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  1. #1
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    Thumbs down carbon fiber hoods

    Just a warning to those that have the black carbon fiber hoods. they are terrible had a friend that was first in on a three story rowhome with heavy fire 2nd floor and sustained 2nd and 3rd degree burns on ears and neck with this hood on. also plenty of other firefighters with this hood got serious burns on different occasions. Just a warning they are not as good as we thought they were.
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  2. #2
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    But hey, they're a lot lighter and make your car look SOOOO much cooler than the factory hoods!

    Just kidding, thanks for the tip!

  3. #3
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    I have had one for about a year now and have had no problems with it. The only down side I have noticed is that the hood does not breathe very well...which could explain the problem with the burns due to trapped moisture.

  4. #4
    Forum Member Tillerman17's Avatar
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    Were they thermal burns or steam related? I have a carbon hood and have been in some intense heat without any problems. Anyone else having trouble?
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  5. #5
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    Sounds like we need some more info on this. I know that there are several manufacturers that make hoods of carbon-based cloth. T10WSFF - do you know the manufacturer of the hood in question? I'm using one of the carbon hoods so I'm keen to find out more.
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  6. #6
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    There are plenty of guys on my department with the carbon hoods. To the best of my knowledge noone has had any major problems other than the non-breathing issue. Ive thought about getting one but dont want to part with my nomex one as I have had it a while and it still keeps me protected. Hoods, like any other piece of equipment will have its goods and bads. And every manufacturer will have some good and some bad of the same item. It just depends on how it was made and if the workers were actually doing quality work or if they made it on a friday.

    But yes, more info would be appreciated.
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  7. #7
    Forum Member HeavyRescueTech's Avatar
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    ok, I'll claim ignorance in this area.

    is a thicker hood better, or a thinner hood?

    I've heard both arguements, that a thicker hood will protect you better, however you won't feel the heat and might end up going into hotter areas and further into a structure than you should be.

    now, where does a Carbon hood fit into this?

    I've only used nomex, but I have used both the sock hoods and the thinner ones, and don't know how they can both do the same thing if they are different thicknesses
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    Hey folks! I have been steam burned wearing one of these and it was due to the moisture trapped between the hood and my neck. I am really interested in the down low on this one due to the fact I am hopefully getting ready to purchase a bunch of them from a grant. If you can get the specifics on this please forward them to me. I need to know if they were thermal burns or steam burns. Also the most important question we should be asking is...

    Are you friends okay and going to recover fully?

    Also keep in mind with these hoods, when you really start to feel the heat thru them, it's too late! You are getting ready to be burned.

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by t10wsff
    Just a warning to those that have the black carbon fiber hoods. they are terrible had a friend that was first in on a three story rowhome with heavy fire 2nd floor and sustained 2nd and 3rd degree burns on ears and neck with this hood on. also plenty of other firefighters with this hood got serious burns on different occasions. Just a warning they are not as good as we thought they were.

    Well, bad hood or not, if they suffered 2nd and 3rd degree burns under it then they were probably too damn far in to begin with. I'm not trying to knock your firefighters, but anyone who gets 3rd degree burns under there PPE should probably have backed out earlier. Of course there are the exceptions. Just my 2 cents.

  10. #10
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    Been doing some more thinking about this. Earlier this year I was in a fire where things went bad, and it became hot enough that it totally melted face shields and stuffed the helmet completely, but the only burns I received were compression burns on the knees and shoulders, but I received no burns on the area covered by my carbon hood (mine is made by PGI).

    Obviously from T10's post something happened in the fire he mentioned though.
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  11. #11
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    Thumbs down Just wear 2 hoods

    OK...here is one to think about. Vendors in our area are now telling us that the carbon fiber hood is only for flash protection. Now you ask yourself what the &*%$ are they saying. In their own words you still need to wear a nomex hood as well as the carbon fiber hood. Well, that is an improvment, lets start wearing 2 hoods and we can get even further into a structure. Who knows what is next???
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  12. #12
    Forum Member Co11FireGal's Avatar
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    Have one that I have worn on a few fires with no problems, but I still feel safer with my thicker nomex...and it's a whole lot warmer in the winter than the thinner carbon material.

    I will be interested in reading further on this though, since carbon is what all of our incoming firefighters are being issued now.
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  13. #13
    MembersZone Subscriber npfd801's Avatar
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    We run carbon hoods, and have had a few sore ears in our "myths and realities" scenarios, where the intent it to get it uncomfortably hot, introduce a little steam from a fog, and maybe get to a point that the recruits can get a taste of what it feels like to be getting too warm. I firmly believe a part of this is due to the fact everyone was already good and sweaty before the scenario. We also warned everyone to wear long sleeve tees, as steam burns were a real liklihood on their arms with only a short sleeve tee on. Teaches the probies that when we tell them to do something, we mean it - as there's always one or two that come out with a little bit of a "sunburn" on their arms.

    Anyhow, like everything else, I think you need to look at the actual material being used in the hood. The hand of the fabric lends itself a lot to how it holds moisture against the head, etc. We had one batch that everyone hated, and you can tell who the aggressive folks are because they're the ones that have had some issues. The latest batch of carbon hoods we've bought are a much softer, looser knit and are doing a better job in my opinion.

    Check out these guys' site for some TPP and other info on hoods. Just like wearing hoods at all, some folks will say a lower TPP will let you know when the s is hitting the fan. I'm not here to debate that, but I don't think claiming all carbon based hoods to be faulty is necessary. I will also say I hated the first batch we bought, and for the record - they were not a Majestic product. The hoods we like are, however...

    Majestic Fire Apparel Hood Material Info

    One thing that I think helps with our latest hoods is that the material is woven to look very much like long underwear does, with the little "squares" in the knit. Hard to explain, but I think it helps, if only to make the fabric more comfortable against the skin.

  14. #14
    Forum Member Dave1983's Avatar
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    Hmmm, Im looking to replace my P84 hood. Perhaps I'll hold off on the carbon.
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  15. #15
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    Dave,I wouldn't "hold off"just because of the material.Just like everything else we use,some stuff can be better than others.Do your research.As I've been "preaching" for awhile here now,read thru the responses."Steam burns"with new recruits(training?),"Fire went bad":Why?Unforseen circumstances,unusual fire load,bad vent,no escape route,someone put a fan where it didn't belong? To me these are ALL "Red Flag Warnings",people(FFs)have been put into a "bad"situation.As Safety/ops Chief,I want to KNOW WHY. Bad policy on our part? Bad tactics? Crew didn't "read"conditions right? IC didn't "read" fire right? Any job can go "bad",but the more you know and the better you train your people,the higher the probability that they make it out in one piece.Every job must be "logged" and studied if you hope to keep personnel as safe as possible and still do the job.We use P84's too,with good success.But some of these posts would warrant further investigation in this outfit. My opinions of hoods are well known,but in todays world are an essential part of all ops.One needs to be vigilant however,in how far past the point of no return we push. And we all operate under different conditions of "risk management".What might be acceptable or required in your district,might NOT be in mine. T.C.

  16. #16
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    Our department bought a bunch of hese carbon hoods. With some of our guys their melons are to big to fit the hood and make the seal over the facepeice leaving exposed skin. I have that problem and went back to my PBI one. They are good, but when the only point they can try and sell on is the fact that you can get them to 2500* before they melt..yeah. That's great. One of those things that sounds good on paper, but in reality, not very good. So for those of you who have them, and have not incurred any injuries to them yet, your lucky. For those of you who have, I have pity for falling into the trap of a marketing professional. The one I recieved never got close to a fire, I was issued it, and within five minutes, it was given right back. I urge you to really look at these, and make sure its somthing YOU WANT to be wearing. Not somthing a magazine ad thinks you SHOULD be wearing.
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  17. #17
    MembersZone Subscriber npfd801's Avatar
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    Again, there is more than one brand of hood, sewn and constructed in different fashions, very likely using fabrics from different mills. Our first batch was also too small in my opinion, especially for the bigger guys.

    Saying that everyone should stay away from carbon hoods is the same as saying everyone should stay away from using SCBAs, just because one particular brand had a failure.

    Educate yourselves, trial some of what you think you might like, and form your own opinions.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by npfd801
    Again, there is more than one brand of hood, sewn and constructed in different fashions, very likely using fabrics from different mills. Our first batch was also too small in my opinion, especially for the bigger guys.
    While correct it's been my experience that most are smaller than what most departments have for hoods. most of the fabrics I have seen are all CarbonX as they have the patent on that fabric, so most are all woven the same.

    Saying that everyone should stay away from carbon hoods is the same as saying everyone should stay away from using SCBAs, just because one particular brand had a failure.
    Oh come on..an SCBA is an SCBA right? Now I'm going to disagree with this on the simple fact that, in the small amount of time that the carbon hoods have been on the market, a fair amount of FF's complain that they don't fit well, and are causing burns and injuries. And no I'm not basing this off this thread alone.
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  19. #19
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    I heard once at a rookie class something about carbon fiber hoods and that aren't as good but I didn't pay much attention. Anyone here have any experience with Reed hoods?

  20. #20
    MembersZone Subscriber npfd801's Avatar
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    I still say if you look at a cross section of people using the hoods, and you prove to me it is every mill's carbon weave, and every manufacturer's style of assembly, sewing or shape and gut of the hood giving burns to people, then you can across the board label carbon based hoods as failures.

    In regards to Reed hoods, you'll have a dozen guys say they're too heavy/thick/restrict your senses, etc. and some guy from Texas will chime in and tell you that they're the greatest thing ever. Again, try one. If your department is serious about switching to them, talk to your local rep that sells them, and get samples to try.

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