly in fibre procurement/woodlands managementt. Since 1999, Mike has managed different board plants, most recently in particleboard for Fibratech Manufacturing Inc; in Atikokan Ontario, Canada.

    Mike's role currently responsibilities are Fibre Supply, Health and Safety, Human Resources, and Environment Manager.

    Mike has always had a hand in Health and Safety and Wellness. Mike will agree that his most comprehensive Safety related training came from his time with Weyerhaeuser, who he feels are the "Cadillac" company in forest products safety.

    Mike also operates a consulting company, borealresourcestrategies.com.


    This came from: SafetyXChange [newsletter@safetyxchange.org]
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.


  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    Default 23RD SAFETY CHALLENGE

    Last fall my Unit experienced a tragic death involving a 5YOM who accidentally hung himself with the belt from his housecoat. The following link is to the web page that his family has created promoting safety in childrens clothing.

    I urge everyone to take a view, even if you do not have children, you will know someone who does.

    www.donavanscampaign.com
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    Default

    OSHA & Privacy, Part 2

    Last week, we looked at the apparent conflict between the OSHA Recordkeeping Rule , which requires employers to give employees, former employees and employee representatives access to illness and injury records and the federal Health Information Portability & Accountability Act (HIPAA), which bans employers from using or disclosing records containing personal health information about their employees without permission. We noted that an OSHA Interpretation Letter from last August suggests that HIPAA doesn't apply when a legitimate request for access is made under the Recordkeeping Rule and that employers should grant access to the records even if they contain private medical information about employees and employees didn't give consent to their release.

    The fact that the OSHA Recordkeeping Rule supercedes HIPAA doesn't mean that privacy isn't a consideration for employers. On the contrary, there are privacy restrictions within the Recordkeeping Rule itself that employers must follow when logging and disclosing employee injury and illness records. Let's look at what those restrictions are.

    Recording of 'Privacy Cases'

    Normally, you must list the names of employees who suffer injuries and illnesses on the job. But under the Recordkeeping Rule, there are certain kinds of injuries and illnesses where instead of the employee's name, you list "privacy case". You also have discretion to leave out the employee's job title, date and even location where the injury took place if it would compromise the employee's identity.

    Section 1904.29(b)(7) sets out six kinds of privacy cases:

    Injuries/illnesses to intimate body parts of the reproductive system;
    Sexual assaults;
    Mental illnesses;
    HIV infection, Hepatitis or Tuberculosis;
    Needlestick or sharp cut injuries; and
    Any other case in which the employee asks you not to enter his or her name in the Log.
    Keeping of a Privacy Log

    You must also keep all privacy case illness and injury records in a confidential privacy log that's separate from the OSHA 300 Log. Each case filed must have an identifying number and a corresponding employee name.

    Conclusion

    The privacy protections afforded by the Recordkeeping Rule are much narrower than those under HIPAA. The OSHA privacy protections apply only when certain kinds of injuries and illnesses are involved. And they don't limit use and disclosure of private medical information the way HIPAA does. In addition, although HIPAA and OSHA both afford individuals access to the medical information an employer maintains about them, HIPAA access rights are far broader than the access rights under the OSHA Recordkeeping Rule .



    The Canadian Perspective
    The above article deals with the technical provisions of a U.S. OSHA law and isn't of much interest to Canadians. Here's something that I think Canadian audiences will find more interesting:

    4 Reasons Not to Fear C-45

    On March 31, 2004, a new law called C-45 took effect in Canada. The law requires any person who controls or is in a position to control how work is done to take reasonable steps to protect the person doing the work and others. Failure to take reasonable steps can lead to criminal penalties including fines up to $100,000 and lifetime imprisonment.

    C-45 is pretty scary stuff for safety directors and supervisors. But here are 4 reasons why it's not the beast it appears to be:

    1. C-45 Covers Only the Worst Offenses

    C-45 is Canada's answer to the Westray mining disaster. It's not designed to be used against every safety violation-only safety violations that show wanton and reckless disregard for life and safety-like the Westray officials did in allowing dangerous methane gases to build up in a mine and sending workers to work in those mines knowing how dangerous it was. Ordinary carelessness and innocent mistakes aren't crimes under C-45.

    2. C-45 Targets Upper Management

    Although the law is broadly written, the purpose of C-45 is to hold corporations and corporate officials accountable. True, the first and only prosecution under C-45 was against a supervisor in Ontario. But that case, which was recently dropped, was probably an aberration.

    3. C-45 Doesn't Change the OHS Standards

    C-45 is a criminal law, not an OHS regulation. It doesn't say anything about confined spaces, PPE, lockouts, etc. So you just have to keep following the same standards you always have.

    4. You Can't Be Convicted If You Show Due Diligence

    As noted above, C-45 covers only violations that are reckless and wanton. If you show due diligence to prevent accidents and follow the laws - just like you have in the past - a prosecutor can't convict you.



    WHO WON?
    Is Firing Retaliation for Air Quality Complaints?

    What Happened: A manufacturing company made the decision to fire an engineer as part of a general force reduction. Five days later, before he had been told he was fired, the engineer called the company's ethics hotline to report concerns about air quality in the plant. He also claimed that his supervisor was taking kickbacks. 10 days later, the engineer's boss told him he was fired. The engineer claimed he'd been fired in retaliation for calling the hotline and demanded reinstatement.

    Who Won?

    Answer: The company. The court dismissed the case without a trial. The engineer didn't call the hotline until after the decision to fire him had been made. So the firing wasn't retaliatory.

    Jermer v. Siemens Energy & Automation, Inc., 2005 U.S. App. LEXIS 1210 (6 th Cir), Jan. 25, 2005.
    Last edited by MalahatTwo7; 06-22-2005 at 01:41 PM.
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    Exclamation DANG 'TRODES

    The thing that makes every Firefighter and Electrician CRINGE.....

    This week’s Absolute Shocker is a shocker in the literal sense.

    If you look carefully, you will notice that the power lead plug- top is not designed and intended for use with an Australian socket outlet.

    This should have warned the user that the appliance may not have been designed for use with the Australian 240 Volt system, but rather the 110 Volt system used in so many other countries. But it seems that some people just won’t take the hint.

    What we see here is a dangerously novel variation on the age-old stupidity of “trying to force a square peg into a round hole ”.

    If it won’t fit – don’t use it!

    www.safetysmart.com/ezine/062705/pic_this.html


    Seems Austrailia produces a lot of these photos.... hhhmmmmmm
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

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