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    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    Default U.F.I. Safety Notes

    STRANGE BUT TRUE SAFETY FACTS

    Catch an episode of Gilligan's Island or half of American Idol. Shave, shower and dress. Save up to 15 percent on your car insurance -twice.

    There's not much you can do in 30 minutes. But half an hour is plenty of time for carnage on America's roads and highways. Consider these sobering facts:

    Killing and maiming every half hour.

    Every 13 Seconds: A disabling injury caused by a motor vehicle crash occurs

    Every 2 Minutes: A non-fatal accident-related traffic injury occurs

    Every 12 Minutes: A death caused by a motor vehicle crash occurs

    Every 30 Minutes: An alcohol-related traffic death occurs

    Source: National Safety Council, Report on Injuries in America, 2003
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.


  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Do You Belong in Safety? Ask Benjamin Franklin

    Do You Belong in Safety? Ask Benjamin Franklin

    So you think you want to be a safety director. Lots of people do. But lots of them don't know what's good for them. Are you sure safety is the right profession for you?

    When answering this question, don't just think about salaries, advancement and all the other perks. When I ask if you want to be in safety what I want to know is do you feel passionate about safety? Selling safety is one of if not the most important function of a safety director. But you'll never be any good at it unless you know for sure that you yourself are sold on safety.

    Take the Benjamin Franklin Test

    Would have made a great electrical safety engineer.
    Benjamin Franklin did a lot of really cool things. One of them was to come up with a scientific way to make personal life-altering decisions. If you want to know if you got the conviction to sell safety, try the Ben Franklin method. Here's how it works:

    Take two pieces of paper. On one, list all of the reasons you want to dedicate your life to saving lives and preventing injuries. On the other, list all the reasons you don't want to do this.

    When you're done, the "Why" sheet should completely overwhelm the "Why Nots". If it's even close, my advice to you is this:

    Look for another profession immediately.

    That may sound harsh. But I tell you it's good advice. Trust me, that if you're not completely sold on safety, you're going to be a flop at this job. You're going to end up like one of those people who fill out reports and complain in the hallway that they don't have the money or authority they need to get things done.

    You don't need that; and neither does the world.

    WHAT I LOVE ABOUT SAFETY

    My passion for safety stems from my past: EMT work in Wichita, LPN work in Wichita, and as an Army Medic. While I was an Army Medic, I was involved in a mass casualty situation that burned me out, picking up the pieces after the incident. I know there will not be any pieces to pick up if injuries are prevented and that is my great passion as a safety monitor.

    I know there are safety monitors without a heart for the mission of safety. I've attended safety classes with people who said they were only there because they were ordered to be there. You would be just as safe to pin a safety monitor's badge on a machine as to pin it on someone who has no interest in the job.

    For me, being a safety monitor has opened up endless possibilities for helping people. I wish others could see the importance that their efforts as a safety monitor will make - not just in the lives of other employees but in their families and friends as well. When I see someone retire with a healthy uninjured body to enjoy the rest of his life, that is my great reward for being a safety monitor.

    Robert E. Lee
    Safety Monitor
    P700

    Former Army wardmaster Robert E. Lee has been with the Boeing company for over 26 years. A tool grinder and shop safety monitor in the company's production/fabrication department in Wichita, Kansas, Mr. Lee conducts weekly safety meetings and monthly audits. He's proud to report that their department - which employs more than 5,000 cutters a month - has not had a recordable in over 16 months, and their last lost workday was November 12, 1996.

    Do you share the passion for safety? Tell us what you love about being a safety director. Send me an e mail, glennd@bongarde.com. We'll include your story in a future issue of a SafetyXChange newsletter.

    Author Biography - Art Fettig

    Motivational Humorist Art Fettig is known as America's #1 Safety Commitment Catalyst. He has produced signed personal commitments to safety and to positive interaction from tens of thousands of employees in major corporations throughout the U.S. and Canada. "I get everyone in your organization on your safety team." Fettig admits.

    In 2002 the National Safety Council presented Art their highest award to an individual, The Distinguished Service to Safety Award, for his contribution to the Safety Field.

    Born in Michigan, Art began working in the safety field with the Grand Trunk Western Railroad where he spent many years as a Claim Agent investigating tragic accidents and employee injuries. "We were the worst in the nation in safety." Following years of struggle, Art finally convinced a railroad president that together they could create a change in attitudes and behavior. In the ten years that Art worked directly with the company president, their railroad went from one of the worst to one of the safest railroads in America, three times winning the Harriman Award.

    Fettig has taken his message of commitment worldwide keynoting conferences and working directly with employees with major clients in the power, petrol, natural gas, construction, railroad, telephone and many other fields, from Kalamazoo to Kuala Lumpur, from the Florida Keys on up north to Prudhoe Bay and from the islands of Hawaii to the jungles of Mexico.

    Art is the veteran of over 4,000 live presentations worldwide and in 1980 was designated a Certified Speaking Professional by the National Speakers Association.

    The founder and president of Growth Unlimited Inc. - a 27-year-old corporation committed to improving employee attitudes and behaviour - Art is also the author of over 50 books and booklets including Winning the Safety Commitment and his booklet titled You Do WHAT While You Drive?

    Now residing in North Carolina, Art provides keynote safety presentations for associations and major corporations.

    Art Fettig can be reached at 1.800.441.7676, his e-mail address is artfettig@aol.com and he offers a free weekly newsletter and information at his website http://www.artfettig.com/.


    Any Takers?
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

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