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  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber Emberxx's Avatar
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    Default Pump Operator Training

    I'm wondering how many departments have some sort of ongoing training for their guys who might have to step-up to engineer. Do your departments offer any sort of hydraulic training or classes?

    I don't mean EVOC. I'm not talking about the actual driving (not saying that it's not important, it's a huge part of being a pump operator) but want to concentrate on the ff's ability to operate the trucks.
    "When you throw dirt, you lose ground."

    IACOJ


  2. #2
    Forum Member dchomen's Avatar
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    Default ADO/Emgineer Training

    Emberxx, our department puts on an engineers class that includes , driving, evo, hydralics, pump maintenance, apparatus trip inspections, and finnally cdl certification.
    In our department ( www.saltlakefiredistrict.org ) UFA, requires that training prior to promotion to engineer. This is a specialty promoted position with concurrent pay so it is a civil service promotable position in our department. This mandates a written test and practical preformance test.

    Hope this helps. Stay safe and keep low, we all come home. jack

    BTW All Ff in our department must be ado to remain on the job. jack

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber Emberxx's Avatar
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    dchomen,

    I see that it's required prior to promotion. What about the guys that have to step up to that position?
    "When you throw dirt, you lose ground."

    IACOJ

  4. #4
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    Default

    My department doesnt have formal training. We are a combination department but.......our insurance that covers us recently required us to have a Missouri Class "E" chauffer license and our chief and board mandated a couple of years ago that anyone wishing to drive the engines had to have at least basic pump operations class. I took the class through a regional fire school. I am going for my fire science degree and this coming semester I will be taking a Hydraulics class.

    Prior to these mandates by our insurance and board, you could drive with a regualr license and as long as someone who knew how to pump showed you the basics, you were good to go. But, we had some guys screw some stuff up pretty bad on some calls and then they decided to change things. Which in my opinion was a wise move. Hope this helps.
    Firefighter/EMT-B
    IACOJ

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber UTFFEMT's Avatar
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    Default

    We require State and City Certification ADO-Apparatus Driver Operator training for those guys/Gals that want to be move up Engineers. We put on an in house class usually at least once a year for this.

    In addition we have every six months all ADO's and Enginners must take a Written, Practical and Driving test to maintain this certification.

    The same if True for Truck-Ariel Appartaus certification.
    Front line since 1983 and still going strong

  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber Emberxx's Avatar
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    Wow...that's pretty impressive.
    "When you throw dirt, you lose ground."

    IACOJ

  7. #7
    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
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    Default

    To become a driver you must attend and pass a Pump Operators class and CEVO at one of the local academies. You then spend time with the engineer's and get final approval from the Captain. Each year, all drivers have to "re-certify" by demonstrating the necessary skills.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  8. #8
    Forum Member SCOOBY14B's Avatar
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    Default

    Our department probably has one of the most comprehensive driver training programs in the country. The coordinator has been contacted from departments from around the country have contacted him for information. The program has also been featured in several publications (FireChief, etc).

    Once a firefighter has been employeed for a period of 2 years and met all of the requirements then he/she is eligible for "Relief Driver". This course is a four week, 5 days a week class. During this class the firefighters are taken off shift and are assigned to our Fire Academy.

    The first week is committed to classroom work focusing on driving laws, conditions, fire apparatus, pump theory and operation and hydraulics. During this time each apparatus used is gone over from front to back, top to bottom. The class is limited to 6-10 participants to allow excellent instructor to student ratio and alot of driving and pumping time.

    During the second week, student rotate from pumping the different apparatus with at least one instructor coaching/ monitoring and driving the apparatus. The pumping scenarios range from simple 2-3 handlines to pumping the maximum amount of water allowed. The student must drive to the hydrant, spot, catch his/her own water and pump as if the situation is real. All handlines, etc are actual in length and nozzles.

    The third week is the same with the exception of one day dedicated to each student doing over the road driving on each different apparatus (usually 20-30 miles on each) under the supervision of a veteran Engineer. The last 2 days are reserved for final testing.

    The fourth week, each student is rotated to our busiest companies driving for a period of 8 hours each day. After the end of the 4th week the students are returned to their assigned companies and further monitored by their officer and engineer.

    Generally these students are withheld from being certified on aerial apparatus for a period of one year. Once they leave the Relief Driver program, they are certified on each engine we have. If they are to drive an aerial after the one year, they must be certified by a Battalion Apparatus Trainer on that apparatus. This involves a cone course, over the road driving, pump practical and written test.

    We also do pump training generally each monthly.

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