1. #1
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    Default Dennis approaches hurricane strength

    Watch out Gulf Coast, HERE I COME!


    Dennis approaches hurricane strength
    Cindy downgraded to tropical depression

    MIAMI, Florida (CNN) -- Tropical Storm Dennis approached hurricane strength Wednesday as it pushed across the Caribbean toward Jamaica and Cuba.

    Meanwhile, Cindy shrank into a tropical depression, as it pushed across Mississippi into Alabama with heavy rains and gusty winds.

    At 2 p.m. ET, Dennis' top sustained winds had reached 70 mph as the storm tracked west-northwest at about 14 mph.

    Forecasters expect Dennis to cross the hurricane threshold at 74 mph Wednesday afternoon or evening and increase its intensity as it crosses the Gulf of Mexico later in the week -- possibly reaching Category 3 status at near 115 mph.

    Jamaica and the southwestern peninsula of Haiti were under a hurricane warning, and the southern coast of the Dominican Republic was under a tropical storm warning.

    A hurricane watch covered the Cayman Islands and eastern Cuba.

    Located 350 miles east-southeast of Kingston, Jamaica, Dennis appeared poised to scoot between Jamaica and the Cuba's southern coast before crossing its eastern end.

    Current forecasting models show the storm missing eastern Florida, but they disagree about where it will make landfall -- anywhere from New Orleans, Louisiana, to Tampa, Florida.

    The National Hurricane Center predicted Dennis to make landfall Monday near Mobile, Alabama, but cautioned the storm was still too far away for a truly accurate forecast.

    Mobile was already swamped by rains from Cindy.

    Water covered roads in several locations in the Alabama city, including the Mobile Bay Causeway between Mobile and Spanish Fort. Interstate 10 across the bay was barely above the water level, as a high tide kept the gray, choppy waters over the roadway.

    By 11 a.m. ET Cindy's winds had dropped to 35 mph, and all watches and warnings were canceled, the hurricane center said, but the rains kept up with the storm's northeastward passage. Located 50 miles north-northwest of Mobile, the depression was moving to the northeast at about 14 mph.

    The storm is expected to further weaken as it passes over land, but is expected to dump up to 10 inches of rain along the coast and across the southeastern United States.

    Capt. Mike Sanders with the St. Bernard Parish Sheriff's Office said the coastal community has held up well.

    "No reports of injuries, water in homes," he said. "A very major inconvenience, but we're very blessed that Cindy seems to be moving and not stalling and that was our main concern."

    Col. Perry Ebbert, the director of Homeland Security in New Orleans, said the Big Easy could get hit with as much as 6 inches of rain and even more in low-lying areas, potentially creating heavy flooding.

    "Even at 70 miles per hour, we shouldn't have any major wind damage. But living in a bowl down here, we're always concerned about lots of rainwater," he said.

    New Orleans missed the worst of the winds when Cindy pushed ashore east of the city, but the strong winds did knock over trees and bring water over the low-lying streets. By late morning Wednesday, cleanup crews were at work in the area while authorities kept a close eye on Dennis.

    Cindy's move across the Gulf of Mexico forced the evacuation of 23 of 819 oil platforms and six of 135 oil rigs, according to the Minerals Management Service. Dennis' approach, as a stronger storm, could prompt more.

    The shutdown has interrupted more than 3 percent of the Gulf's normal oil and natural gas production, pushing oil prices above $60 a barrel in trading Wednesday. (Full story)

    Dennis' formation makes July 5 the earliest date in recorded tropical storm history that four named storms have been formed in the Atlantic basin, the hurricane center said. Tropical storms Arlene and Bret preceded Dennis and Cindy, but neither reached hurricane strength.

    CNN's Dan Lothian, Chad Myers, Ninette Sosa and Amanda Moyer contributed to this story.


    Be for Peace, but don't be for the Enemy!
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    Quote Originally Posted by nyckftbl View Post
    LOL....dont you people have anything else to do besides b*tch about our b*tching?

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    To All our Brothers and Sisters who may be effected by this storm. Be Carefull and Stay safe, Let us hear what you did after is is all over.
    A "Good" fire is not measured by how big it is, but by the fact that everyone is going home safe, and that we possibly learned something new about firefighting. Member:IACOJ

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    Oh the joy.
    Fire Marshal/Safety Officer

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    Hope and pray this thing weakens and/or changes paths.

    Right now, it is on track to a nearly identical landfall point as Hurricane Ivan.

    There's still a lot of debris from Ivan lying around and many, many structures remain in a vulnerable state. There are also tons of structures being rebuilt that are nothing but wood frame right now.

    A new strike would not only wipe out all the recovery progress made thus far, it would add new losses to the mix.

    I don't want to wish this storm on anybody, but the Alabama/Florida panhandle area just can't stand another hit this soon after Ivan.

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    Thumbs down happy, happy, joy, joy

    Just what we need, another storm coming for a visit. Denis don't take this the wrong way but go be a menace somewhere else, the pan handle recieved egnough damage from Ivan the Terrible. In today's Pensacola New Journal FEMA is closing some offices in Pensacola, mmmm
    if this storm comes they will have to re=open next week.

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    Angry

    Good luck guys. I have family in Pensacola and have always loved that town. My grandmother owned "ye Old English tavern" that was next to East Brent Baptist church. It was terrible seeing the devastation from Ivan.
    We struck down evil with the mighty sword of teamwork and the hammer of not bickering.

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    Dennis, this storm is a menace!



    God bless and pull the ceiling as you go.

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    Post Be prepared...be SAFE!

    MORANT BAY, Jamaica - Hurricane Dennis swept away a bridge and
    peeled tin roofs off homes in Haiti, killing at least five people
    as it strengthened to a Category 4 storm and headed straight for
    Cuba. Forecasters said it could reach the U.S. Gulf Coast by
    Sunday.
    The Hurricane Center in Miami said the eye was swirling over
    water about 100 miles south of the Cuban coast and moving to the
    northwest at about 15 miles an hour.
    The hurricane's winds neared 135 mph as it sideswiped Jamaica on
    Thursday. Forecasters predicted the storm could hit the United
    States anywhere from Florida to Louisiana by Sunday or Monday,
    raising fears that oil production in the Gulf of Mexico would be
    disrupted by the fourth storm in as many weeks.
    Thunderstorms swept over the Dominican Republic, southern Haiti
    and northeast Jamaica. The Cayman Islands and Cuba were under
    hurricane warnings, including the U.S. detention camp at Guantanamo
    Bay holding some 520 terror suspects.
    Hurricane Center forecasters warned the Sierra Maestra Mountains
    in southeastern Cuba could get 15 inches of rain, while Jamaica's
    coffee-producing Blue Mountains could see 10 inches. Hurricane
    force winds reached 50 miles from eye and tropical storm force
    winds another 140 miles.
    In the southwestern Haitian town of Grand Goave, an Associated
    Press Television News reporter saw at least four people killed when
    a wood and metal bridge collapsed. Witnesses said the river came
    suddenly rushing over the bridge.
    Elsewhere on the dangerously deforested island, wind gusts
    uprooted a palm tree and sent it into a mud hut, killing a fifth
    person in the southern town of Les Cayes, the Red Cross said. Many
    homes and roads in the south were flooded, some by as much as three
    feet of water.
    The Florida Keys were under a hurricane warning Thursday and
    ordered tourists to evacuate, and the southern Florida peninsula
    was on tropical storm watch, expecting severe conditions within 36
    hours.
    In Jamaica, Prime Minister Percival Patterson urged people in
    low-lying areas to evacuate.
    "Let us all work together in unity so that we will be spared
    the worst," Patterson said in a national radio broadcast. Despite
    his appeal, only about 1,000 people were in shelters late
    afternoon.
    The hurricane center warned the eye could pass over central Cuba
    sometime Friday afternoon. In the communist-run island, where the
    military-style government has been praised by the United Nations
    for its extensive hurricane preparedness plans, more than 100,000
    people had been evacuated in the island's southeast, civil defense
    officials said on state television.
    There were no immediate plans to evacuate detainees or troops
    from the U.S. detention center's Camp Delta at Guantanamo Bay,
    located on Cuba's extreme southeast end about 150 yards from the
    ocean, Gen. Jay Hood said.
    Troops put heavy steel shutters on sea-facing cell windows as
    heavy surf sent splashes of salt spray over the razor wire fence.
    Officials said Camp Delta was built to withstand winds up to 90
    mph.
    Oil prices rose sharply Wednesday on concerns about the
    Caribbean weather, but closed down 55 cents Thursday, at $60.73 a
    barrel, as terrorist blasts in London led investors to abandon
    riskier investments.
    Dennis came right behind Tropical Storm Cindy, which made
    landfall late Tuesday in Louisiana and hindered oil production and
    refining. On Thursday, remnants of Cindy dumped heavy rain on parts
    of the Carolinas, prompting flash flood and tornado watches.
    The hurricane center's lead forecaster, Martin Nelson, said it
    was the first time the Atlantic hurricane season had four named
    storms this early since record-keeping began in 1851. The season
    runs from June 1 to Nov. 30.
    Last year, three catastrophic hurricanes - Frances, Ivan and
    Jeanne - tore through the Caribbean with a collective ferocity not
    seen in years, causing hundreds of deaths and billions of dollars
    in damage.

    (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
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    Dennis approaches hurricane strength
    And here i was thinking that we had a new superhero on our hands.
    "There are only two things that i know are infinite, the universe and human stupidity. And im not so sure about the former."

    For all the life of me, i cant see a firefighter going to hell. At least not for very long. We would end up putting out all the fires and annoying the devil too much.

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    Update:
    30 to 40 minute wait on gas lines, people taking the advice to leave serious. Grocery stores are busy with people stocking up, news coverage all over the place. We are bracing for another huricane.
    Ivan the Terrible and now Denis the Menace is going to turn Pensacola into a ghost town.

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    Thumbs down

    310 PM EDT update from the Natl Hurricane Center:

    000
    WTNT64 KNHC 081910
    TCUAT4
    HURRICANE DENNIS TROPICAL CYCLONE UPDATE
    NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
    310 PM EDT FRI JUL 08 2005

    REPORTS FROM THE CUBAN METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE AND CIVIL DEFENSE
    THROUGH HAM RADIO OPERATORS INDICATE A WIND GUST TO 149 MPH
    OCCURRED AT CIENFUEGOS CUBA AROUND 130 PM EDT. MORE THAN 85 PERCENT
    OF THE POWERLINES WERE DOWN AND EXTENSIVE DAMAGE HAS OCCURRED TO
    THE COMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE.

    FORECASTER STEWART

  12. #12
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    Hurricane warnings and watches and tropical storm warnings and watches now cover the entire southern tip and west coast of Florida with flood advisories for coastal areas. Ruskin NWS has just issued a special marine warning for coastal waters out as far as 20 miles. Winds in excess of 60 MPH
    09-11 .. 343 "All Gave Some..Some Gave ALL" God Bless..R.I.P.
    ------------------------------
    IACOJ Minister of Southern Comfort
    "Purple Hydrant" Recipient (3 Times)
    BMI Investigator
    ------------------------------
    The comments, opinions, and positions expressed here are mine. They are expressed respectfully, in the spirit of safety and progress. They do not reflect the opinions or positions of my employer or my department.

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    Originally posted by CAPPYY
    Dennis, this storm is a menace!

    If they are going to name a storm after ME, it better not be a wimpy one!!!!

    Good luck to all that my storm touches this weekend, it is nothing personal, just the weather blowing off some steam that builds up after providing light rain to make the flowers and plants grow, fun snow to play in and enjoy, and beautiful sunny days most of the time.
    Be for Peace, but don't be for the Enemy!
    -Big Russ

    Learn from the mistakes of others; you won't live long enough to make them all yourself.

    Quote Originally Posted by nyckftbl View Post
    LOL....dont you people have anything else to do besides b*tch about our b*tching?

  14. #14
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    Well....if you have never been through a storm (or 4) you would not understand the apprehension and panic it instills among many. It may be funny to have a storm names after you...but if it becomes a killer then how much recognition is that worth? My name is on the list this year and I hope it never gets that far...

    Sorry....don't mean to dampen (no pun) the fun here, but this is serious business.
    09-11 .. 343 "All Gave Some..Some Gave ALL" God Bless..R.I.P.
    ------------------------------
    IACOJ Minister of Southern Comfort
    "Purple Hydrant" Recipient (3 Times)
    BMI Investigator
    ------------------------------
    The comments, opinions, and positions expressed here are mine. They are expressed respectfully, in the spirit of safety and progress. They do not reflect the opinions or positions of my employer or my department.

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    A storm named captstanm1, wow, this I gotta see!

    God bless and pull the ceiling as you go.

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    Default Here we go again ... you guys in the path STAY SAFE!

    Reports: Hurricane kills up to 32 in Caribbean
    Dennis bringing hard rains to Florida; U.S. landfall expected Sunday

    Saturday, July 9, 2005 Posted: 1617 GMT (0017 HKT)

    Satellite image taken at 5:32 a.m. ET Saturday shows Dennis southwest of Key West, Florida.
    Image:

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    Dennis' outer bands drench Florida(:43)

    Hurricane preparedness tips(1:49)

    Florida governor tells residents to stay home(2:52)
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    Interactive: Dennis' projected path

    National Hurricane Center
    HURRICANE DENNIS
    As of 11 a.m. ET Saturday
    Position of center: 125 miles (201 km) west of Key West
    Latitude: 24.7 north
    Longitude: 83.8 west
    Top sustained winds: 100 mph (161 kph)
    Source: National Hurricane Center SPECIAL REPORT

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    Manage Alerts | What Is This? MIAMI, Florida (CNN) -- After lashing Cuba and Haiti with powerful winds and causing the deaths of up to 32 people, Hurricane Dennis surged over the Gulf of Mexico, brushing by Key West, Florida, on the way.

    Local broadcasts from Haiti said as many as 22 were killed when winds and rains hit.

    The aid agency Concern Worldwide said it had confirmed at least five people had been killed in Haiti but believed the reports of 22 were accurate.

    The storm left at least 10 people dead in Cuba as it pounded the island with powerful winds and torrential rains, according to President Fidel Castro in a televised address to his countrymen.

    At noon ET, the eye of the storm was about 135 miles west of Key West and 465 miles south-southeast of Apalachicola, Florida, forecasters said.

    It was moving toward the northwest at about 14 mph, and that general motion was expected to continue for the next 24 hours. Hurricane-force winds extended outward up to 35 miles from the storm's eye, and tropical storm-force winds extended up to 175 miles.

    The three-day forecast for Dennis has the storm striking Sunday near Pensacola, Florida, after strengthening over the warm Gulf waters. However, such predictions often change because of the unpredictable nature of a hurricane's movement.

    Some 10 million Americans are potentially in Dennis' path, according to federal officials.

    Dennis is now a Category 2 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 100 mph (161 kph), the National Hurricane Center said Saturday.

    Key West's streets deserted
    Meanwhile, the normally bustling streets of Key West, Florida -- where one gust from Dennis was measured Saturday morning at 74 mph -- were largely empty as the storm dealt a glancing blow.

    Hurricane-force winds extended up to 40 miles from the storm's eye, and tropical storm-force winds extended up to 175 miles from the center.

    Minor damage was reported on Key West, and authorities asked residents to remain indoors Saturday.

    Forecasters said a storm surge of 3 to 6 feet and between 4 and 8 inches of rain remained likely in the western coastal areas Florida.

    A tornado was reported in Manatee County, Florida, some 200 miles from Dennis' center, Saturday morning.

    Florida Division of Emergency Management Director Craig Fugate asked residents of the Keys to stay in their homes or, if they have left their homes, to wait until authorities give an all-clear before trying to return.

    Residents of the Florida Panhandle, he said, still have time to evacuate, but "today, you need to act. There is no longer an option that you can hope this storm away."

    Residents of Alabama and northwest Florida braced for a projected hit from the powerful storm Sunday afternoon, less than a year after Hurricane Ivan brought destruction to the region along the same path. Much of that damage has yet to be repaired.

    The governors of four states -- Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana -- declared states of emergency, and evacuations began in low-lying areas and barrier islands, including a number of popular beach resorts.

    The three-day forecast projection for Dennis has the storm striking Sunday afternoon near Pensacola, Florida.

    However, such predictions often change because of the unpredictable nature of a hurricane's movement.

    Early Saturday, a hurricane warning was issued for portions of the northeastern Gulf Coast, from the Louisiana-Mississippi state line to the mouth of Florida's Steinhatchee River, east of Tallahassee.

    A hurricane warning also remained in effect for the lower Keys, south of the Seven Mile Bridge, with the upper Keys under a tropical storm warning.

    A hurricane warning means hurricane conditions are expected in the area within 24 hours.

    A tropical storm warning was posted for much of Florida's west coast, from east of the Steinhatchee River southward, around the bottom of the peninsula and up the state's east coast to Golden Beach in Miami-Dade County.

    And a tropical storm warning was issued for the southeastern Louisiana coast, from the Mississippi state line west to Grand Isle. The warning includes New Orleans and Lake Pontchartrain.

    More than 1,100 workers were evacuated from offshore oil platforms in the Gulf of Mexico in the path of the storm. The U.S. Navy and Air Force also moved ships, aircraft and personnel out of bases in the Florida Panhandle.

    In Washington, the Federal Emergency Management Agency has begun sending supplies such as ice, water and plastic sheeting to storm-threatened Southern states. Disaster medical assistance teams also have been deployed.

    CNN's Lucia Newman in Havana and Eric Fiegel, Randy Kaye, Kathleen Koch, Mike Mount and Patrick Oppmann contributed to this report
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    At the 7pm report (07-09) Dennis is now back to 115mph w/140mph gusts. It is predicted to gain strength and be near to or well into Category 4, or 131mph+, somewhere near Mobile Bay. Stay safe brothers... this one is not playing games.

    I am a Hugo survivor... so I feel your pain.
    Last edited by sconfire; 07-10-2005 at 06:09 AM.
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    Stay safe down there guys (and gals)
    We struck down evil with the mighty sword of teamwork and the hammer of not bickering.

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    Stay safe!
    May we never forget our fallen, worldwide.

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    At the 5am report Dennis has surpassed forecasters predictions and has grown to 145+mph in less than 12hrs. This is a very, very strong CAT4 monster. It has nothing but warm water to drive it until it hits land.

    Stay safe...
    Last edited by sconfire; 07-10-2005 at 06:27 AM.
    Always remember the CHARLESTON 9

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    To all my friends in the South of the US, stay safe I will be thinking of you all during this worrying time.
    United Kingdom branch, IACOJ.

  22. #22
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    Unhappy This is going to be ugly ...

    Grant is right, this is a monster. Scary *****! Be smart, be safe!



    Hurricane Dennis roars toward U.S. Gulf Coast
    CTV.ca News Staff

    Hurricane Dennis closed in on the U.S. Gulf Coast on Sunday after intensifying into a dangerous Category 4 storm -- the second-highest on the scale.

    The storm is roaring toward a region still recovering from the damage another hurricane left less than a year ago.

    With nearly 1.4 million people under evacuation orders, some towns in the projected path were nearly deserted.

    The hurricane, which has already claimed 32 lives in Cuba and Haiti, is expected to hit landfall Sunday afternoon, somewhere along the coast of the Florida Panhandle, Alabama or Mississippi.

    After weakening to a Category 2 storm over Cuba, Dennis became a Category 4 storm early Sunday, with sustained winds of 233 kilometres/h.

    "Category 4 is not just a little bit worse - it's much worse," Max Mayfield, director of the National Hurricane Center in Miami told The Associated Press

    "Damage increases exponentially as the wind speed increases. And no matter where it makes actual landfall, it's going to have a tremendous impact well away from the center."

    The hurricane centre has no record of a storm of this magnitude ever hitting Florida's Panhandle or Alabama.

    But for some Floridians bracing for the hurricane, whose homes were pummelled by Hurricane Ivan last year, it's a storm that is all too familiar.

    "I think there is a legitimate feeling, 'Why me? What did I do wrong?'" Florida Gov. Jeb Bush said.

    Before entering the Gulf, Dennis brushed into the Florida Keys, flooding streets and knocking out power.

    The impact was severe in Key West, where fallen branches, street signs and other debris littered the streets.

    But the damage was not as bad as it could have been, with the of the hurricane passing about 200 kilometres to the west of Key West.

    "We were lucky, no doubt about it," Jim Hendrick AP as he picked up branches in front of his house.

    Residents who evacuated the lower Keys were asked to keep away until Sunday.

    As night fell Saturday, the first rains began falling on Fort Walton Beach.

    In Alabama, about 500,000 people were under evacuation orders, as were 700,000 in Florida and 190,000 in Mississippi.

    Highways were jammed as people fled inland from the coasts of Florida, Alabama and Louisiana.

    Dennis is the strongest Atlantic hurricane to form so early in the season since records began in 1851. The season runs from June 1 to Nov. 30.

    The hurricane was responsible for as many as 32 deaths in Haiti and Cuba earlier this week.

    It struck Cuba with such ferocity on Friday, President Fidel Castro described it as "diabolical."

    Dennis is following the path of Hurricane Ivan, which struck last year and caused 29 deaths and $4 billion US damage in the Panhandle alone.

    That hurricane along with two others tore through the Caribbean in 2004, killing hundreds of people and causing billions of dollars in damage.

    Hardest hit was Haiti, which is vulnerable to flash floods and mudslides. Last year, about 60,000 people died in floods in May and September.
    September 11th - Never Forget

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  23. #23
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    I posted this on another thread, but it's worth repeating.
    Go to www.nhc.noaa.gov/ for up to the minute info, without the "Entertainment" BS of the commercial Broadcast system.
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    i live in the middle of the state and got hit 3-4 last year. we felt the outter bands so far and i'm nervous for those on the tip. plus a couple of counties on the west of the state got hit pretty hard yestarday. stay safe everyone.

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    Not too bad here. Steady wind at 30-35 with gusts over 50. Its been raining since Friday night and we've got some costal flooding. Minor damage, some roofs off, trees down and so on. Havent been out on the beach but Im sure a lot of sand is gone. But Ill take that over what their going to get north of here.
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