1. #1
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    Default I'm a new probie, any advice?

    Any adice from you seasoned vets out there? I spent 6 years in the military, so I know the "game". Any tips other than to keep mouth shut, nose in books, clean, answer phone, No TV? Just looking for some tips.

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    Good luck and welcome to the fire service.

    Don't act like you "know the game." Even if you know better than what someone is telling you just listen and act like you are hearing some great new information. When you get some time on the job you can call that guy out.

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    Default

    Originally posted by Farmun
    Good luck and welcome to the fire service.

    Don't act like you "know the game." Even if you know better than what someone is telling you just listen and act like you are hearing some great new information. When you get some time on the job you can call that guy out.
    DITTO!!

    Nothing worse then a probie who acts like they have 20 years on the job.

    And dont be affriad to make mistakes. Probies are supposed to make mistakes, just make sure you learn from them.
    Fire Marshal/Safety Officer

    IAAI-NFPA-IAFC/VCOS-Retired IAFF

    "No his mind is not for rent, to any god or government"
    RUSH-Tom Sawyer

    Success is when skill meets opportunity
    Failure is when fantasy meets reality

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    stay above the bull****.

    just like in the military, those who dish the most frat-boyish initiation **** are the ones who took it the worstwhen it was their turn, usually because they are the biggest all-around losers on the job. busting someone's balls in good fun is just that. but there are habitual line steppers out there. these are the weak, the lame, and the unoriginal. many of them got hired before you and have been sitting on their asses ever since, waiting to have their petty revenge. they lack balls, so they try to find the most vulnerable target. don't be that target.

    and when the next sub comes on the job, don't pass it on.

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    Default Thread continued

    In addition to my above posting, anybody know any special touches? Signature things to do around the station, that I can borrow?

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    Default Re: Thread continued

    Originally posted by ladderwell
    In addition to my above posting, anybody know any special touches? Signature things to do around the station, that I can borrow?
    A couple things. Come into work early, every shift. Be the first FF from your shift to report. And I dont mean show up early and make a bee line for the coffee pot. Put your gear next to the rig, check out your SCBA. Then go find the FF your replaceing and let them know your ready to take over. The off going FF will apreciate that your there and they wont get stuck with a late call.

    Another is when it comes to cleaning the rig, do it right. Take the time to not only wash, but do the windows (inside & out) sweep out the cab, wipe down the dash. Im an engineer and I spend a couple hours every shift in the rig. A 20 minute wash/rinse/wipe doesnt cut it.

    Be sure you check with the engineer first, some of us can be quite anal about our rigs and who messes with them.
    Fire Marshal/Safety Officer

    IAAI-NFPA-IAFC/VCOS-Retired IAFF

    "No his mind is not for rent, to any god or government"
    RUSH-Tom Sawyer

    Success is when skill meets opportunity
    Failure is when fantasy meets reality

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    this isn't a special trick, but i see new (and old) guys who either forget or don't know this cardinal rule:

    never let someone be the only one working. if somebody at your station is up and about doing something, don't make them ask for your help and DEFINATELY don't let them come looking for you. this goes double for actual training.
    ask people to show you how to do things, don't wait for them to show you.
    and even if you know something, if somebody goes out of their way to show it to you, the proper response is not "i already know how to do that", it's "thank you".
    as a matter of pride, outwork all those old fat men.

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    Default

    One thing I always tell the new guys at my house, especially in the summer, Have dry clothes in your car for that "accidental" overspray your going to get during a pump drill
    Doug Velting Jr
    President Cassville Volunteer Fire Co
    dougvelting@fireexec.com
    www.cassvillefire.org
    Fire Exec .com

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    Default Here again...

    From So. Cal...

    TORRANCE FIRE DEPARTMENT

    RECRUIT (NEW) FIREFIGHTER GUILDLINES


    The fire service is a para-military organization that requires teamwork, discipline, the ability to make decisions and work under pressure. If you do not like the idea of working under authority or have trouble with self discipline and living with rules and living with rules and regulations which restrict your personal freedom, for the sake of public safety, you are in the wrong place!

    As a member of the Torrance Fire Department, you are expected to obey orders, exhibit exceptional personal hygiene, conform to department rules and regulations, respect the chain of command, work well with your peers, have integrity and perform repetitious mental tasks with excellence. At the same time, you should demonstrate the ability to think on your feet, use good independent judgment, be aggressive and display common sense concerning safety for yourself and others.

    We will expect and settle for nothing less than 100% from you at all times…


    GENERAL GUIDELINES

    1. Be aggressive at all times, first to details, last to leave.
    2. If it is dirty, clean it. If it empty- fill it.
    3. If it rings, answer it before anyone else does.
    4. Do not be late to anything.
    5. T.V. will not be watched without permission of the Company Officer.
    6. Use initiative to address work that you see needs completion.
    7. Keep busy! Look for something to do. If you can not find a job, Study.
    8. When an alarm comes in, be the first one on the rig.
    9. Offer your help to anyone doing anything. One person works, we all work.
    10. Respect authority.
    11. Know your job and duties and know them well.
    12. Keep a low profile. Keep your opinions to yourself.
    13. Assist in and around the kitchen, even if you’re not assigned there.
    14. Remember…The reputation you establish now will follow you forever.

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    Default

    Don't go for flashy special touches. Little things done without fanfare make a good impression. Be the person who makes sure the toilet paper and paper towels are always full; who never lets a dirty dish sit in the sink; who dusts things that NEVER get dusted. Always keep in mind that you are part of a team and that your job is to make the team look good, not just yourself.

    However, if the rest of your team is snoozing on the couch in front of the TV, don't plop down next to them. You should be sitting at the table reviewing SOPs or streets. If someone comes in and cracks on them for being lazy, don't join in. A modest comment about being a rookie who wants to get some shine on his/her pants is appropriate.

    Just a couple of things I picked up during my first year.

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    Thumbs up Good Points Already.........

    You already have some pointers, and I'd add just one. There are Fire Stations that have more than one type of person there. Combo depts have Full Time people and Volunteers in the same station, often on the same apparatus. There are also stations with "Third Service" or Private EMS Units housed with the Firefighters. Sometimes one group will "Pick at" the others, or vice versa. Stay out of (read Above) that type of BS.
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
    In memory of
    Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
    Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

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    I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

    www.gdvfd18.com

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    Default

    If there is an A-hole who gives you a lost of BS, dont outright confront him, chances are he will only step up the tempo. Your best bet/s with this would be:
    -Tell your officer
    -Make friends with some of the other guys, especially ones who dont like the above said person (there is always one because of reasons posted above by another guy).

    Just because you are a rookie, it doesnt give them a right to bully you, but having said that, have a sense of humour about it.
    "There are only two things that i know are infinite, the universe and human stupidity. And im not so sure about the former."

    For all the life of me, i cant see a firefighter going to hell. At least not for very long. We would end up putting out all the fires and annoying the devil too much.

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    Default

    WELCOME TO THE FIRE SERVICE,

    Looks like these guys filled you in pretty good.

    If the worming doesn't get to bad just suck it up and have a good memory.

    The best pay back is a worm that has no author.

    Pick a good mentor. Watch, Listen, and Learn.

    Just like being a soldier the trick is to get threw the first couple of years with out making any major mistakes that will get you or someone else hurt.

    HAVE FUN AND BE SAFE!

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    Default

    Some real good advice was givin in these posts, all I can add is if you want to get on the Captains good side, put a real good shine on the waterhammer first thing tomorrow morning. Welcome and good luck probie.


    God bless and pull the ceiling as you go.

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    Default

    How about being in my shoes??


    It is quite possible in 3-4 short weeks I am going from 12 years on the job...senior man on the crew (hell the house!) next to the officers that is...taking young probies under my wing and all that jazz...gets the prime vacation picks..doesnt have to scrub the crapper anymore...to being a snot nosed rookie cadet all over again!

    They'll be guys 10 years younger than me ordering me around like Ive never seen the working end of the nob! LMAO!

    Actually....after what Ive been thru on my current dept.....I will be truthfully looking forward to the experience...strange as that may sound..

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    Default New Rookie

    What you do when you first start out will set your reputation and follow you throughout your career. If you don’t start out on the right foot, they will show you the door. The crew already knows more about you before you show up than you think.

    Use these standards during station visits, your interview process, and as a new rookie to demonstrate you already know what to do when hired:

    You’re a snotty nose rookie. Keep your mouth shut. Be cordial, friendly and humble. You have no time or opinion until you earn it. You can’t force it. That will come with a lot of calls and a few fires.

    Big clue here. Leave the electronic leashes off and in your vehicle, along with your piercings, until a time where all your duties are complete. No matter what you might think and how friendly everyone seems to be, you are being watched! It could hurt you big time.

    Unless you’re told differently, put up and don’t forget to take down the flag. If the phone or the doorbell rings, make sure you’re the first one running to answer it. There will be certain duties on each day of the week. Tuesday could be laundry day, Saturday yards. Keep track. Stay busy around the station. Always be in a clean proper uniform. Always be ready to get on the rig and respond.

    Check out the gear on the rig each morning. Make sure the O2 gauge and the reserve bottle shows enough to handle a long EMS call.
    Firefighters usually have “Their” place to sit at the table and in front of the TV. Don’t hog the newspaper. The off-going shift has the first crack at the newspaper. You probably have probation tests.

    Don’t park yourself in front of the TV; you have a test coming up. Stay busy. No matter what the atmosphere, you’re being watched.

    Although you might be a good cook, don’t volunteer to cook until asked or rotated in. Make sure your meals are on time. The old adage “Keep them waiting long enough and they will eat anything” doesn’t apply here. Be the last one to serve your plate. Don’t load up your plate the first time around. Wait to go for seconds.

    Always have your hands in the sink doing the dishes after a meal. Be moving out with the garbage and mopping the kitchen floor after each meal.

    Learn how to help the officer complete response reports.

    Don’t tell jokes until you’re accepted.

    Don’t gossip.

    Don’t play “Your” music on the radio. Don’t be a stupid generation X’er or Y’er and always ask why when told to do something. Help others’ with their assignments when you finish yours.

    Ask how you’re doing. Volunteer for assignments. Keep track of these to present at your evaluations.

    Don’t start pulling hose and other equipment at a scene until the captain tells you.

    Always get off the rig before it backs up. Stand to the rear side to guide the rig. Never turn your back on the backing up rig.

    It’s not uncommon to move to one or more stations during your probation. At your new station, don’t act like you already have time. Unfortunately, you have to start all over again as the new rookie.

    You will have an elated feeling rolling out on your first calls. There is nothing like it. It could last your whole career. Enjoy and savor it. You earned it. You’re the last of America’s Heroes.

    I miss it.

    You can find more on testing secrets in the Career Article section from the Jobs drop down menu just above this posting.

    "Nothing counts 'til you have the badge . . . Nothing!"

    Fire "Captain Bob" Author,
    Becoming A Firefighter,
    Conquer Fire Department Oral Boards, and
    It’s Your Turn in the Hot Seat!

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    888-238-3959
    Last edited by CaptBob; 07-02-2005 at 09:06 AM.

  17. #17
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    Default

    Welcome to the fire service.

    #1 Listen
    #2 Look
    #3 Respect the time those you work with and for have put in
    #4 Continue to Train
    #5 Never quit learning
    #6 Never think you have learned or know it all
    09-11 .. 343 "All Gave Some..Some Gave ALL" God Bless..R.I.P.
    ------------------------------
    IACOJ Minister of Southern Comfort
    "Purple Hydrant" Recipient (3 Times)
    BMI Investigator
    ------------------------------
    The comments, opinions, and positions expressed here are mine. They are expressed respectfully, in the spirit of safety and progress. They do not reflect the opinions or positions of my employer or my department.

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    welcome to the fire service, all this fine people have given you the best advice anyone could give!
    Firefighting is not just a job, its a way of life........
    IACOJ

    SORRY FELLAS, NO TIKI BAR HERE!

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    Default

    The two best things to remember:

    A: You know nothing.

    B: You'll never know everything.

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    I've got no time on myself, but this is what they told me before we left the academy:

    Always remember that a whale will swim all the way to the bottom of the ocean to take a ****, making whale **** the lowest **** on the planet, until you arrive!

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    My biggest advice is:

    1. Don't act like you know how to do something when you don't, it only gets you into trouble.

    2. Always ask questions, there is no stupid question, if someone gives you a hard time answering it, go to someone else or an officer.

    3. Always ask multiple people, some people on departments think they are know-it-alls and they don't know anything. If you ask multiple people you are bound to get a right answer.
    EMT-B
    Garfield Twp. Fire Department
    http://www.garfieldfire.com

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    Default tips

    always be respectful of your elders... if you don't know something, or think its a stupid question, DON'T BE AFRAID TO ASK! someone may have the same question, and also, treat fellow officers the way YOU want to be treated, and watch out for pranks, our dept is NOTORIOUS for pranks...

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Re: Thread continued

    Originally posted by Dave1983


    And I dont mean show up early and make a bee line for the coffee pot.

    Actually I think you should make a beeline to the coffee pot so the coffee will be ready when the senior guys wake-up/show-up in the morning. After the coffee is started, then continue with the rest of the advice given.

    I've only been on about three years, and, while nice to have a few guys (and a few fires!) under me, I still realize there are a lot of guys who have been around a lot longer. It surprises me how some of the newer guys act. Maybe they don't know how good this job is compared to some others out there. Don't be "That Guy". Show respect for the Brotherhood and earn your place.
    If you "do the right things" when you're the new guy, the senior guys will respect you more, and you will transition into "not being the new guy" much quicker and smoother.
    Marc S.
    Firefighter/Paramedic
    Solon Local 2079

    (Previously posted as Hobbitt. Registered December '02,)

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