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  1. #41
    MembersZone Subscriber F18Wub's Avatar
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    My main issue of contention here is that in the "101 Secrets" there is a link to a site which advocate cheating to pass the polygraph. If you have to cheat to pass a poly, I don't want to work with you. Apparently, nothing does count until you have the badge, including honesty during the process.
    Last edited by F18Wub; 07-20-2005 at 07:57 PM.
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  2. #42
    Forum Member JackTee09's Avatar
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    F18WUB:

    Apparently you found what many people are finding after looking at the site. It is as George Wendt stated!
    Jacktee

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    "Insert quotation here."

  3. #43
    MembersZone Subscriber F18Wub's Avatar
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    I do think that there are some interesting concepts on there, but can't understand circumventing the process. The process is there for a reason, chances are if you have to lie on the poly, something will trip in the background to toss you. I passed my polygraphs the old fashioned way, telling the truth, and keeping my nose clean in my youth to make sure I could do what I wanted.
    IACOJ, Flatlander Division

  4. #44
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    Kind of ironic in this thread, or on these forums, that someone would complain about the treatment of youngsters.

  5. #45
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    Default How soon you forget?

    but can't understand circumventing the process.

    I believe in preparing for every step in the hiring process before you get there. I think many who are responding on this thread have been on the job long enough that they have forgotten how tough it is or might not know how difficult it is today to make it through the maze.

    After you have jumped through all the flaming hoops you donít want to be caught flat-footed for the remaining steps in the hiring process.

    Is it circumventing the process to prepare for the written and physical agility portions of the testing process? You can spin this anyway you want. But ask yourself if you would you show up without preparing for the written? Not in shape for the physical agility? Have you discovered you just canít wing the oral? Then, why doesnít it make since to prepare for the remaining portions of the hiring process, the background, psych, poly and medical?

    I do think that there are some interesting concepts on there

    Thank you

    My main issue of contention here is that in the "101 Secrets" http://eatstress.com/faq.htm there is a link to a site which advocate cheating to pass the polygraph.

    Really? So with over 250 pages of free information on the web site youíre stuck on the notion that there is a link to a web site that advocates cheating, not educating yourself on what to expect in the poly?

    Exploder805 wrote:

    One of the questions on many (if not most/all) polygraph tests is "have you read or sought out information on 'how to beat a polygraph'?"....

    Well, not always.

    What FF/PM1 Wrote here is what I believe and encourage candidates to understand:

    Yes, I was asked if I had researched polygraphs in my pre-interview, but not in the actual polygraph exam. The examiner asked me why I researched polygraphs? Was I going to manipulate it? I said of course not, but I always study before going into a test, I knew nothing about polygraphs prior to my hiring process and wanted to know what they are about.

    While I am a big advocate of honesty in the hiring process, I am also an advocate on RESEARCH prior to entering into a new portion of the hiring process.

    This does not make you a "cheater" or "dishonest" for wanting to know what you are getting yourself into, just thorough.

    I researched every step of my hiring process. I learned everything I could about interviews, medicals, psych exams, polygraphs, backgrounds...not because I was trying to manipulate the system with deception or dishonesty, but I wanted to know what is next.

    Honesty was the foundation of everything during my hiring process. I used this formula.....

    If asked, a truthful answer was always given.

    If asked a question, I would answer the question honestly then be quiet.

    All other times I sat there with my mouth shut.

    I have had friends fail polygraphs, not because they were dishonest, but they were not educated for what they were getting into. They sat down and were honest, but when answering one of the polygrpaher's questions, they would answer the question and then ADD additional info not even asked for. This ultimately led to their demise.

    Learning about a polygraph does not mean I am trying to cheat it. Were you trying to cheat by going to fire stations and finding out what types of questions may be asked on the oral interview? No, you just wanted to be prepared.

    Be honest, be prepared and be consistent.
    Last edited by CaptBob; 07-20-2005 at 11:58 PM.
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  6. #46
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    You see, cheating on the polygraph is fine. Lying about DUI's is fine. Anything else you have to do is fine, because the end justifies the means.

    There is a valuable service he is providing here. Do you know that there are hundreds of FD's across the country that cannot find qualified applicants? Would you want to crawl down a blazing hallway alone simply because too few people bought Bobby's services? He may be the fire service savior!

  7. #47
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    Default How does this make sence?

    As witnessed above, when you don't agree with George he becomes a distillery of meanness.

    George will probably take this as a compliment.

  8. #48
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    when you don't agree with George he becomes a distillery of meanness.

    Gee Cap'n Bobby - would you rather be known as mean or as a snake oil salesman?

    Cap'n Bobby further states:

    Really? So with over 250 pages of free information on the web site youíre stuck on the notion that there is a link to a web site that advocates cheating, not educating yourself on what to expect in the poly?
    Yes Bobby - because you know it is there-you know it is wrong-and yet you do nothing. That is technically known as "Mutt" level stuff, or, perhaps in the world of professional "coaches" it is simply business as usual.
    Last edited by JackTee09; 07-21-2005 at 02:49 PM.
    Jacktee

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  9. #49
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    Default Snake oil salesman?

    JackTee09 wrote:
    You take advantage - which is not something that a brother would ever do.

    Are college, medic academy programs free? Do the instructors get paid? Are the books free? Hardly.

    Which is not something that a brother would ever do.

    Do you realize youíre on a commercial web site that many positions are staffed with in service firefighters? Take a look around this page. Are there advertisements? Are they free? Links to web sites that could be owned or staffed by off duty firefighters. There are sections you canít go into on this site unless you subscribe. And those subscription services are a bargain, full of valuable information. Most authored by firefighters.

    Which is not something that a brother would ever do.

    Why is it that candidates will pay big money for college programs, certification classes, EMT programs, books, fire academies, paramedic programs, put their life, relations and other careers on hold for a fire career?

    Which is not something that a brother would ever do.

    Then, there seems to be something sinister or wrong for someone to provide a service or develop and sell products for the part of the hiring process that is 100% of your score to get hired.

    The vast majority of those who visit our web site only utilize the ton of free services. I work with candidates all the time that never spent a dime on our programs. They utilized the FREE information off our web site, have phone calls and e-mail messages answered in helping them pursuit their badge.

    Is it taking advantage or giving candidates an advantage?

    Yes, we have products. We donít hold a gun to any ones head to buy them. Do any of the classes or programs offer a refund if youíre not satisfied? Nope. We do. We offer a no questions asked full refund if someone is not satisfied with our products. We will refund their money and misery. No on has ever lost a penny with our products.

    Captain Bob

    www.eatstress.com

  10. #50
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    Default this is my problem

    NEVER FAIL A POLYGRAPH TEST!

    TAKE CHARGE OF YOUR CHART!


    Learn how to ALWAYS pass with my manual, training video/DVD and my expert personal consultation!

    It is a very serious mistake to believe that you will pass your polygraph or CVSA tests just because you are telling the truth - they are not "lie detectors". Scientific research proves that simple nervousness will cause a truthful person to fail! What that means is that over 50% of honest, truthful people will FAIL their tests just because they are nervous!

    Don't let that happen to you! I can teach you how to ALWAYS PASS even if you are nervous, (or lying) - no matter what...GUARANTEED!


    Capt Bob.
    I must admit that I personally used your free advice on these forums to help me through the interview process. And I thank you for that but I do have a real problem when you send people to a website that has the above lead in. The website is www.polygraph.com. I have seen you advise people to use this site. I find it abhorrent that as a Retired firefighter you would refer someone to a web page that advocates lying and cheating. If you want to assist future firemen in their quest for a badge this is not the site to do it. Why not come up with your own system that teaches the prospective firemen how to be calm and honest and not speak to much. I personally don't care if you make money off of people that want to pursue this career. That is the American way. Far be it from me to stifle capitalism. BUT.....your endorsement of this website should stop.
    I am fairly new to the forums here and I do see that both you and George have said and done things to try to help others. Each in your own way. I don't necessarily agree with George on all issues. I think he is brash and sometimes carries a chip on his shoulder. But I do know from what he posts that he is concerned about the state of affairs in the Fire world. He wants Firemen to be thought of as honest, Reliable, and trustworthy. Teaching people how to cheat and lie only denegrates this profession.
    I am sure I can add more but I think I will leave it alone for now. This is my .02 worth.

  11. #51
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    Default Not a day at the beach

    Received this a few days ago. Be prepared for every step in the hiring process before you get there so you know what to expect.

    Captain Bob,

    I am writing today with hopes that you can explain a few things in relation to the polygraph examination. Last week I was subject to an oral board examination and a polygraph for fire department. I was very excited about my interview because I knew that I was going to nail it, which is exactly what I did. After completion of my interview I was moved onto fitting for turnout gear after which I was moved onto my "lie detector" test.

    The test started off with the polygraph explaining the test and assuring me that as long as I "tell the truth" I have nothing to worry about. I have no skeletons in the closet and have a completely clean background (no drugs, no crimes, etc.). I willingly submitted to the test.

    After the explanation of the test the polygraph handed me an approx. 8-page packet which contained a waiver, the ten questions to be asked on the polygraph test, and several "have you ever committed _____" questions. I filled out this packet of information and waited my turn to "test." After a few minutes the candidate who was being polygraphed before me came out and the polygraph evaluator led me into a private office to conduct the "test."

    Immediately the polygraph started to patronize me. He mocked my signature and commenced to interrogate me as to why I want to be a firefighter. I assumed at first that his curiosity was just trivial, but when I told him that I was trying to attain my dream job he started to mock this as well. After the hazing was completed he progressed to ask me pertinent questions that related to my background. I told him of the few things that I have done wrong and we commenced the polygraph "test."

    During this test he would not allow me to take a deep breath nor would he allow me to open my eyes. He told me "if you don't close your eyes I wont do this test" and "no more deep breaths or I wont continue the test."

    Additionally he changed the questions that were supposed to be asked on the "examination" to take new forms. I completed the test and was unhooked from the machine. We had a casual discussion of no significance and he escorted me from the room.

    As I exited the room he asked, "do you have a sense of humor?" I replied "yes." As I stepped into the hallway from which the room was accessed there was another candidate and several employees of the fire-rescue division standing outside "shooting the breeze." I shook hands with a few of the employees and candidates that I recognized and started to head for the exit. As I was walking away the polygraph said "hey Steve, stay off of the marijuana!"

    As previously mentioned I have NEVER consumed any illegal narcotic, including marijuana. I was so humiliated by his comment that I couldn't even turn around to make any sort of retort to his remarks. I exited the building and went home.

    I have spent years preparing for this opportunity and I am terrified that some jerk just ruined my chances of the career that I have dreamed about for years. In addition, if this "gentleman" is in the wrong do I have any recourse?

    Be prepared for every step in the hiring process before you get there so you know what to expect.

    Captain Bob

    www.eatstress.com

  12. #52
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    Default what has this to do with the price of rice in China?

    What does this have to do with the previous comments. If you think that anyone regardless of how well your compatriot in "how to beat the lie detector" could prepare anyone for this. I scream BS. This poly examiner waas and is way out of line. This gentleman has got to let it be known what occurred. The examiners actions were unethical at best and probably illegal. This still does not justify telling people how to lie and cheat on the polygraph. Answer what has been laid before you. How do you justify teaching or assisting in teaching people how to lie on their poly and get away with it. I know that you do not believe in the technical aspects of the Polygraph but that does not justify helping people to cheat it.
    Are you willing to take responsiblity if some pedophile uses this system to get into the fire service to gain trust and access of children. I think not. Remove your endoresment of this guy. Its the ethical thing to do. For the honor of the service.
    "Nothing counts until you earn the badge truthfully"

  13. #53
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    Thumbs up I wish more people had taken advantage of me while I was testing

    In the spring I took a swift-water rescue class that was taught by off duty firefighters, who were paid very well for their services. I am now on the departments rescue team. I paid $200 and drove 400 miles to take a class on cutting up new cars last winter. It was taught by off duty firefighters who were paid for their time.

    Was I taken advantage of? Should those people who are firefighters, or are helping people to get hired, promoted or get special training, not charge for their time and materials? I wish that materials like that were around when I was testing, Iím sure I would have been hired sooner; oral boards arenít my strong suit.

    But I did get a book and materials on passing the written tests. Was the person that sold it to me taking advantage of me? Or was he helping me ďCHEATĒ the written test? If you can read something on a web site, or buy something to watch, and beat a polygraph, I would have to say they donít work very well.

    After all of this, I talked to the three guys on my shift that used Capt Bobís stuff, and they couldnít say enough good stuff about him. In fact, one of the guys said he had called Capt Bobís ď888Ē number a bunch of times with questions, and he answered the phone every time and helped him a lot. He never bought any of the stuff from him and he still helped and never asked if he had bought anything. Itís real easy to give opinions, but hearing from the people who were ďtaken advantage ofĒ doesnít seem to back up your criticisms.

  14. #54
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    Capt Bob is my father. I find it hard to believe that an allegation of taking advantage of people has been made against him. He has spent most of retirement helping people get hired and promoted with excellent results. I donít hear any of those people complaining. If somebody could just explain to me, how is it possible to take advantage of a person, when you give a 100% money back grantee? No questions asked, and to the best of my knowledge no one has ever taken advantage of it. I offer the same and I know no one has asked me for one.
    Last edited by FFighterRob; 07-21-2005 at 09:14 PM.

  15. #55
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    Iím as concerned as anyone about hiring the right candidates. I do not encourage candidates to cheat or lie only to be prepared in advanced of every step of the hiring process. Youíre a free agent. Prepare for the testing process what ever way works best for you. The link to polygraph.com is one of many resources for candidates. Iím not affiliated in anyway with their program.

    If polygraphs are so great why arenít the results admissible in court cases? Criminologists say lie detector tests pass 10 percent of the liars and fail 20 percent of the truth-tellers.

    If you were one of the many candidates I hear from that ďclaimĒ they told the truth in their polygraph and failed you would be angry too.

    I talked to a candidate the other night who just took a polygraph and failed. The evaluator kept hammering him about reactions he was receiving. The questions surrounded him of not only being a drug dealer but a pimp. He said nothing could be farther from the truth. How would that make you feel if you were telling the truth?

    The first time I ever had contact and talked to Paul was 45 minutes after he got the call that he had failed his poly. Needless to say he was devastated. When I asked him what he had done to prepare for his polygraph he said he used the free information from some of the ďexpertsĒ on this forum. Using those guidelines he said he went in and spilled his guts, just like going to confession.

    Just a few minutes into our conversation he realized that he had become too familiar with the evaluator, got chatty, volunteered too much beyond what was requested, was really nervous but thought everything was going just great.

    Paul wrote:
    The next test I take, I assure you, I will be better prepared.

    According to Doug Williamson a 35-year veteran polygraph evaluator from www.polygraph.com ďIt is a very serious mistake to believe that you will pass your polygraph or CVSA tests just because you are telling the truth - they are not "lie detectors". Scientific research proves that simple nervousness will cause a truthful person to fail!Ē

    I talked to Scott after he checked out polygraph.com. He realized he had not been as prepared as he could have been before his polygraph. If he had it to do over again he would have been better prepare in understanding the process before his evaluation and could have had a better opportunity of passing without compromising his truthfulness as others are referring to here.

    Are Polygraph Tests Lying to Us?
    This article is from the Baltimore Sun. It should give you an insight to the polygraph delimma:

    Tests: Mixed reading of Lee's nuclear secret data, federal
    employee opposition to taking lie detectors 'reignite'
    80-year-old controversy.

    By Michael Stroh
    Sun Staff

    When physicist Wen Ho Lee first denied
    leaking U.S. nuclear secrets to the Chinese, authorities from
    the Department of Energy in 1998 wired him to a polygraph
    to see if he was lying.

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist passed.

    But when a polygraph expert from the FBI looked at the
    same test results later, he concluded that Lee had not told
    the truth.

    How could the same lie detector test lead investigators to
    exactly opposite conclusions?

    The case of Lee, who eventually pleaded guilty to one
    felony count of mishandling classified information, has left
    law enforcement experts trying to answer the same
    fundamental questions that have existed since the invention
    of the lie detector 80 years ago: Does the polygraph
    actually work? And is it fair?

    "It's reignited this smoldering controversy," says Steven
    Aftergood, a senior research analyst with the Federation of
    American Scientists in Washington. In an essay being
    published today in the journal Science, Aftergood argues
    that a new federal policy requiring nearly 20,000
    employees of the national nuclear weapons laboratories to
    take lie detector tests is having undesirable effects.

    The policy has lowered morale, Aftergood writes, and
    caused some of the nation's most gifted scientists to leave,
    and made it harder for the labs to recruit talented young
    researchers for the weapons programs. The use of the
    polygraph, he writes, "symbolizes the defeat of reason by
    the national security state."

    Despite such criticisms, the use of the polygraph test is on
    the rise.

    Congress banned private industry's use of lie detectors as a
    condition of employment in 1988, but they are routinely
    used for employee screening at the FBI, Central Intelligence
    Agency, National Security Agency and local police
    departments around the country. The percentage of law
    enforcement agencies using polygraphs for this purpose
    rose from 16 percent in 1962 to 62 percent in 1999,
    according to a survey by Michigan State University's
    School of Criminal Justice.

    There's also a growing market for polygraphs outside law
    enforcement. The American Polygraph Association, the
    largest polygraph accrediting and licensing organization in
    the country, reports that its membership has risen past 2,000
    and is continuing to grow.

    Private polygraph examiners handle everything from fishing
    tournaments to divorce cases. Winners of the annual Big
    Rock Blue Marlin Tournament in Morehead City, N.C., for
    example, must submit to a polygraph before collecting any
    prize money (to make sure they haven't stuffed rocks in the
    gut of their prize catch).

    Lie detectors aren't designed to detect lies as much as the
    subtle physical changes that may occur when a person tells
    a lie. The word "polygraph" means "many writings," and
    that is what the polygraph machine produces: lots of
    squiggly lines on a scrolling piece of paper.

    The test works like this: A subject is seated in a chair. Two
    rubber belts are wrapped around his chest and stomach to
    measure breathing patterns. A blood pressure cuff is
    wrapped around an arm. A metal plate attached to the
    fingers measures sweat gland activity.

    The polygraph examiner then asks the person a series of
    questions. Some of the queries are "control" questions
    unrelated to the matter under investigation but establish a
    base line of the person's blood pressure, respiration and
    perspiration. Other questions directly address the actions
    under scrutiny.

    The examiner interprets the person's physiological response
    to each of the questions, as recorded on scrolling paper, to
    judge whether the person is lying. And thus the uncertainty
    about polygraph results: they are a matter of judgment.
    "There's no red light or siren that comes on when the person
    lies," says Milton O. "Skip" Webb Jr., president of the
    American Polygraph Association.

    The roots of the modern lie detector stretch back to
    antiquity. Like modern methods, early techniques to ferret
    out lies often relied on the behavior exhibited by liars -
    sweaty palms, dry mouth, shifting gaze, racing pulse.

    In China, for example, suspected liars were fed a handful of
    dry rice. If they could spit it out, the thinking went, they
    were telling the truth. If the rice stuck to their tongue, they
    must have something to hide.

    The modern quest to detect liars using technology began
    with Cesare Lombroso, an Italian criminologist who in
    1895 published a book called "The Criminal Man" in which
    he described his efforts using an early instrument to
    measure changes in blood pressure to determine whether
    several criminal suspects had lied.

    In 1915, Harvard psychologist William Moulton Marston
    picked up on these early studies and devised a primitive lie
    detector based on blood pressure. According to
    psychologist and polygraph historian David Lykken, it was
    Marston, a colorful P.T. Barnum-like character, who was
    among the first to realize the lie detector's commercial
    possibilities.

    In 1938, Look magazine described how Marston sometimes
    used his lie detection techniques in marital counseling. He
    also showed up in full-page ads testfying to the close shave
    offered by Gillette razors: "New Facts about Shaving
    Revealed by Lie Detector!" (Using the pen name "Charles
    Moulton," Marston would also invent the comic strip
    character Wonder Woman, whose magic lasso could force
    those held to tell the truth. )

    But John A. Larson, a Berkeley, Calif., police officer, is the
    person generally credited with inventing the modern
    polygraph machine. In 1921, Larson, who eventually
    became a doctor, devised an instrument that could
    simultaneously record blood pressure, pulse and
    respiration. Later tinkerers improved upon Larson's design
    by adding sensors to measure perspiration.

    Over the years scientists have tried to determine whether
    the polygraph actually works. But accurate studies are hard
    to do. "The science is not solid," says Aftergood, in part
    because investigators can rarely learn independently
    whether a subject who passed a polygraph test was indeed
    telling the truth.

    In some studies, volunteers are recruited to be pretend
    criminals and then subjected to a lie detector test. But the
    results of such work, critics argue, don't mimic reality. "It's
    impossible to make the stakes as high in an experiment as
    they are in real life," says Aftergood.

    Still, proponents of the polygraph argue the device is
    accurate in better than 90 percent of cases, and note that it's
    not uncommon for other types of test results to be open to
    interpretation.

    "Your doctor can have you take a chest X-ray and say, 'I
    don't see anything.' Then he sends it over to a radiologist
    and the radiologist finds something the first doctor doesn't
    see," says Webb. "Happens all the time."

    But enough guilty people have slipped past the polygraph to
    have given law enforcement officials pause. Most federal
    and state courts do not allow polygraph results to be
    entered as evidence.

    CIA employee Aldrich Ames, for example, passed lie
    detector tests despite selling U.S. secrets to the Russians
    for more than eight years. There's also a mini-industry of
    Internet sites and books such as "Deception Detection:
    Winning the Polygraph Game" that purport to teach people
    how to beat the test.

    "College students with 15 minutes of explanation can beat
    the lie detector," says David Lykken, a retired psychologist
    from the University of Minnesota. "Anybody who is
    working as a spy has been taught how to beat the
    polygraph." The advertised techniques range from curling
    one's toes to biting one's tongue during control questions to
    mislead the examiner.

    Still, even critics of the polygraph acknowledge that it has
    led to admissions of guilt that they might not otherwise have
    gotten.

    "The polygraph itself functions as a prop more than anything
    else," says Aftergood. "Yet, there are cases every year in
    which the prop works."

    By Michael Stroh
    Sun Staff

    Captain Bob

    www.eatstress.com
    Last edited by CaptBob; 07-21-2005 at 10:03 PM.

  16. #56
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    I dont think that jacktee and wendy have been involved in too many entry level FF exams as of lately, seeing that the pool of canidates are only getting more qualified then they were years ago.

    Oral boards make the cream rise to the top and if I choosen to use Capt Bob on my first oral I would have passed it instead of being one of the 50% that didnt.

    Second oral board was quite different after using Capt Bob. He showed me a different way at preparing for the oral board that I didnt do the first time and now I'm in striking range of that badge instead of wondering why I wasnt considered for the job.

    Jacktee and Wendy are pretty much grasping at straws here and being naive and very immature. Did you guys even check out his material before labeling it or just going blind to the touch?
    Wendy they're plenty of other individuals on this website that need to be turned in cause of there wrong doing, GO GET EM BROTHER..

    anyways Bobs the man, he doesnt me to defend him, his reputation exceeds everything else.

    FFighterRob, what up?? lol nice to meet the legend...

  17. #57
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    Bobby, Bobby, Bobby, you are a pathetic soul.

    You compare your "tons of free stuff" to formal college level fire and rescue training? You compare your get-rich-quick scheme type of crap to formal certifications? Who in the world do you think you are talking to here? This is about as intellectually dishonest as it can be. If you are going to come here and debate, at least be friggin' prepared with something better than that.

    Your disdain for the polygraph has been widely known. Despite all of your citing of propaganda materials, your motivs here are transparent. You are coaching these kids to cheat. You publish one or two letters from peoplpe who failed a poly, yet there are hundreds of people every week who pass public safety polys and are hired-ostensibly w/o your help. Why? Because they told the truth. And telling the truth would be exactly the advice I would give anyone who asked me what to do with the polygraph.

    "Nothing matters until you have the badge" or whatever your mantra is, is a statement by you that the end justifies the means. You do whatever you have to do. Just don't get caught (DUI advice). That is tantamount to cheating.

    Your integrity shows in the way you treat these forums. There is explicit int he TOS a statement that says, in part:
    Any posts which ...include commercial messages...your Firehouse.com account may be terminated without warning.
    Yet you blantantly hawk your wares on thi site. I have no idea why the WT doesn't do something. Perhaps yo have a "wink-wink, nod-nod" agreement because you are a contributor, I don't know. But it is wrong. No one else is allowed to do it.

    100% money back guarantees don't mean squat. If a kid follows your unethical advice and gets booted from the process, getting the money back he wasted on your tapes and books is a hollow gesture.

    You are finding that there are many who feel as I do. You want to call me mean, go ahead, but I amm far from mean. Chip on my shoulder? Yup. When things are wrong. I call 'em as I see 'em. And if you are breaking the rules, I have a chip on my shoulder for you. And I have no intention of letting it rest.

  18. #58
    Forum Member JackTee09's Avatar
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    Bravo George. And despite the parade of "satisfied" customers he is bringing out - including his own son - there are more and more people who are starting to question the service. I wonder if Bob ever had an oral interview for Battalion Chief? If so - he must have had problems.

    As it stands now I have completed my last post here. Cheers!
    Jacktee

    IACOJ

    "Insert quotation here."

  19. #59
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    I really donít know what the motivation is for people to criticize others that they donít know. Maybe jealousy?

    Lets agree on a few things. It appears this guy ďGeorgeĒ would like everyone to know that Capt Bob sells stuff. He does. Itís a fact and you can now let it go because we all agree about that. Capt Bob says ďGeorgeĒ follows him around. He does. In the last few days of reading posts here I find it comical, both the regularity of his postings after anything about or by Capt Bob, and the repetition of what he says. Itís just the same thing over and over. I really donít know why Capt Bob even responds to him. We all have people that may not care for us. I prefer to ignore them. The opinion of a retired inspector from New Jersey that lives in this website is not an opinion in looking to help shape my life.

    Obviously Capt Bob is allowed to do what he does, because he still does. I am willing to bet that after every post Capt Bob has made this year, George has clicked upon the ďReport this post to a moderatorĒ button to report it.

    I asked the question above ď how can one be taken advantage of when there is a 100% money back grantee?Ē Well George explain how you make that allegation.

    Here is the funny thing about the B/C test. Capt Bob took it and acted for a while, but didnít want the job. He and one other guy didnít take the next test. Every one that did failed. So for a long time, until they could give another test, he was the only guy working as B/C on his shift.

  20. #60
    Forum Member JackTee09's Avatar
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    Default Laughing way too much!

    Here is the funny thing about the B/C test. Capt Bob took it and acted for a while, but didnít want the job.
    I said I would not comment anymore...but this is too much. That is a very rich answer - I mean the entire thing is ludicrous. What? He wanted it enough to take the test but then turned it down to concentrate on...motivation for others to pass written and oral tests. This has the makings of an excellent, 1200 word article. Priceless. Just priceless. Thank you ROB for that bit of information.
    Jacktee

    IACOJ

    "Insert quotation here."

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