1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by FTMPTB15
    dang.. all these explorers carrying all this equipment like they're actually going to do something besides change my air bottle or hand me a cup of water.

    Extrication gloves???!! What in the world do ya'll need those for? It's not like you'll be cutting the cars.

    Medical Equip??! Again, I would hope it would solely be for yourself.. and not for administering first aid to someone else. In that case.. why don't you just get that off the truck??

    Rope and carabiners? Lord knows you're not going into any structure where you might actually have to bail out or need a search line..

    I really don't understand why ya'll walk around with all this gear.. don't even try and tell me that you use all of it.. because I carry about half of what most people here do and I do the job perfectly fine... and what I don't have on me I have near me in the truck. 90% of the gear listed about is unnecessary for explorers to carry... nomex hoods? wtf are they going to do with that?

    I do use everything in my gear. Carabiners and webbing can be used for more than searches and bailing out, you can use it to control a door, lift or attach a hose, and in my explorer post we do alot of drills that involve interior searches etc and i find it useful when dragging a "victim" out. Safety glasses come in handy when doing extriaction drills, waterball, or anything of the sort. I have used the patient assessment sheets various times in drills and once for a real incident. We do rehab opn fire scenes too. We actually put out car fires in drills so we need nomex's and fire gloves for that. Extrication gloves aren't only good for extricaton, they are good for connecting couplings, etc, when you don't want to wear bulky fire gloves. I have a stehoscope and BP cuff in my turnout bag and use that quite frequently as well. Things are done differntly everywhere.
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  2. #27
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    I carry a dead horse in my gear so I can throw it ot the Juniors and let them beat the living **** out of it.
    MFD Truck 2
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  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by RFRDxplorer
    I do use everything in my gear. Carabiners and webbing can be used for more than searches and bailing out, you can use it to control a door, lift or attach a hose, and in my explorer post we do alot of drills that involve interior searches etc and i find it useful when dragging a "victim" out. Safety glasses come in handy when doing extriaction drills, waterball, or anything of the sort. I have used the patient assessment sheets various times in drills and once for a real incident. We do rehab opn fire scenes too. We actually put out car fires in drills so we need nomex's and fire gloves for that. Extrication gloves aren't only good for extricaton, they are good for connecting couplings, etc, when you don't want to wear bulky fire gloves. I have a stehoscope and BP cuff in my turnout bag and use that quite frequently as well. Things are done differntly everywhere.
    That's all well and good, but now look back at what you said and count the number of items you said are used in DRILLS. Do you really think it is necessary to carry around all that stuff if you only really use it in a drill?
    Quote Originally Posted by RFRDxplorer
    when you don't want to wear bulky fire gloves.
    I suggest getting used to working with "bulky" fire gloves.. because when you become a firefighter, you won't have the option of using non-"bulky" gloves! Must be nice to pick and choose what you wear..
    Do it because you love it, not because you love being seen doing it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FTMPTB15
    I would just hate to be in a building an trying to get something out that I actually NEED and reach in a pull out a stethescope.. or have that think tangled up in the tool I need.. cause we all know that a stethescope is like cudzoo in an EMS bag!
    My gloves and the stethscope are both on inside pockets of the gear. And since it doesn't get close enough to the heat, not too worried about it. Once I get my EMS jacket, it'll be staying in that, instead of my fire jacket.


    I'd say a winter hat would do a better job in the winter than a hood.. atleast I've always found them to be warmer and thicker than a hood.. but that's just me.
    I've tried wearing a winter hat with my helmet, it just doesn't work. Go to a car accident, and they want full PPE on. Gotta have the helmet, can't have the winter cap. With the windchill factor, and with how cold our winters have been for the passed couple years, I like the protection from the wind as it also covers the exposed neck area, and most of the face. It's not uncommon during the winter to see me have my hood pulled up right around my eyes, with a pair of goggles on to keep my eyes from freezing.
    Quote Originally Posted by ThNozzleMan
    Why? Because we are firemen. We are decent human beings. We would be compelled by the overwhelming impulse to save an innocent child from a tragic, painful death because in the end, we are MEN.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mglax13
    I carry a dead horse in my gear so I can throw it ot the Juniors and let them beat the living **** out of it.
    haha zing

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by FTMPTB15
    Do you really think it is necessary to carry around all that stuff if you only really use it in a drill?

    I suggest getting used to working with "bulky" fire gloves.. because when you become a firefighter, you won't have the option of using non-"bulky" gloves! Must be nice to pick and choose what you wear..

    It sure is nice when alot of the drills we do involve gearing up and responding to a simulated call and I don't have to run back to my gear bag to grab something before we go. Why would I have to wear fire gloves in alot of those situations anyway? Aren't they designed for firefighting? IMHO, I think that you should wear the gloves that are made for the situation you need them for. So are you saying that if I go to a medical call when I am a probie I should wear fire gloves over the latexes or nitriles so I can get used to them? I don't mean to be a smart *****, but I don't think I understand where you are coming from. I wear my fire gloves for searches, car fire drills, etc. where they are needed but if I am putting up or taking down a waterball cable or hooking up couplings I don't feel that I need them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by RFRDxplorer
    So are you saying that if I go to a medical call when I am a probie I should wear fire gloves over the latexes or nitriles so I can get used to them?
    EXACTLY... and I do mean to be a smart-***! Use common sense. Do you think that I'm going to switch to rescue gloves to connect couplings, etc. while on the fireground?! NO! You're getting used to using those gloves because it is "easier" when in the future, you won't be able to.

    And to answer your question... it depends what type of medical call you're going on! An MVA is considered a medical call... unless there is an entrapment or pin-in. Typically I'll wear latex gloves under my fire gloves.. it is a good practice to do. What if you needed to say... pry open a door, or remove some glass, or cut a battery cable, or you put down some quick-dry... and now you have to help with a patient. Are you going to run back to the truck or reach in your pocket and put on gloves? I'd hope not.. especially if you were needed IMMEDIATELY. In this case all you would do is take off your fire gloves and VIOLA! You're now ready to assist the patient. I'm not hear to argue with you... but just know.. one day you'll realize that all of that "stuff" was not necessary. You'll be wishing you didn't have to carry around additional stuff... especially when it comes time to climb up several flights of stairs, or crawl through narrow spaces. That is why I hate having extra gear on me.. carabiners, wrenches, rope in your side doesn't feel too good!
    Do it because you love it, not because you love being seen doing it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FTMPTB15
    And to answer your question... it depends what type of medical call you're going on! An MVA is considered a medical call... unless there is an entrapment or pin-in. Typically I'll wear latex gloves under my fire gloves.. it is a good practice to do. What if you needed to say... pry open a door, or remove some glass, or cut a battery cable, or you put down some quick-dry... and now you have to help with a patient.
    Unless your SUPER understaffed the two on the ambulance and maybe one or two for your crew should be able to take care of just about any patient. If I have to disconnect a battery, remove glass, or put down quick-dry..I can do all of that, and more alone. It shouldn't take four people to take care of a battery, remove glass or throw down oil dry. In fact in an earlier call this week, I did all of the above on semi, including cleaning up about 25 gallons of gear lube.
    Are you going to run back to the truck or reach in your pocket and put on gloves? I'd hope not.. especially if you were needed IMMEDIATELY. In this case all you would do is take off your fire gloves and VIOLA! You're now ready to assist the patient.
    I would not be going back to the truck, but it only takes a few seconds to put on EMS gloves, I always put on a pair underneath my extrication gloves while en-route to an MVA anyhow, but it only takes a second or two.
    I'm not hear to argue with you... but just know.. one day you'll realize that all of that "stuff" was not necessary. You'll be wishing you didn't have to carry around additional stuff
    To each his own, I carry a bunch of stuff with me too, and have yet to get into a pinch, or found myself saying..man I'f only I had this or that. A bunch of guys call me a toolbox, Rescue 92, or the walking swiss army knife, but when they need somthing, 99% of the time they know who to ask. I don't run relay races, so It's better to be prepaerd vs. trying to run the 400m Baton in bunker gear
    ... especially when it comes time to climb up several flights of stairs, or crawl through narrow spaces. That is why I hate having extra gear on me.. carabiners, wrenches, rope in your side doesn't feel too good!
    It's all a matter of your gear fitting right, organizing everything correctly, and knowing how to move. None of my stuff is a hinderance, or an issue in the heat of battle. No pun intended. Everyone does everything different, but you'd be surprised how nice it can be to have a tool when you need it vs. having to find it, or running to get it. Work smarter not harder..
    FF/NREMT-B

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    Quote Originally Posted by pfd4life
    Unless your SUPER understaffed the two on the ambulance and maybe one or two for your crew should be able to take care of just about any patient. If I have to disconnect a battery, remove glass, or put down quick-dry..I can do all of that, and more alone. It shouldn't take four people to take care of a battery, remove glass or throw down oil dry. In fact in an earlier call this week, I did all of the above on semi, including cleaning up about 25 gallons of gear lube.
    I'm sorry you misunderstood me... obviously one person can do all of the things listed above, BUT who's to say that there are more patients than your crew first anticipates.
    For example.. pull up to a scene, with two cars. Appears to be 2 patients in 1 car and 1 maybe 2 in the second car. You're told to secure the vehicles and control the fluids on the roadway. There are 4 guys on your truck. 2 guys go to the car with 2 patients, one goes to check out the other car, and you put some oil-dry down to contain the fluids. All well and good until the guy that went to the car with 1 possibly 2 patients... now has 2 patients. I don't know about ya'll... but I wouldn't want to take time to take off fire gloves, secure them, get out latex gloves, and try and put them on my hands after having those fire gloves on. (cause we all know how well fire gloves 'breathe!')

    Just a thought though... do it as you please! Just keep in mind that every MVA isn't only going to have 1 or 2 patients.. and EMS isn't always going to be there when/before we arrive! Its always best to be prepared.. rather than being caught with you pants down. (now that is within reason.. without walking around like a Craftsman tool supplier... cause then we just nickname you Tool... or Benford... or Craftsman... or Toro..)
    Do it because you love it, not because you love being seen doing it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FTMPTB15
    I'm sorry you misunderstood me... obviously one person can do all of the things listed above, BUT who's to say that there are more patients than your crew first anticipates.
    For example.. pull up to a scene, with two cars. Appears to be 2 patients in 1 car and 1 maybe 2 in the second car. You're told to secure the vehicles and control the fluids on the roadway. There are 4 guys on your truck. 2 guys go to the car with 2 patients, one goes to check out the other car, and you put some oil-dry down to contain the fluids. All well and good until the guy that went to the car with 1 possibly 2 patients... now has 2 patients. I don't know about ya'll... but I wouldn't want to take time to take off fire gloves, secure them, get out latex gloves, and try and put them on my hands after having those fire gloves on. (cause we all know how well fire gloves 'breathe!')

    Just a thought though... do it as you please! Just keep in mind that every MVA isn't only going to have 1 or 2 patients.. and EMS isn't always going to be there when/before we arrive! Its always best to be prepared.. rather than being caught with you pants down. (now that is within reason.. without walking around like a Craftsman tool supplier... cause then we just nickname you Tool... or Benford... or Craftsman... or Toro..)
    We don't need to commit a resource, meaning a FF for each patient. We need to do triage at a multiple injury accident. And if you feel you need more assistance, call for it prior to arrival. You can always turn them back once you make an assessment of the scene. In my area though, it's a cold day in hell when we beat EMS on scene, we are not co-dispatched, and as far as I'm concerned it's a bunch of bunk. Every area does it differently.
    FF/NREMT-B

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    Quote Originally Posted by pfd4life
    We don't need to commit a resource, meaning a FF for each patient. We need to do triage at a multiple injury accident. And if you feel you need more assistance, call for it prior to arrival. You can always turn them back once you make an assessment of the scene. In my area though, it's a cold day in hell when we beat EMS on scene, we are not co-dispatched, and as far as I'm concerned it's a bunch of bunk. Every area does it differently.
    I agree... we are typically co-dispatched and depending on where they are can generally beat them to the scene. I agree... triage is necessary, if there appears to be multiple patients call for additional, but during that time while EMS and additional units are enroute more than likely everyone will be doing something... C-Spine, applying dressings to control bleeding, splinting... but more than likely it will be C-Spine and I'm yet to see someone who can hold C-Spine on two different patients at the same time... therefore, you would need to commit a resource to each patient, atleast until they are secured onto a backboard w/ blocks.

    But yea.. I see where you are coming from and agree... but we don't always know whether or not we'll need additional resources prior to arrival, and in those cases (which for us is most cases..) you might find yourself having to handle the scene (such as previously listed) prior to engaging in patient care. That was the point... to prove that yes, you might need to wear latex gloves under your fire gloves at an EMS call!
    Do it because you love it, not because you love being seen doing it.

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    I'm not saying that I change them for every task and I realize that an MVA might be considered a medical and I can understand wearing fire gloves over latexes in that situation. IMHO, it is good to have the right piece of equipment or gear for the situation at hand. I realize how changing gloves on a fire scene might nto make any since, but you were the one that brought up the fact that I am an explorer and do not do much.

    I definatly agree that I would rather have the tools on hand then walk back to the truck to get them. I will carry these and more probably as I gain experience and become a full firefighter. What is you get entrapped in a drop ceiling that has collapsed, wire cutters or linesmans pliers might not get you out, but its worth a shot.
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    Quote Originally Posted by RFRDxplorer
    I

    What is you get entrapped in a drop ceiling that has collapsed, wire cutters or linesmans pliers might not get you out, but its worth a shot.

    Its good that your thinking.....but ask yourself this....why did the drop ceiling collapse? Fire, heat, structually failure, nozzle movement etc etc etc? And if any of those are the reason for getting tangled....then you have bigger problems to face. You are not reall going to have the time to snip and clip your way out....for the most part you'll be able to just push that junk off of yourself.

    Your best tool at this point is your Head....and most importanly...the attaching component, your EARS. Seek out, ask, and listen to a senior man...not some dope with time...but someone who has time and experiance. Those guys have TONS on info that I am sure they are dying to share....

    With that said....this is what I carry....

    Sharpe Knife (outside of Bunker Coat)
    1.5" OST (outter stream tip, for smoothbores, washdown and limited water emergencies)
    spanner
    hose strap
    35' 3/8" utility rope
    15' 1" tubular webbing, rolled up and in an ems glove
    med size robo grips
    dykes
    combo screw driver
    2 chocks
    carabiner
    Schrad multi tool....(carried on my belt that holds up me shorts )
    flashlight (outside of coat)

    My Helemt:
    2 chocks
    Curcifex Blessed by the Pope himself

    I also carry a hand light when I have the Door or control position...on the strap I have 2 chocks that I use first.

    Stay Safe guys.....and keep your ears open....

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by FTMPTB15
    And to answer your question... it depends what type of medical call you're going on! An MVA is considered a medical call... unless there is an entrapment or pin-in. Typically I'll wear latex gloves under my fire gloves.. it is a good practice to do. What if you needed to say... pry open a door, or remove some glass, or cut a battery cable, or you put down some quick-dry... and now you have to help with a patient. Are you going to run back to the truck or reach in your pocket and put on gloves? I'd hope not.. especially if you were needed IMMEDIATELY. In this case all you would do is take off your fire gloves and VIOLA! You're now ready to assist the patient. I'm not hear to argue with you... but just know.. one day you'll realize that all of that "stuff" was not necessary. You'll be wishing you didn't have to carry around additional stuff... especially when it comes time to climb up several flights of stairs, or crawl through narrow spaces. That is why I hate having extra gear on me.. carabiners, wrenches, rope in your side doesn't feel too good!
    allow me to jump in on this. if you are going to an MVA, why are you even wearing firefighter gloves? if you go to a water rescue, do you wear full turnout gear? use what is appropriate for the call. on a MVA/entrapment, I ditch my FF glove, and wear either extrication gloves or leather work gloves. much better dexterity, easier to grab tooles, easier to do patient care. use the proper tool for the job.

    in my jacket pockets, I carry lether work gloves, extication gloves, a multi tool and i think some webbing. I also have latex gloves (I think, I should probably go through what I have) in those pockets. and I know when I put my SCBA waist strap on, those pockets become inaccessable, which is ok, because they aren't going to be used in a fire situation. my inside pocket has a spare pair of safety glasses too.

    on my pants pocket, I carry a bailout bag (carribeeners and 50 ft of rope), and other the other side, FF gloves, wire cutters, and a wedge or two.

    on my helmet, I carry trauma sheers, a flashlight (which always seems to be dead when i need it), two small wedges, and one big one.

    as vinnie said, see what the senior guys in your department carry in their gear. the longer you do this, the more stuff you will put in your gear (because you needed it) and the more stuff you will take out of your gear (because you realize that you might have needed it then, but have never and probably will never need it again).

    one last thing. you guys are juniors. what you need and what an interior guy needs are two different things. just like a truckie needs different stuff than an engine guy, you guys need to take things one step at a time. as a junior, you probably don't need that much extra crap in your gear. yeah, it's nice to have during drills, but you can probably get away with just the basics.

    good luck with your careers, and see you at the big one
    If my basic HazMat training has taught me nothing else, it's that if you see a glowing green monkey running away from something, follow that monkey!

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    Just got back from Jefferson County Fire School here in Kentucky and most of my classes(I took two half day classes and one full day class)were populated with Explorers.
    The thing is,once they get the training checked off,at least here in Kentucky,it counts should they go active volunteer firefighter when they turn 18.
    The thing I did,after I performed the forcible entry exercises,was to help the Explorers see what the instructors told us,and go through the training.
    If being a firefighter means helping others,why wouldn't it apply to keeping Explorers trained up as much as possible?Some day,that Explorer kid might be your backup on an attack line or helping you to ladder a house and open up the roof.
    It may be a little"whackerish" for an Explorer to have the same tools that I carry on me but it does get them used to the weight and how to use them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RFRDxplorer
    I do use everything in my gear. Carabiners and webbing can be used for more than searches and bailing out, you can use it to control a door, lift or attach a hose, and in my explorer post we do alot of drills that involve interior searches etc and i find it useful when dragging a "victim" out. Safety glasses come in handy when doing extriaction drills, waterball, or anything of the sort. I have used the patient assessment sheets various times in drills and once for a real incident. We do rehab opn fire scenes too. We actually put out car fires in drills so we need nomex's and fire gloves for that. Extrication gloves aren't only good for extricaton, they are good for connecting couplings, etc, when you don't want to wear bulky fire gloves. I have a stehoscope and BP cuff in my turnout bag and use that quite frequently as well. Things are done differntly everywhere.
    Whats waterball????

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    In a nutshell water ball is, a pony keg or yellow ball suspended from a cable x feet above the ground and you try to keep it on the other team's side or push it to their a-frame using a 1 1/2" hose with smoothbore nozzle on both teams for a front nozzle and the same for each team as a backup.
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  18. #43
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    one thing i've always heard is "you can tell how long they have been on the job by how much stuff they carry"......definately speaks for itself

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    I carry the same stuff now as I did when I was an explorer:

    -hood
    -fire gloves
    -1 pair latex gloves
    -hunk of webbing
    -carabiner
    -knife
    -2 wedges
    -rescue gloves
    -safety glasses

    That be it!


    Lammrover
    "Plan for the worst, hope for the best"

    FF/EMT: Nimishillen Township FD
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    Student: Stark State C.O.T.

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    yah, but it doesnt seem like you carry anything that any one else wouldn't have on them

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    Quote Originally Posted by doughesson
    Firefighting gloves,extrication gloves,2 res-q wrenches,truckie belt/hose strap,window punch,pen,Pelican Little Ed light,Motorola radio,2 door wedges,and a seatbelt cutter.

    i just ordered a res-q wrench...you y'all like them? anygood? durable? thanks! sorry if i changed the topic...i am just curious
    Last edited by mikie333; 01-20-2006 at 11:45 AM.

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    Shoot - After looking at all of that junk you guys carry here is what I carry.

    Turout Gear
    Helmet
    Safety Glasses
    Ear Plugs
    Duty Gloves (All purpose)
    Nomex Gloves (FF Gloves)
    Flash Hood
    - When I get my gear on, pager goes into pager pocket and cellphone stays in my jeans pocket.

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    We drill to learn what to expect and what to do in real life situations don't we?

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    Extra nomex hood under my helmet suspension
    Combination screw driver
    Sprinkler wedges
    Leather Gloves
    Extra Structure Gloves
    12' loop of webbing
    2 phoenix straps
    folding knife
    wedge
    extra medical gloves
    minimaglight as a back up

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    [QUOTE=Res343cue;582800] Stethescope because I prefer not to share mine with other people. Who knows what kinda funky ear wax people have :P

    You want to fight fire and you are worried about earwax?

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