1. #1
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Arlington,TX
    Posts
    3

    Default Storage Container for Trench Rescue Equip.

    Our Department recently purchased two large metal storage containers (8X24). They will store our Trench Rescue equipment. In one will be all wood, plywood, 2x12s, timber and strongbacks. The other will store hydraulic and air shores, saws, tools etc. My delema is holding everything in place when we have a large scale incident that involves moving the containers to the scene. I am trying to design an interior with shelves and bins to hold equipment in place. We can weld shelves and bin racks on to the interior. Anyone with suggestions, photos and or plans would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber
    F52Westside's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Posts
    268

    Default

    Hey bomberobg

    I think there is a "Specialized Rescue" section in the forums. You might get more responses if posted there, just a suggestion. I wish I had some ideas for you, but creativity isn't my strong suit.

    Stay Safe & Bring 'em Home!
    Eddie C.
    I.A.F.F. Local 3008

    "Doin' it for lives n' property"

    ** "The comments made here are this person's views and not that of the organizations to which I am affiliated" **

  3. #3
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Arlington,TX
    Posts
    3

    Default Storage Cotainers

    Hey F52Westside! Thanks for the info! Be safe!

  4. #4
    Forum Member
    fftrainer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 1999
    Location
    Northern, NJ
    Posts
    889

    Default

    I know this is a generic cop-out response but seriously, lay it out based on what equipment you have and/or what you intend to get in the near future. You have a blank canvas to work with, experiment. Consider building a temporary setup out of cheap lumber and see how everything fits, adjust it till it is more of what you want and then fabricate it out of more permanent welding and higher quality woods.

    The one thing I like is 'raising' the floor for long lumber storage. The other thing I can say from experience is avoid stacking as much as possible. The stack is only neat and orderly on original setup and on a job you always need the thing on the bottom first so the stack is torn apart and after working a long tiring job, nobody feels like putting a jig saw puzzle back together just right. My other recommendation, if possible is to label everythings spot on the shelves so that anyone can put it back "Oh this label says sawzall, so let me put the sawzall here"

  5. #5
    Forum Member
    firemanpat29's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    florida
    Posts
    427

    Default

    I agree with the false floor idea. You can take it
    a few steps further with false ceiling( for the light
    stuff) and walls for the plywood. maybe a tool rack
    on one side with the most common tools closest to
    the door. I have always prefered the center closest
    to the door to be left open,never know when you may
    need to load special tools or supplies for a specific
    job. look at local snap-on mans truck or yard service
    with a closed in trailer for ideas and dont forget to
    think outside of the box,,,lieraly Hang ext. cords
    hose reels and simular items outside you trailer to
    save space. Maybe even a "plumbers" rack on top with
    steps welded to one side of trailer. The tounge of trailer
    is usualy wasted space maybe put steps th roof there.
    Dang now you have me wanting to go home and weld something.

  6. #6
    Forum Member
    firemanpat29's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    florida
    Posts
    427

    Default

    One more thought check with local home depot
    lowes, ace whatever and see what they stack thier
    tools and lumber on. and ask what they do with them
    when they renew the display.

  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,167

    Default

    We had a problem with plywood storage. We expanded on the backboard storage on an old ambulance. Store it under the floor. Weld a deck 6" off the floor. On the outside sides of the container install doors 6" high so you can slide the plywood in and out. This will keep you from having to build cumburson vertical racks inside. Will also made it easier to off load. You could also store your longer timbers(4x4x8, 4x8x8)in a simular compartment. I would recommend since you have two storage containers do it to both.

    Just an idea. Good luck.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register