1. #1
    Sr. Information Officer
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    Red face Pine Bluff Arsenal-(Don't think I want to work there)

    Arsenal works to extinguish blaze

    WHITE HALL, Ark. (AP) - Debris from Monday's phosphorus fire at
    the Pine Bluff Arsenal reignited Thursday causing a second blaze,
    which the arsenal worked throughout the afternoon to contain.
    Raini Wright, a spokeswoman for the arsenal, said crews
    investigating Monday's fire were on the sight when the fire
    reignited. She said arsenal officials were most concerned about
    smoke from the blaze.
    "We don't want it to drift over the river and we are trying to
    contain it on post," she said.
    Monday's blaze destroyed a warehouse that was used to store
    thousands of phosphorus weapons.
    The fire was in an area miles away from a recently completed
    incinerator that is destroying the arsenal's chemical weapons
    stockpile.
    The Arsenal is home to 12 percent of the nation's chemical
    weapons stockpile, and destruction of nerve and mustard gas weapons
    began recently.
    The Army is also investigating recent fires at the
    weapons incinerator. The incinerator had fires on May 11 and May
    22.



    (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
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  2. #2
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    Maybe I'm missing something, but aren't incenerators SUPPOSED to have fires?


    Seriously, I've been through some WMD training put on by some of the people at PB and they are pretty high speed. Nuts perhaps, but they're good at what they do.
    ullrichk
    a.k.a.
    perfesser

    a ship in a harbor is safe. . . but that's not what ships are for

  3. #3
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    Post

    WHITE HALL, Ark. (AP) - A leak in a container of white
    phosphorus is suspected to have ignited the fire that destroyed a
    warehouse at the Pine Bluff Arsenal, investigators said Tuesday.
    An investigation team discovered a pallet in the warehouse where
    they believe the fire began on June 6, Arsenal Commander Col. Tom
    Woloszyn said Tuesday.
    Woloszyn said that reports from the investigation will not be
    available for two weeks.
    "I don't expect them out this week. I want a thorough report. I
    don't want a quick one," he said.
    The fire, which produced billowing white smoke visible from
    downtown Pine Bluff, about six miles away, was in an area miles
    away from a recently completed incinerator that is destroying the
    arsenal's chemical weapons stockpile.
    Security guards spotted the fire about midnight on June 6 and
    the blaze was brought under control about an hour later, arsenal
    spokeswoman Raini Wright said.
    Firefighters let the fire burn out that evening and reported it
    completely out by 7 p.m., approximately 19 hours after the fire
    started.
    The fire destroyed more than 7,500 canisters of white
    phosphorus, a chemical the Arsenal uses to fill incendiary devices
    and 155-millimeter shells.
    The arsenal is the Army's sole supplier of white phosphorus
    ammunition, but Woloszyn said the fire will have no impact on the
    Arsenal's phosphorus production.
    "Those containers were not scheduled to be put into the rounds
    themselves," he said.
    The Pine Bluff Arsenal is home to 12 percent of the nation's
    chemical weapons stockpile, and destruction of nerve and mustard
    gas weapons began recently.
    Two unexpected fires at the chemical weapons incinerator here,
    and three at a similar facility in Oregon since April 7, forced
    temporary shutdowns of the incinerator.


    (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

    Anyone from this area know about SOP's and preplans for incidents here? I'd love to view them.
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
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  4. #4
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    Post Followup

    By JOSEPH B. FRAZIER
    Associated Press Writer
    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) - A review seeking the reason for fires in
    nerve gas rockets being cut up for incineration in Oregon and
    Arkansas found no definite root cause, Department of Energy
    researchers said in a report.
    The report, by Sandia National Laboratories, said wear on blades
    used to cut the rockets or contamination may have been a factor.
    Fires broke out at the U.S. Army's Umatilla Weapons Depot near
    Hermiston on April 7, April 23 and May 18 as M55 rockets containing
    the sarin GB nerve agent were being cut up for incineration.
    The Pine Bluff Arsenal in Arkansas had similar fires May 11 and
    May 22.
    Processing and incineration was halted at Umatilla but resumed
    on June 9 after a review by the Oregon Department of Environmental
    Quality concluded it was safe to continue, and also has resumed in
    Arkansas.
    Umatilla depot spokeswoman Mary Binder said the three fires that
    burned there involved propellant manufactured in October of 1962,
    and that rockets being burned now have propellants of different
    batches.
    She said nine rocket motors with propellants from three batches
    have been shipped to the Picatinny Arsenal, the Army weapons
    research and development facility in New Jersey, but that results
    are not back.
    In each case the fires started as blades cutting up the weapons
    into eight pieces sliced into the propellant section.
    The New Mexico-based Sandia report said wear and pitting on one
    blade was visible, although it had been used in the destruction of
    fewer than 1,000 rockets, far fewer than the 2,500-rocket
    expectation.
    It also said variations in the stability of the propellant
    because of contamination or manufacturing variations may have
    played a role.
    Wear and pitting of the blades could have facilitated the
    retention of contaminants, the report said.
    It said the blades are inspected after every 800 rockets.
    The fires in reinforced unmanned rooms caused no injuries and
    little damage. Binder said the rooms are designed to withstand such
    fires, and that others may occur.
    Crews at Umatilla have added more spray nozzles to cool the
    rocket-chopping blade and extinguish flames.
    The depot contains about 12 percent of the nation's supply of
    chemical rockets, bombs, mines and artillery shells and began
    burning late last year to comply with treaty obligations.
    The M55 rockets contain about 10 pounds of sarin each. A half a
    milligram is considered fatal, and the chemical is 500 times more
    poisonous than cyanide.
    So far the depot has destroyed about 18,000 of the 91,000 sarin
    GB rockets stored there. Binder said work will begin next on about
    14,000 rockets containing the VX nerve agent.
    The project is expected to take several years to complete.

    (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
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  5. #5
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    Any place that has the words "arsenal" or "weapons depot" in its title is a good place to not work.
    Chris Gaylord
    Emergency Planner / Fire Captain, UC Santa Cruz FD

  6. #6
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    Post Report issued

    Final report concludes leak in canister probably caused June 6
    blaze


    WHITE HALL, Ark. (AP) - Army officials say they've finished
    investigating a June 6 fire at the Pine Bluff Arsenal that
    destroyed a warehouse containing 75-hundred canisters of white
    phosphorus. A news release from the arsenal today said the fire
    began when a small amount of the phosphorus was exposed to the air,
    probably through a tiny leak in a canister.
    White phosphorus, a highly flammable chemical, catches fire once
    exposed to air or to heat at 90 degrees Fahrenheit or above. The
    release said the heat generated by the exposed phosphorus heated
    the nearby canisters and ignited the roof framing, and the
    warehouse was totally destroyed.
    The release from arsenal spokeswoman Cheryl Avery said other
    stored canisters of white phosphorus at the arsenal were being
    evaluated to check for possible leaks. The release said
    questionable canisters would be isolated for safety purposes
    pending proper disposal.
    White phosphorus, which produces a dense white smoke as it
    burns, is used on battlefields to create smokescreens to mask
    activities commanders want to keep hidden.



    (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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