1. #26
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    Now as far as using the contamination card to prevent house #1 from closing I suggest you find another battle because this one won't hold an ounce of water in the courts.
    That brings me back to my question above as to where this new station would be in relation to the old one. Who's homes and businesses will be affected by the firestation being closed and moved? Since one of the factors in determing insurance rates for homes and businesses is the level of fire protection you are receiving, if the station that was 3 minutes away from you is now 10 minutes away, you have less protection. One would think that the politians first priority would be what is in the best interests of the public not in some political agenda (and there is always a politial agenda)..


    Jeff-

    Yes I took the time to go to the brownfields site and also asked my instructor for a bit more information as she is a scientist and environemtnal waste is an area that she has worked extensively in. I wil ltake the time to look further into this but at the same time, why close a good fire station to build a new one? There has to be something the public is not being told as it does not make sense. (oops, did I say politicans were supposed to make sense?).

  2. #27
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    Default It happens...another "tainted" site...

    TOMS RIVER Shady Lane resident Bill Webb had a message for the Dover Township Council: don't allow any redevelopment on the former Ciba-Geigy Corp. Superfund site for many years.

    Webb, who used to work at the now-closed Ciba plant, was reacting to news that Ciba Specialty Chemicals Corp., which now owns the 1,350-acre property, has hired a Manhattan planning firm that has prepared a conceptual plan for the redevelopment of the site.

    "You shouldn't even consider redevelopment until about 10 years down the road," Webb told the council Tuesday night. "You can stop it."

    The Ciba property off Route 37 West is zoned for industrial use, and a zoning change would be required to permit construction of retail and office space or residential housing on the site. Such a change would have to be approved by the Township Council, Council President Gregory P. McGuckin said.

    "We have no intention of changing anything right now," McGuckin said. "We are trying to do everything we can to try to gain as much control as possible over that site."

    Earlier this year, the council requested that the township Planning Board begin looking into whether the Ciba site should be considered an area in need of redevelopment. The board is soliciting proposals from planning firms interested in studying the property.

    Should the board declare the site an area in need of redevelopment, the council would then decide whether to supervise the redevelopment on its own or create an independent redevelopment authority. Either move could take control of the property's future development away from Ciba Specialty Chemicals, whose officials have insisted a redevelopment authority is not necessary.

    Last week, Ciba spokeswoman Donna M. Jakubowski said the company hopes township officials and residents, as well as members of the business community, can work together to create a redevelopment plan for the property.

    The conceptual plan for the land prepared by HLW International LLP shows about 900 acres of developable land. The plan, presented to the Toms River-Ocean County Chamber of Commerce, includes some 400 acres set aside for residential housing; 200 acres of mixed retail and office use; 200 acres for a golf course; and at least 150 acres along the Toms River that would be dedicated parkland.

    Camelot Drive resident Carol A. Benson said she was upset that the conceptual plan was presented at a chamber meeting held at Community Medical Center.

    "I'm kind of annoyed with the chamber of commerce for sitting down with Ciba," Benson said, "and sitting down with them in a private location where the public is not invited."

    ----------------------------------------------

    This are used to be a Ciba Geigy chemical plant. Big history of contamination and cleaning of the area going on. Plans now are for taking the now (almost) cleaned property and developing in residential housing, golf, etc.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  3. #28
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    Bones,
    Let me say this, comparing a superfund site to a brownfields site is like comparing chlorine gas to bleach. (A poor analogy but the best I can come up with) The infamous Love Canal and surrounding properites were a superfund site, currently there are residences on the site of the houses condemned due to contamination. The actual site of the dump is still fenced off and will remain so for a long time.

    Brownfields have a low level of contamination, which is relatively easy to remediate. Often the brownfields once remediated are cleaner than the surrounding properties, but due to past problems with contaminated sites being zoned for residential use (ie Love Canal ) you wont see any town opening themselves up to the risk however small it may be. The assumption is that once the town zones the property residential and it is developed, the occupants of the residence will attempt to sue the town for any medical costs that may arise due to the site having been contaminated, in reality none of those illnesses are associated with the removed contamination, but the town will either end up paying through the nose for lawyers or in settlements. So they take the easy way out and make it so that it cannot be used for a school, or zoned residential.
    Shawn M. Cecula
    Firefighter
    IACOJ Division of Fire and EMS

  4. #29
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    Lewiston2Capt, as far as I am aware, the "Superfund" site is not what is being cleaned up and redeveloped, it's the outside the superfund site where there is "less hazardous"? tainted soil.

    I may have missed it, but does anyone know what the proposed site in VA is/was contaminated with?
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  5. #30
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    Originally posted by Bones42
    Lewiston2Capt, as far as I am aware, the "Superfund" site is not what is being cleaned up and redeveloped, it's the outside the superfund site where there is "less hazardous"? tainted soil.

    I may have missed it, but does anyone know what the proposed site in VA is/was contaminated with?
    From the article it said that there was a dry cleaning establishment on the property, which probably means Tetrachloroethylene (TCE), and dichloroethylene (DCE) contamination, and other chlorinated organic solvents associated with dry cleaning before their use was banned, it also says that a gas station was there with the usual gasoline and waste oil contamination being the probable culprit there, quantity must be limited due to the brownsfield declaration, my guess would be some digging and some bacterial remediation and the site will be good as new.
    Shawn M. Cecula
    Firefighter
    IACOJ Division of Fire and EMS

  6. #31
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    Default site in VA

    The site in Virginia is contaminated with an old underground gas tank from an old gas station as well as dumping from an old dry cleaning business.

    The fact of the matter is the station is 100 years old and a very historical building.

    Houses all the amenities of a new station.
    It is in great condition.
    They FF's like working there.
    The public likes to visit.
    The new site is about 7 blocks away.
    The station is being built on a "Brown Field".
    The new site is at the corner of a busy intersection. I mean right on the corner.
    The citizens do not realize that it will be gone.

    FFTide say what you will, you have your opinion. However think about this one. The new station doesn't even have a diesel exhaust system in the plans. The other stations have at best an attic fan, the station I work at has nothing to that effect.

    We demand better working conditions, not being made to live on a site that environment organizations say is not healthy to have your kids play on for 8 hours at a time. They want us to live a third of our lives there. You may not feel the same as me and that is fine, however I value my life and the people in it to take someones(City Official)word for it, when they obviously don't care much for us anyways.

  7. #32
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    FireFleitz

    I wish you success in being able to save your station. Take your case to the public since you said they are not aware of the issue. Let the citizens know what they will be losing get them to sign petitions, write to the city council, the planning commission, whatever it takes.

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