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  1. #21
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    I prefer to jam the hose through the handle, but others here make the loop a bit longer and then bend it all the way around the front of the nozzle. Either way you have got to be sure to pull both the nozzle AND the loop

    And as stated the engineer should not be charging until the wave of the hand by the firefighter

    Birken


  2. #22
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    Both my paid department and my volunteer department use the triple lay. We've had good experiences with them other than the occasional hang ups mentioned in other posts. The one recurring problem we have had is with firefighters not grabbing the loop when they make the stretch or they call for the line to be charged before removing the loop from the nozzle bail. Both of these issues can be fixed with training, but with a high turnover rate for firefighters at both of my departments, sometimes we get some pretty new people pulling lines. The solution to our problems came from using a piece of old tire inner tube. Cut a strip of the tube out about 6" x 10" then cut a slit down the middle of this strip making sure to leave a few inches on either end so the strip doesn't tear in half when stretched. When repacking the triple lay on the rig, slide the nozzle tip and the loop of hose through the slit in the inner tube. This will hold the two together so if the nozzleman only grabs the nozzle, the loop of hose should stay with it. If the line gets charged too early, the rubber inner tube will stretch allowing you to still remove the loop. They are cheap, if not free, to make and if one gets lost or messed up, you still have the rest of the inner tube to make a new one. Hope this helps someone out, it's been really good for us!

  3. #23
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    Demarse, I have been to that academy in WI...It is awesome, especially that they have FDNY guys teaching there!

    What qualifications do you have to have to instruct there? I could really use the extra $$$.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeezNutz4u
    Demarse, I have been to that academy in WI...It is awesome, especially that they have FDNY guys teaching there!

    What qualifications do you have to have to instruct there? I could really use the extra $$$.
    Paper routes don't pay what they used to, huh?

  5. #25
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    We used the triple layer crosslays on our engines for about five years. For the reasons previously posted they worked well and likewise caused problems. They pulled off nice in a straight line but next to a row of cars or a fence line it was a real pain. We palyed around for about two months developing a hybrid load. Our issue was that our pre-connect beds are double width making the minuteman difficult at best. The triple layer won out for our 250' preconnected 2 1/2". But the 1 3/4" is its own new animal. We wanted a load that would pull out quickly (like the triple layer), could go around corners, and finish with 50' at the objective (floor or door). No small task.
    This is what we ended up with:
    start with 2 layersof flat load
    next triple layer all but the final 50'.
    the final 50' are formed into a horseshoe finish.

    To pull you grab the hoseshoe and a loop formed below the triple layer. This pulls everything out in 2 lengths of the bed. The horseshoe is advanced to the objective and the triple layer pays out the hose in between. That is the easy part.

    Teaching the load was difficult but not imposible, and well worth it.

  6. #26
    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
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    Used it and simply dont like it. I like the flat load better that I can shoulder load and have some working line when I get to my destination.

    Hope that helps alittle...

  7. #27
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    A little flagging will help with alot of the problems mentioned, you could also probably use masking tape if you don't have a source for flagging but don't go crazy wrapping it around the hose or it may not break. We tie a piece of flagging about every 8-10 feet and a piece around the hose and nozzle. The flagging will break when the hose is charged, it keeps the load all together until then, this helps with loading and prevents it falling apart and speghetti-ing when pulling the hose. We have our quick lays in small boxes mounted at the bottom of the engine, the triple fold is actually loaded in a horseshoe pattern, it feeds out and loads easily and we can pull the hose towards the front or rear of the engine as well as straight out to the side.

  8. #28
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    We use the triple layer on every single line with a nozzle attached.Great for quick deployment and relatively easy to re-pack. We love it.

  9. #29
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    We use triple load and found the same problems as mentioned so we put a couple additional changes on it. First, our preconnect beds are double wide, so we put the bottom two layers with loops on them. This way if you have a fence or cars next to the engine you can pull it like a skid and drop it on the ground, or pull the two loops flip the load and shoulder it so it pulls off the top. This is not as difficult as it sounds with the double wide load. Second, since our preconnects are crosslays we put a loop on the opposite side top of the load. That way we can pull both preconnects off the same side if we need to. We just pull the top loop through on the opposite side facing line until we get the nozzle and then walk it out as per normal. Our 2.5 preconnect is off the rear so it is loaded as a standard triple. The triple load is not without it's problems but so far it has worked the best and we have tried multiple hose loads. Our second favorite(still first with some members) is the minuteman. The only problem with this load is you have to walk it all the way out to avoid kinks and most of our fires occur in residential type dwellings and they are usually only 40 to 50 feet from the street. So using the triple usually puts us right at the front door with only two bends in the line instead of having 200' snaked throughout the front yard.

  10. #30
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    My department switched to this lay a few months ago and the only problem we have found is the size of our compartments. they are just a wee bit to narrow. also we are a combination department so some of our volunteers wont take the time to learn it, which causes problems the next time you try to pull it. overall it is a great lay, if you have the right size compartment.

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlitzfireSolo
    We switched to the triple layer load a few years ago with great success. Just make sure that the loop under the nozzle is clearly visible and accessible - anything less will ensure that somebody pulls it wrong (i.e. pulling nozzle only).

    In my opinion, the triple layer load is the best textbook hose load. I think that the ultimate load for a crosslay/rear preconnect would be a combination between the minute man and the triple layer, but it would be a pain to ensure that people always packed it right.

    That having been said, we're switching to donut rolled preconnect load on our new engine, which I believe is superior to any bed-load.

    I've never heard of the donut rolled preconnect. Can you discribe or show me a picture of this. I mean I think I have a mental pic??...I know what a donut roll is!!!

  12. #32
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    I like the triple layer, but, it can cause problems if you are attempting to lay an uncharged line up stairs or ladders. It just doesn't flake off your shoulder like a flat or minuteman load. Other than that, I think it's a good load for 150' crosslays, bumper lines, etc. We carry 150' of 2.5" in a triple layer on top of 100' flat loaded. With this set up, we can pull 150' of 2.5" off with minimum of kinks, yet get some decent distance from the pumper.

  13. #33
    Forum Member fireman4949's Avatar
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    We started using the triple layer load on all of our 1-3/4" preconnects (150' and 200' cross lays and 250' and 350' rear bed lays) about 15 or so years ago, with the exception of the bumper line which is a 75' accordian. We can deploy the bumper line in nothing flat.

    We have had great success with the triple layer and found very few instances where they have made line advancement difficult. There will always be situations where deploying a preconnect has its problems, but overall, I think it's a great load and works well for us.

    We have not used it for 2-1/2". We carry 850' of 2-1/2" on the rear bed and just pull whatever is needed.




    Kevin
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  14. #34
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    It's the only one we use for the preconnects, works excellent. We love it.
    FF/NREMT-B

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  15. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by ff5121
    Our second favorite(still first with some members) is the minuteman. The only problem with this load is you have to walk it all the way out to avoid kinks and most of our fires occur in residential type dwellings and they are usually only 40 to 50 feet from the street. So using the triple usually puts us right at the front door with only two bends in the line instead of having 200' snaked throughout the front yard.
    Thats why we switched.
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  16. #36
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    I am a big fan of the triple layer load although I recognize in some instances the flat or minute man load is better suited.

    One dept. I worked on, half the crosslays were triple layer, half were flat.

    My vol. dept., well, I've been trying to force a little change.

    Maybe I've missed something in the thread, but one of the best parts of the triple layer is pulling it in a tight space. Two firefighters, one takes the nozzle, one takes the loop. Walk in opposite directions down the length of the truck and it will flake out beautifully. This makes it a great pack for MVA use on narrow roads or highways. If you're pulling your triple layer with one guy walking straight out, you're missing 50% of the advantage the triple layer provides.

    As for putting the loop through the bale, in my experience, is beneficial. If you drill it into everyone's head to remove the loop from the bale when you grab it, you won't have problems.

    An engineer charging a line before it is called for presents a much bigger problem than just the effect of getting the loop stuck in the bale.

    The biggest problem I've seen with it is finding room to pack it, but that can be done at the station if it come down to it.

  17. #37
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    Default hose loads?

    Pardon my ignorance, but would anyone have a picture handy ?

  18. #38
    Forum Member fireman4949's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtlboater
    Pardon my ignorance, but would anyone have a picture handy ?

    http://www.marionfd.com/TRAINING/triple_load.htm

    I hope the link works.




    Kevin
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    IAFF Local 2339
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  19. #39
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    We have used triple lays for at least the last 15 years.

    all are 200ft. 1-1/2" on the engines. Works good as long as you pull the loop as well.
    Jason Knecht
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    Altoona Fire Dept.
    Altoona, WI

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  20. #40
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    We just experimented with the triple layer load and had a positive review from the officers and other firefighters in my dept. But, we have not had this long enough to find-out the problems that exist. After reading this tread, I have noticed that many of you say you have to grab the nozzle and the first loop. My question is, what happens if you do not grab the first loop with the nozzle, is the load still able to be deployed in a somewhat efficent manner?

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