1. #1
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    Default Staffing.....do the math (see bold text)

    Summer blazes plague Laramie fire fighters

    By Aaron LeClair
    Boomerang Staff Writer

    The Laramie Fire Department responded to an attic fire at 1652 N. Cedar on Tuesday, adding to an already busy day in which crews responded to several fires.

    The trailer is part of the Lee’s Mobile Home Park, which is located just off of Curtis Street.

    According to Lee’s resident Jennie Stevenson, she saw black smoke wafting from the trailer at about 2:30 p.m.

    “We just saw this thick, black smoke,” she said. “I told my husband to call the fire department.”

    But another neighbor was one step ahead of her as the LFD responded before Stevenson’s husband had called.

    LFD shift commander Dan Johnson said there was heavy smoke coming from the attic when crews arrived on scene.

    Johnson said that no one was home when the LFD first arrived.

    After entering the trailer, which was pouring smoke from its front door, chimney, vents and windows, LFD crews located the source of the blaze and swiftly put it out.

    “They went in and knocked it down pretty quick,” Johnson said. “In the first 10 minutes, they had it under control.”

    Curious neighbors gathered together to watch as fire crews fought the blaze inside the trailer.

    By 2:50 p.m., after the initial successful attack, Johnson said that fire crews were performing what the LFD calls “overhauling” — where they tear apart the structure (in this case, the ceiling) in an attempt to extinguish every inch of the fire.

    By about 5:30 p.m., the LFD crews had extinguished the fire completely, Johnson said.

    The fire damaged the attic and one of the trailer’s rooms below it, Johnson said. But because the investigation was not complete by press time, he could not comment on what caused the fire.

    The LFD had responded with two engines, a ladder truck, an ambulance, a command vehicle and a safety officer, for a total of 11 personnel at the scene, Johnson said.

    Crews from KN Energy and Pacific Power also responded, as well as the Laramie Police Department and Albany County Sheriff’s Office.

    In addition to Lee’s Mobile Home Park, the LFD responded to two other fires on Tuesday.

    According to Johnson, LFD crews were sent to battle a 10-acre fire about 20 miles south of Laramie, near Dale Creek, while others responded to one outside Fox Park.

    Johnson said that while the fire at Dale Creek was under control after two days of fighting, there would be LFD crews fighting it throughout Tuesday night.

    The smaller, 2-3 acre Fox Park fire — which started at about 5:30 p.m., Johnson said — was burning about five miles outside of Fox Park at press time.

    “They’ll be there throughout the night,” Johnson said of the LFD crews who responded to Fox Park.
    Buckle Up, Slow Down, Arrive Alive
    "Everybody Goes Home"

    IACOJ 2003

  2. #2
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    They do seem to be low on staffing. Our SOG's read as follows:

    "The goal of these response criteria is to initially put a minimum of 14 personnel, including Battalion Chiefs and Field Training Officers, on the scene of ALL fires. The First Alarm will consist of the three closest companies. The first due company shall respond “Priority 1” with all personnel on the Engine/Quint, the 2nd and 3rd due shall respond “Priority 3”, unless otherwise directed by the Communications Division. The 2nd due company shall respond with the Engine/Quint and Rescue. The 3rd due units shall respond with the equipment as directed by the Communications Division. "
    Last edited by Emberxx; 08-04-2005 at 09:56 PM.
    "When you throw dirt, you lose ground."

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    Only point is another example of FD's around the country that are handling events with less than adequate staffing...

    not to mention that the temps were in the 90's that day. And the response shown is all of their on-duty staffing.
    Last edited by mtnfireguy; 08-05-2005 at 12:50 AM.
    Buckle Up, Slow Down, Arrive Alive
    "Everybody Goes Home"

    IACOJ 2003

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    Thumbs down

    understaffed and overheated !
    IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
    Pardon me sir.. .....but I believe we are all over here !
    ATTENTION ALL SHOPPERS: Will the dead horse please report to the forums.(thanks Motown)
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    I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
    "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

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    Angry

    By subtracting one each for a command officer and safety officer and two for the ambulance, you're down to seven guys. I'm willing to put money on that being a pair of three-person engines and truck with driver-only. The sad thing is... Right now... My department would like to have that staffing level.

    On my last shift, we responded to a fire inside one of our large industries. We had three career guys on the engine and two volunteers on the first alarm. (Total = Five!)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Emberxx
    They do seem to be low on staffing. Our SOG's read as follows:

    "The goal of these response criteria is to initially put a minimum of 14 personnel, including Battalion Chiefs and Field Training Officers, on the scene of ALL fires. The First Alarm will consist of the three closest companies. The first due company shall respond “Priority 1” with all personnel on the Engine/Quint, the 2nd and 3rd due shall respond “Priority 3”, unless otherwise directed by the Communications Division. The 2nd due company shall respond with the Engine/Quint and Rescue. The 3rd due units shall respond with the equipment as directed by the Communications Division. "
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Just curious. So a reported fire gets the 1st engine emergency, but everyone coming to support the 1st engine responds routine? And the communications division is running your fire department?
    RK
    cell #901-494-9437

    Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

    "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by MemphisE34a
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Just curious. So a reported fire gets the 1st engine emergency, but everyone coming to support the 1st engine responds routine? And the communications division is running your fire department?
    Unless there is a known fire. If not, then once the first engine gets on scene and does a size up, if there is a need the other units are stepped up to priority one.

    As far as the "communications division thing goes" this isn't a decision made by comms, but by the on-scene Command. This is merely to ensure that command is maintained and that the response is dictated by conditions on scene.

    If command decides, as happens at times, that a second tanker is needed, that's the piece of equipment that would be called for, if he feels he needs another engine for whatever reason...ditto.

    Although I can see where the wording might get confusing!
    Last edited by Emberxx; 08-05-2005 at 12:56 AM.
    "When you throw dirt, you lose ground."

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    Uh wouldn't it be better to roll everyone (standard 1st Alarm) emergency? How do you deal with needing that water supply but it is responding non emergency?
    We struck down evil with the mighty sword of teamwork and the hammer of not bickering.

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    [QUOTE=Emberxx]Unless there is a known fire. If not, then once the first engine gets on scene and does a size up, if there is a need the other units are stepped up to priority one.

    Okay. Just curious again. If only one caller reports a house being on fire, does your department believe them? What makes a 'known' fire? I have been dispatched on several "sounds like we got one" calls to be BS and several "this is gonna a BS call" that turns out to be a barn burner!! How do you really differentiate?

    If someone here reports a fire, we believe them. If it turns out otherwise, responding units are cancelled.
    RK
    cell #901-494-9437

    Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

    "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

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    Same here Memphis. It's much easier to turn around the extra apparatus than to stand there wishing they were coming...

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    Wow - one firefighter, one engine.

    I prefer the 4 on engines and trucks that I experienced. That said it shows what many are up against.
    Jacktee

    IACOJ

    "Insert quotation here."

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    Okay guys, here's the entire text....just remember...I don't make the rules, I just follow em!


    These alarm assignments will be for all residential and commercial structures that are not investigative.

    First Alarm Second Alarm All other Alarms Special Call
    3 Engines/Quint 2 Engines Same as First
    Alarm
    Any equipment or personnel as requested by IC or BC
    1 Rescue Unit (Min.) 1 Rescue Unit (Min.)
    1 Tanker 1 Tanker
    1 Battalion Chief 1 Battalion Chief
    1 Ladder/Quint
    FTO Duty Dep. Chief
    PIO (Notify) PIO
    Investigator (Notify) Cascade/ Mechanic
    Investigator

    The goal of these response criteria is to initially put a minimum of 14 personnel, including Battalion Chiefs and Field Training Officers, on the scene of ALL fires. The First Alarm will consist of the three closest companies. The first due company shall respond “Priority 1” with all personnel on the Engine/Quint, the 2nd and 3rd due shall respond “Priority 3”, unless otherwise directed by the Communications Division. The 2nd due company shall respond with the Engine/Quint and Rescue. The 3rd due units shall respond with the equipment as directed by the Communications Division.

    A Quint will respond to all commercial and multi-residential structures.

    Investigative Initial Response:

    TYPE OF ALARM RESPONSE
    All Structures The Two Closest Companies*
    Unknown Odors, Arching/Down Power Lines or Transformers 1 Engine/Quint*
    Smoke Outside of Structures 1 Brush unit, depending on location

    *A minimum of 1 Quint must be part of the 1st Alarm assignment for all commercial and multi-residential responses.

    Purpose:

    To define the response of equipment dispatched to an investigative assignment, alarms initiated by alarm companies, directing the use of full protective equipment by all personnel, set standards of equipment to be carried by personnel, positioning of vehicles and notification of conditions found.

    Response:

    The following procedures shall be followed when responding to an investigative assignment:

    Only the first due unit is to use a Priority 1 Response all other responding units are to use a Priority 3 response, unless directed otherwise.


    The number and type of apparatus/equipment dispatched shall rest with Fire communications, dependent on information received by them and the Alarm Assignment SOG. Once information is received from an alarm company that a reported fire alarm is false, the response will be canceled with the exception of the first due unit which will continue without lights and siren to investigate.

    The response procedures for investigative alarms involving commercial, industrial, medical complexes, nursing facilities, educational facilities, prison complexes, shopping malls and any other complex of three or more stories are as follows:

    The first due engine will respond Priority One, with lights and sirens, all other units from the First Alarm assignment will respond Priority Three unless directed otherwise. This type of response requires all units to get into service in a normal emergency response manner.

    If additional incident information is obtained by the Communication Center, First Due Engine Company, Battalion Chief or any other means, then all units will be notified to step up to Priority One if warranted.

    Incidents in which building access is provided either through occupant or Knox box key shall be searched thoroughly for any signs of fire, smoke or high temperature.

    Second due Unit shall locate water supply and fire system connections, if applicable. If alarm is cancelled, or as other units arrive to stage, position apparatus as not to impede traffic anymore than necessary, consistent with safe operations.

    First due Engine Company shall make an attempt to access alarm panel, check status and origin of alarm and notify other responding units of their findings.

    If no sign of smoke, fire or unusually high temperatures is detected, alarm system malfunction is indicated. If the investigating fire personnel make a determination that a structure is all clear (free of any fire or smoke), the owner or occupant shall be made aware of the situation and advised to attempt resetting of the alarm system.

    Fire District personnel are not responsible for resetting of alarm systems and shall refrain from doing so. It is permissible for fire personnel to assist the owner or occupant in resetting these systems upon request.

    Incidents in which a Fire Company arrives and is unable to gain access to a structure through normal means, shall be checked as closely as possible from the exterior. If no smoke, fire or high heat conditions are detected from the exterior, personnel shall not force entry.

    One Engine Company shall standby at such incidents for a period of 20 minutes, measured from the time of alarm, to await arrival of a key holder. After 20 minutes has expired, the Incident Commander or on scene Officer shall instruct communications to contact the alarm company, (if identified), advising them of the results of the investigation and that the district is terminating its response.

    Calls for arcing or downed power lines will be assessed by the Communications Division Officer for potential fire or safety hazards. If no hazards are apparent other than the need for an electrical utilities response, then no response is warranted.

    Alarm Definitions:

    Alarm Assignment All units assigned to an alarm.

    Alarm Level Classification of the severity of an incident based on the amount of units assigned.

    Brush Unit Consists of either a Brush or a Foam Truck.

    First Alarm Full assignment for the initial alarm level on all incidents.

    First-Due Response Response to an incident location by the closest unit.

    Investigative Assignment Response to an electronic fire alarm in any structure.

    Level 1 Response All responding units use a “Priority 1” response.

    Level 2 Response First responding units use a “Priority 1” response, all others use a “Priority 3” response.

    Priority 1 Response A controlled response with Lights and Sirens.

    Priority 2 Response With lights and sirens until within close proximity of scene, then no lights or sirens, used only when an emergency button activation is confirmed as a true emergency.

    Priority 3 Response A controlled safe response without lights and sirens. This type of response requires all units to go in service in a normal emergency manner.

    Second Due Response Response to an incident location by other than the closest unit backing up a First Due unit.

    Special Call Request for a specific piece of equipment needed at the incident.

    Task Force Response A predetermined response based on existing environmental conditions, such as wind, weather, Drought Index, season for a large brush fire, consisting of:
    1 Battalion Chief
    1 Engine
    1 Plow Unit from DOF
    1 tanker
    2 Brush Units (Brush / Foam)


    Alarm Assignment Response:

    The responsibility of initial dispatch of the noted minimum assignments shall rest with Fire Communications. However, any unit may alter the response at any time, with clearance from the Communications Center (must have rational reason for deviation). In all cases, the closest available Fire/Rescue unit will be assigned, regardless of capabilities, and backed up with the nearest appropriately equipped or staffed unit.

    I. Fire-Related Assignments

    A. Investigative Assignments

    1. An Investigative Assignment (electronic fire alarm) shall consist of one Engine/Quint

     Single Family Residences (includes duplexes & triplexes)

     Arching or possible fire in transformers, power lines or poles.

     Any call for unknown odors.

     All obvious non-emergent situations

     Quint shall respond to all commercial and mullti-residential structures.

    2. Calls to investigate smoke outside a structure require responding one Brush unit.

    3. An Investigative Assignment (electronic fire alarm) shall consist of a 1st Alarm Assignment for commercial, special risk and multi unit residential complexes. (This is a Level Two Response)

    II. Specialized Fire-Related Assignments

    A. A brush fire assignment will consist of one brush/foam unit. The need for a Division of Forestry plow or additional apparatus will be evaluated on an as needed basis. Extreme environmental/weather conditions, Drought Index greater than 400, high wind conditions, and/or a known large brush fire exist may initiate a Task Force Response.

    B. A commercial transport or recreational vehicle fire assignment shall consist of 1 Engine, 1Tanker, 1 Rescue.

    C. A car fire assignment shall consist of one engine company and one rescue unit, Level 1 response.

    D. Shipboard initial assignments are as follows:
    Fires involving marine vessels will require a First Alarm assignment, the Coast Guard and/or Florida Marine Patrol if in their jurisdiction. The dispatch of HAZMAT and Cascade shall be a "Priority 3" response in those cases where the situation warrants.

    E. A spill or ignition involving a tanker or fuel farm will require a First Alarm Assignment with the addition of the HAZ-MAT and Cascade units, "Priority 3".

    F. The initial assignments for Train derailments or fire are as follows:
    Trains shall require a First Alarm assignment with the addition of a Rescue and Special Operations. Response to each side of the derailment should be considered by the Communications Division

    G. High-rise fires will require a First Alarm assignment with the closest Quint if not included in the initial assignment.

    H. Building and/or Bridge Collapses will require a First Alarm assignment with the addition of another Rescue and Special Operations. In the event of a bridge collapse, the response shall require one engine and one rescue unit on each side of the canal or river, as well as notification of the Department of Transportation, the Bridge, and the Coast Guard when appropriate.

    I. Fire involving large LP gas cylinders (greater than 100 lbs.) will require a first assignment with the addition of the Special Operations.

    J. HAZ-MAT/SPECIAL OPERATIONS RESPONSES:

    1. A Haz-Mat response requires Station 10 to respond with Hazardous Material Vehicle 10 and Engine 10. In addition, Station 14 will respond Special Ops Vehicle 14 and Quint 14.

    2. A Confined Space or Technical Rescue response requires Station 10 to respond Haz-Mat 10 and Rescue 10. In addition, Station 14 will respond Special Ops Vehicle 14 and Quint 14.

    K. The initial assignments for aircraft incidents are as follows:
    For on-site or near incidents, the Control Tower will make the determination as to the Alert Status to be issued.

    1. Alert I - requires 1 Engine and 1 Rescue Priority 3 if the situation warrants.
    2. Alert II requires a First Alarm Response Level 2.
    3. Alert III – First Alarm Response plus additional Rescue units based on the amount of persons on the aircraft.
    4. Alert IV - will require a First Alarm response plus Special Operations.

    All Alert response units are to stage at Point “B” until Incident Command is established, at which time the Incident Commander will direct staging.


    Equipment:


    1. All units shall prepare themselves as though an actual fire was confirmed.
    2. All personnel entering the premises shall don full protective equipment.

    3. Standard equipment shall be carried by personnel depending upon occupancy, i.e., high-rise pack, forcible entry tools, shipboard pack, etc. These items are addressed under each appropriate SOG.
    General:

    Communications Division shall be advised as soon as possible as to additional staff and equipment needs, and/or the conditions found on arrival.
    "When you throw dirt, you lose ground."

    IACOJ

  13. #13
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    And I though that our department was screwed up!

    House fire gets 3 engines, 1 truck 1 Battalion Chief

    Second alarm's and so on, that incident get 2 engines, 1 truck and 1 Battalion Chief



    Emberxx, who keeps all this straight? I would have to have a score card or cheat notes for all of your guy’s assignments.
    Last edited by CaptOldTimer; 08-05-2005 at 06:38 PM.
    Stay Safe and Well Out There....

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