1. #1
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    Default FDNY Releasing Sept. 11 Papers, Recordings???

    "The department on Friday plans to make public hours of radio transmissions and hundreds of oral histories telling the story of firefighters' rush to the twin towers on the morning of Sept. 11, 2001......"

    "15 hours of radio transmissions and 12,000 pages of oral histories"

    Does anyone know if they are doing to make this available on the internet or is this going to be something you have to request in writing?
    Last edited by Asstchief1630; 08-12-2005 at 12:52 PM.

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    STATEMENT FROM THE NEW YORK CITY FIRE DEPARTMENT REGARDING SEPTEMBER 11TH RECORDS RELEASE

    “Pursuant to a ruling issued by the New York State Court of Appeals on March 24, 2005, the Fire Department today is releasing additional records related to the terrorist attack on September 11, 2001. In accordance with this ruling, these materials are being released with appropriate redactions provided for under the court’s decision. Prior to the court’s ruling, the Fire Department voluntarily provided numerous materials related to the attacks. The Department believes that the materials being released today – including oral histories and radio communications – will serve to further confirm the bravery and courage of our members who responded to the World Trade Center. It is the Department’s hope that the release of these records will not cause our members and their families any additional pain or anguish.”
    Last edited by E40FDNYL35; 08-12-2005 at 09:48 PM.
    ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
    NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
    343
    CAPT. Frank Callahan Ladder 35 *
    LT. John Ginley Engine 40
    FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
    FF. Jimmy Giberson Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Otten Ladder 35 *
    FF. Steve Mercado Engine 40 *
    FF. Kevin Bracken Engine 40 *
    FF. Vincent Morello Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Roberts Ladder 35 *
    FF. Michael Lynch Engine 40
    FF. Michael Dauria Engine 40

    Charleston 9
    "If my job was easy a cop would be doing it."
    *******************CLICK HERE*****************

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    anyone that would like to listen to these recordings can do so at this site

    FDNY Radio Transmissions 9/11

    FDNY 10 CODES

    FDNY Car Assignments
    Last edited by BHFF22; 08-12-2005 at 02:22 PM.

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    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by BHFF22
    anyone that would like to listen to these recordings can do so at this site

    FDNY Radio Transmissions 9/11

    FDNY 10 CODES

    FDNY Car Assignments

    So, what is suppose to happen when you click on radio transmissions link?

    I didn't get anything.
    Stay Safe and Well Out There....

    Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptOldTimer
    So, what is suppose to happen when you click on radio transmissions link?

    I didn't get anything.
    Should open up to NY Times website - here is the address try copy and paste - see if that works

    http://www.nytimes.com/packages/html...tories_04.html

    or try clicking on the address above

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    These recordings are chilling.

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    I just listened to the Initial Emergence Call and was actually emotionally moved. I’m sure I’ll listen to more but not right now.

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    The unedited audio from all 22 tapes is also available on MSNBC.com, HERE.


    I've listened to several minutes of the first tape so far...very chilling and moving.

    Rob

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    wow i cant even imagine .....god bless you guys

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    I listented to the first tape and almost vomited..I will never be able to listen to that ever again. Very moving..very humbling as well.
    FF/NREMT-B

    FTM-PTB!!

    Brass does not equal brains.

    Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the ability to control it.

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    I've only listened to the first recording, but I'm amazed at how most people on the file managed to remain somewhat calm.

    But nevertheless, very disturbing...

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    WOW Wild stuff, Ya can picture in ya mind whats going on, Holy sh-t

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    August 13, 2005 -- Some things are better left unsaid. That's the feeling from New York's Bravest on the release yesterday of the radio calls made by their brothers just before they were lost on 9/11.
    Firefighters across the city told The Post yesterday the families of the victims of 9/11 should be given access to any information that was going to help give them closure, but were upset that The New York Times had fought to have the tapes released publicly. One captain, who asked not to be identified by name, said the constant reminders of 9/11 were just "reopening old wounds." "We're not going to forget our brothers — we have reminders everywhere," he said, gesturing to the pictures of lost firefighters on the walls of the station house. "But it's like picking off a scab."
    That captain lost more than 80 men he knew and spent six weeks at Ground Zero digging through the rubble looking for his friends. Even four years later, he said, the wounds are still raw, and constant reminders of that day around the city and from well-meaning tourists asking about the fall of the Twin Towers bring the memories back. "I think the reason people might want to hear it is that it's almost like they're there with [their loved ones] in their last moments — people just want to know," he said. But he will not listen to the tapes and, he said, nor would many of the firefighters he knows. "We're still fighting fires, we're still going on the rigs — we use the radios every day — it's like hearing ourselves talk. "We ran into the buildings and we'd do it again tomorrow." Another officer said the tapes would be too close to home for serving firefighters. "It's not something I'd be interested in hearing — I can imagine how bad it was that day, I don't want to hear those guys in trouble," the officer said. The men of Engine Co. 1 in Midtown feel the same way. "The general consensus is why it needs to be done," a lieutenant at the firehouse said. "I don't think they're thinking of the children of the people who were lost having to listen to that stuff. "It's just going to bring up a lot of bad memories." Many firefighters are also worried that the tapes will be used to pick apart the actions of those who died, looking for things they could have done differently. "The Fire Department operated magnificently, saved so many people, and everyone who died there was a hero," the Engine 1 lieutenant said. "It's something that we've come to accept in all the time that's passed, but if they're going to put it out there just to criticize, then that's not something we would like. "If [the tapes] are just being used to dramatize it, it's not a good thing."
    ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
    NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
    343
    CAPT. Frank Callahan Ladder 35 *
    LT. John Ginley Engine 40
    FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
    FF. Jimmy Giberson Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Otten Ladder 35 *
    FF. Steve Mercado Engine 40 *
    FF. Kevin Bracken Engine 40 *
    FF. Vincent Morello Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Roberts Ladder 35 *
    FF. Michael Lynch Engine 40
    FF. Michael Dauria Engine 40

    Charleston 9
    "If my job was easy a cop would be doing it."
    *******************CLICK HERE*****************

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    August 13, 2005 -- Heartbreaking oral histories of the horrors of the World Trade Center attacks released yesterday recount in vivid detail the memories of firefighters and medics who fought to save thousands amid the worst tragedy in American history.
    They lay bare terrible sights burned forever into the brains of the city's Bravest. Among the worst memories are recollections of the jumpers.

    "I noticed these black figures that were in the corner of my eye," said Assistant Fire Marshal Richard McCahey.

    "They were actually bodies ... and I remember saying, 'Listen, we are the professionals here. We got to compose ourselves.'"

    "It was like the night of the living dead," said Firefighter William Quick of Ladder 134. "Everyone had the thousand-mile stare on their eyes."

    For Lt. Murray Murad, who was inside the Engine 10 firehouse on Liberty St. in lower Manhattan, the fateful day began at 8:41 a.m. when "we heard a plane hovering over the firehouse. It sounded like the plane was right on top of us."

    Five minutes later a report crackled across the FDNY radio: "The World Trade Center Tower Number One is on fire!"

    But fear and shock did not diminish their bravery.

    Firefighter Kirk Long, whose Engine 1 was sent to the World Trade Center's north tower, the first to be struck by a plane and the second to collapse, remembered rushing up the stairs. "I was watching every person coming down, looked at their face, just to make them happy that they were getting out and we were going in, and everything was okay," Long said.

    "The civilians were orderly and blessing us and helping the injured down," said Firefighter Marcel Claes.

    "We made it up to the - I believe the 35th story. ... We felt this rumble and this noise, like a train was going through your living room."

    A chief then ordered them to "Drop everything and get out."

    John Felidi, an emergency medical technician, recalled hearing the rumble, saying he "looked - in the back of me all I seen was a monstrous - I can't even describe it. A cloud. Looked like debris, dust."

    "It reminded me of the 'Ten Commandments' when the green clouds come down on the street," said Deputy Fire Commissioner Thomas Fitzpatrick.

    Swirling smoke and choking concrete dust plunged the Trade Center into darkness. Chaos set in, fed by breakdowns in communication and overwhelmed emergency radio channels.

    "Every radio was jammed up," EMT Jeffrey Warner told department interviewers. "It was impossible to talk on the radio. Communication was zilch."

    "What you heard on the handy-talkies was you heard conflicting reports of guys saying hold in the first tower or - and you heard other guys saying, 'Get out,'" said Firefighter Joseph Meola. "You did hear Maydays, several Maydays. ... I don't remember exactly, just - that day is such a tough day."

    The word to evacuate never reached some but others were fortunate.

    Firefighter Paul Bessler said he heard "clear as day" a transmission warning of "imminent collapse. This was a terrorist attack. Evacuate."

    Though the firefighters and medics were the real heroes, they repeatedly praised - and thanked - civilians during the department interviews, which spanned 12,000 pages.

    "Everybody was offering us food, drink," paramedic James Murphy said. "We were sitting treating people and some guy ran past us with three knapsacks. He stopped and handed everybody a bottle of water. We could see the dust cloud, and he just ran in with bottles of water."

    Paramedic Michael Ober said that despite the devastating loss of life and any lingering trauma, the response by New Yorkers defeated the terrorists.

    "They tried so much to bring us down, whoever did this," Ober said. "It's just not gonna happen, you know? It's just so many awesome people out there. Just the way everybody's doing the job, it's unbelievable.

    "This city, I'm proud of where I work."


    Forever etched in their minds


    EMS Chief Walter Kowalczyk

    In my career I have managed many multiple-casualty incidents from plane crashes to severe train derailments, so managing high-scale incidents never scared me. However, as you're driving down West St. and you have to maneuver the vehicle to avoid driving over what appeared to be body parts as well as debris, my mouth went dry. I had to ensure the safety of the EMS work force. But how do I do this if I can't talk?


    EMT Michael Ober

    As we stepped out of the building, it was like, raining people... You could watch them fall from like the 90th floor all the way down. It's like you go to school for so long to be able to take care of people and treat them and be able to fix them when there's something wrong with them, and there's nothing, they hit the ground, and that's it. You just feel helpless, there's nothing you can do.


    James Canham, of Fire Patrol No. 3, was in the north tower when he heard terrorists were responsible.

    I called my wife and left a message on her machine. I said, "Baby, I love you. I don't think I'm going to make it home. Just take care of the kids. I'll be back."


    EMT Laura Siebuhr

    On the way there, there were two priests that were begging to stop us. They were saying, "Please take us with you. There are so many people down there that need their last rite." So I said, "Get in."


    Paramedic Louis Cook

    I just remember the smell of it being like a butcher shop with all the bodies around. I remember smelling that distinctly.

    Firefighter Kirk Long

    I was watching every person coming down, looked at their face, just to make them happy that they were getting out and we were going in, and everything was okay.


    Firefighter Edward Mecner was on the 23rd floor of the north tower when the south tower fell.

    Then within a minute or two, it sounded like a missile was about to come through the windows, I guess maybe on every floor, but it sounded like it was going to come right through the 23rd floor. Everyone automatically just hit the deck, like you do in a war movie.


    Deputy Commissioner Thomas Fitzpatrick

    Then the building started to come down. My initial reaction was that this was exactly the way it looks when they show you those implosions on TV...The thing that woke everybody up was the cloud of black material. It reminded me of the 10 Commandments when the green clouds come down on the street. The black cloud was coming down faster than the building.


    Deputy Chief Medical Officer David Prezant

    It was completely black. It was blacker than midnight. I could not see the sky. The air was like syrupy charcoal paste. Again, coughing, gagging, eyes irritating, hard to breathe, and the only thing that I could think of at the time that could explain this was that I was still buried.


    Chief Medical Officer Kerry Kelly

    I kept thinking, well, I'm not dead yet, I'm not dead yet, I'm not dead yet.


    Firefighter Timothy Burke

    It seemed pretty bad that everybody was willing to get on the phone and try to call their wives to say goodbye or say whatever... You kind of knew that some of us were going to get hurt because it was too too too much going on.


    Chief Salvatore Cassano was at the command post with Chief of Department Peter Ganci, who was killed.

    When the south tower collapsed, what we did was we either ran, got blown or fell down. I tried to call Chief Ganci on the handy talky...I was trying to find him, to let him know we still got a lot of people in the north building. We got to get them out of there.


    Firefighter Arthur Riccio

    We walked down Vesey St., and it was like total silence, nothing. It was eerie. There were police cars all parked on angles, metal going through their hoods. There was a tire of a plane on top of one. The guy said to me, "Run!" I turned around, and it was a tidal wave of black coming down on top of us... I couldn't put my mask on. I couldn't breathe. I was pulling cement out of my mouth.


    Paramedic Kenneth Davis

    What made it really bad was just trying to breathe... We found bottled water or whatever and cracked hydrants. You were just scooping water into your mouth and spitting mud out, and people were running by you and they're running in every direction because they didn't know which way to go.


    EMT Chad Ritorto

    It might sound stupid, but I would do it again if I had to. I'd do it all over again.


    Capt. Michael Donovan

    Chief Cassano was the first one - and this was early in the operation. He said: "Mike, if these buildings come down, we're in a terrible spot. We're right under these buildings." He said, "What we've got to do is get one of these buildings, one of the World Financial Center buildings, open." I went back to Chief Cassano and said, "Chief, I have a building. I have a building for you." Chief Cassano said, "Great. We're moving the command post." We went over and spoke to Chief Ganci, who was heavily engaged in deploying men... Chief Ganci saw that there was no way we were going to be able to move the command post. There were just too many people.


    Firefighter Thomas Piambino

    There was no one thing... that made me decide to get out. I just decided it was time to go... No one told me to get out... There was no handy-talkie communications that I heard. Whether they transmitted them or not, I can't say. I didn't hear it. I didn't hear it.


    Paul Curran, of Fire Patrol No. 3, talked about finding Fire Chaplain Mychal Judge, who was killed.

    He wasn't bleeding or anything like that.... Some guys from the truck company, they opened up his coat and they started working on him. With that, the building was shaking. It got very dark.


    Firefighter Marcel Claes was in the north tower.

    It was single file, civilians going down and firemen going up. The civilians were orderly and blessing us... We made it up to the - I believe the 35th story... We felt this rumble and this noise, like a train was going through your living room. Felt like an earthquake. A few minutes later, a chief...said to drop everything and get out, get out.
    ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
    NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
    343
    CAPT. Frank Callahan Ladder 35 *
    LT. John Ginley Engine 40
    FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
    FF. Jimmy Giberson Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Otten Ladder 35 *
    FF. Steve Mercado Engine 40 *
    FF. Kevin Bracken Engine 40 *
    FF. Vincent Morello Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Roberts Ladder 35 *
    FF. Michael Lynch Engine 40
    FF. Michael Dauria Engine 40

    Charleston 9
    "If my job was easy a cop would be doing it."
    *******************CLICK HERE*****************

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    August 13, 2005 -- Some of the families of firefighters killed on 9/11 said yesterday they were outraged that it took so long to win the release of communications of their loved ones during the terror attacks. "It is an accomplishment and a relief to finally receive [the audiotapes and other records], so we can continue trying to understand and learn from the events of 9/11," said Norman Siegel, a civil-rights attorney representing the eight families involved in the years-long lawsuit against the FDNY. "It should never be a battle to find the truth." Family members said the tapes and an internal FDNY oral history compiled shortly after the attacks confirmed their suspicions that emergency communications systems did not work correctly.
    The families charged that faulty radios may have been responsible for the deaths of some firefighters on Sept. 11 and hoped the new records would challenge the notion that many firefighters in the north tower heard, but chose to ignore, an evacuation message issued after the south tower collapsed at 9:59 a.m. "I knew the radios were flawed," admitted retired Fire Capt. Al Fuentes, who was working that morning. "That's why I survived — we resorted to hand signals." But at least one fire lieutenant, Gregg Hansson of Engine Co. 34, said he heard the call to evacuate while he was on the 35th floor of the north tower, and saw his colleagues leaving. "I was in the vicinity of the battalion chief, who was on the command channel, when I heard a mayday given over the command channel to evacuate the building," Hansson said in his oral history. Sally Regenhard, who lost her son Christian in the attacks, blamed the death of her son on "a massive betrayal of trust, a massive collapse of the firefighter radio communications system."
    ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
    NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
    343
    CAPT. Frank Callahan Ladder 35 *
    LT. John Ginley Engine 40
    FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
    FF. Jimmy Giberson Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Otten Ladder 35 *
    FF. Steve Mercado Engine 40 *
    FF. Kevin Bracken Engine 40 *
    FF. Vincent Morello Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Roberts Ladder 35 *
    FF. Michael Lynch Engine 40
    FF. Michael Dauria Engine 40

    Charleston 9
    "If my job was easy a cop would be doing it."
    *******************CLICK HERE*****************

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    I am sure that we'd all be moving in alongside those that did respond that day.I would have preferred that no one except the bastards that pulled this off that day had died,though.



    [QUOTE=E40FDNYL35]August 13, 2005 -- Heartbreaking oral histories of the horrors of the World Trade Center attacks released yesterday recount in vivid detail the memories of firefighters and medics who fought to save thousands amid the worst tragedy in American history.
    They lay bare terrible sights burned forever into the brains of the city's Bravest. Among the worst memories are recollections of the jumpers.


    EMT Chad Ritorto

    It might sound stupid, but I would do it again if I had to. I'd do it all over again.

    QUOTE]

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    Default Fdny-343

    Quote Originally Posted by E40FDNYL35
    Many firefighters are also worried that the tapes will be used to pick apart the actions of those who died, looking for things they could have done differently.
    E40FDNYL35,
    I've made sure (& will continue to defend) the actions of the FDNY that day. This went way beyond a "pressured filled morning" for our Brothers. The actions taken were beyond heroic. Decisions made that day were done with the intention of saving as many civilian lives as possible. The FDNY did just that.

    Aron Saffell
    Garland Fire Dept (Texas)
    http://teamsaffell.com/GFD/FDNY343.html
    Saffell
    1 Corinthians 1:18
    For the message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.

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    "Many firefighters are also worried that the tapes will be used to pick apart the actions of those who died, looking for things they could have done differently."

    I hope nobody, wether on this site or the public has the balls to "monday-night quarter back" this incident (they should of done this or done that - they did this wrong or that wrong.... etc etc). They are nothing but a low life piece of %^$#%&*. there is nothing to prepare you mentally and physically for an incident like this and FDNY did a friggen awesome job. Hats off to you guys.

    The tapes should be used for the families closures (if they want) and to see what improvements can be made to help the firefighters if this incident was to ever happen again. exsample - the obvious communicatin problems - by the way, did the city take care of that yet?????

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    Quote Originally Posted by Asstchief1630
    ....ex-sample - the obvious communicatin problems - by the way, did the city take care of that yet?????
    no...
    ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
    NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
    343
    CAPT. Frank Callahan Ladder 35 *
    LT. John Ginley Engine 40
    FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
    FF. Jimmy Giberson Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Otten Ladder 35 *
    FF. Steve Mercado Engine 40 *
    FF. Kevin Bracken Engine 40 *
    FF. Vincent Morello Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Roberts Ladder 35 *
    FF. Michael Lynch Engine 40
    FF. Michael Dauria Engine 40

    Charleston 9
    "If my job was easy a cop would be doing it."
    *******************CLICK HERE*****************

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    Unhappy Mixed feelings

    I'm not quite sure how to feel after hearing these tapes played on the radio this morning. I could only get through a few minutes of listening to it before I reached my breaking point and told my wife to turn it off. I'm glad that some people have closure on their lives, but these are the last words of hero's. That haunting sound of PASS alarms going off will once again haunt me for a while. I agree that 9/11 was a long time ago, but I still feel uncomfortable listening to the last words of men who didn't know they were going to die.

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    Some i managed to listen to the rest of them today, Words can't descrive it, felt like it was happening all over again

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    Most of my shift including two brand new probies listened to the first 3 tapes today. They were speechless and I could feel the hair raise up on my neck and had goose bumps. I fought back tears as the moment the first tower came down was relived and then again as the 2nd fell. I did not lose anyone I knew in person that day, but I had a friend from Rescue 1 who was there and survived. But I did lose 343 brothers and I will never forget them or second guess them.

    As someone said in an earlier post, I hope no one comes here doing that.

    By the way...anyone go to the link posted by britfan1? When you open it and select the various tapes it says "not available."
    09-11 .. 343 "All Gave Some..Some Gave ALL" God Bless..R.I.P.
    ------------------------------
    IACOJ Minister of Southern Comfort
    "Purple Hydrant" Recipient (3 Times)
    BMI Investigator
    ------------------------------
    The comments, opinions, and positions expressed here are mine. They are expressed respectfully, in the spirit of safety and progress. They do not reflect the opinions or positions of my employer or my department.

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    but I still feel uncomfortable listening to the last words of men who didn't know they were going to die.
    They knew. Maybe not for sure, but they knew.

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    Quote Originally Posted by E229Lt
    They knew. Maybe not for sure, but they knew.
    Which is what makes their sacrifice all that more heroic (in MY opinion, of course - before anyone jumps on my comment). You could see it in their eyes, in some of what are the most heartbreaking images from that day ... yes, they knew.

    I haven't listened at all. All it took was hearing it for 1 or 2 seconds on the radio the day the news came out to bring tears to my eyes. It will be hard, but I'm sure I'll listen at some point in time, as a way to remember and honor those killed, if that makes sense to anyone.
    September 11th - Never Forget

    I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

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    Sept 11, 2001 I was speechless. After listening to most of the tapes (and I dont really know why I am - its a hard thing to do!) I am speechless. It just draws up the raw emotion......what a loss. I would so much like to find the right words to express my condolences appropriatly, the problem is I dont think their are any words that are appropriate........
    Sad stuff - and I whole heartyedly agree with E40FDNYL35 and captnstan, anybody that back yard qb's this should be beaten! Use these tapes to honour these me and women thatr gave their lives!
    -I have learned people will forget what you said,
    -People will forget what you did,
    -But people will never forget how you made them feel!

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    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 08-26-2005, 09:51 AM
  4. We have to look into our darkest day
    By harlemBrother in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-02-2002, 07:41 PM
  5. MY PRAYERS TO OUR FELLOW EMERGENCY WORKERS IN NEW YORK
    By actionj21 in forum Line of Duty: In Memory Of
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: 09-21-2001, 05:20 PM

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