+ Reply to Thread
Page 5 of 12 First ... 2345678 ... Last
  1. #101
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Default

    By BRETT MARTEL
    Associated Press Writer
    NEW ORLEANS (AP) - Rescuers along the hurricane-ravaged Gulf
    Coast pushed aside the dead to reach the living Tuesday in a race
    against time and rising waters, while New Orleans sank deeper into
    crisis and Louisiana's governor ordered storm refugees out of this
    drowning city.
    Two levees broke and sent water coursing into the streets of the
    Big Easy a full day after New Orleans appeared to have escaped
    widespread destruction from Hurricane Katrina. An estimated 80
    percent of the below-sea-level city was under water, up to 20 feet
    deep in places, with miles and miles of homes swamped.
    "The situation is untenable," Gov. Kathleen Blanco said.
    "It's just heartbreaking."
    One Mississippi county alone said its death toll was at least
    100, and officials are "very, very worried that this is going to
    go a lot higher," said Joe Spraggins, civil defense director for
    Harrison County, home to Biloxi and Gulfport.
    Thirty of the victims in the county were from a beachfront
    apartment building that collapsed under a 25-foot wall of water as
    Katrina slammed the Gulf Coast with 145-mph winds. And Louisiana
    officials said many were feared dead there, too, making Katrina one
    of the most punishing storms to hit the United States in decades.
    After touring the destruction by air, Mississippi Gov. Haley
    Barbour said it is not of case of homes being severely damaged,
    "they're simply not there. ... I can only imagine that this is
    what Hiroshima looked like 60 years ago."
    New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin said hundreds, if not thousands, of
    people may still be stuck on roofs and in attics, and so rescue
    boats were bypassing the dead.
    "We're not even dealing with dead bodies," Nagin said.
    "They're just pushing them on the side."
    The flooding in New Orleans grew worse by the minute, prompting
    the evacuation of hotels and hospitals and an audacious plan to
    drop huge sandbags from helicopters to close up one of the breached
    levees. At the same time, looting broke out in some neighborhoods,
    the sweltering city of 480,000 had no drinkable water, and the
    electricity could be out for weeks.
    With water rising perilously inside the Superdome, Blanco said
    the tens of thousands of refugees now huddled there and other
    shelters in New Orleans would have to be evacuated.
    She asked residents to spend Wednesday in prayer.
    "That would be the best thing to calm our spirits and thank our
    Lord that we are survivors," she said. "Slowly, gradually, we
    will recover; we will survive; we will rebuild."
    A helicopter view of the devastation over the New Orleans area
    revealed people standing on black rooftops baking in the sunshine
    while waiting for rescue boats. A row of desperately needed
    ambulances were lined up on the interstate, water blocking their
    path. Roller coasters jutted out from the water at a Six Flags
    amusement park. Hundreds of inmates were seen standing on a highway
    because the prison had been flooded.
    Sen. Mary Landrieu quietly traced the sign of the cross across
    her head and chest as she looked out at St. Bernard Parish, where
    only roofs peaked out from the water.
    "The whole parish is gone," Landrieu said.
    All day long, rescuers in boats and helicopters pulled out
    shellshocked and bedraggled flood refugees from rooftops and
    attics. The Coast Guard said it has rescued 1,200 people by boat
    and air, some placed shivering and wet into helicopter baskets.
    They were brought by the truckload into shelters, some in
    wheelchairs and some carrying babies, with stories of survival and
    of those who didn't make it.
    "Oh my God, it was hell," said Kioka Williams, who had to hack
    through the ceiling of the beauty shop where she worked as
    floodwaters rose in New Orleans' low-lying Ninth Ward. "We were
    screaming, hollering, flashing lights. It was complete chaos."
    Frank Mills was in a boarding house in the same neighborhood
    when water started swirling up toward the ceiling and he fled to
    the roof. Two elderly residents never made it out, and a third was
    washed away trying to climb onto the roof.
    "He was kind of on the edge of the roof, catching his breath,"
    Mills said. "Next thing I knew, he came floating past me."
    Across Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama, more than 1 million
    residents remained without electricity, some without clean drinking
    water. An untold number who heeded evacuation orders were displaced
    and 40,000 were in Red Cross shelters, with officials saying it
    could be weeks, if not months, before most will be able to return.
    Emergency medical teams from across the country were sent into
    the region and President Bush cut short his Texas vacation Tuesday
    to return to Washington to focus on the storm damage.
    Federal Emergency Management Agency director Mike Brown warned
    that structural damage to homes, diseases from animal carcasses and
    chemicals in floodwaters made it unsafe for residents to come home
    anytime soon. And a mass return also was discouraged to keep from
    interfering with rescue and recovery efforts.
    That was made tough enough by the vast expanse of floodwaters in
    coastal areas that took an eight-hour pounding from Katrina's
    howling winds and up to 15 inches of rainfall. From the air,
    neighborhood after neighborhood looked like nothing but islands of
    rooftops surrounded by swirling, tea-colored water.
    In New Orleans, the flooding actually got worse Tuesday. Failed
    pumps and levees apparently spilled water from Lake Pontchartrain
    into streets. The rising water forced hotels to evacuate, led a
    hospital to boatlift patients to emergency shelters, and drove the
    staff of New Orleans' Times-Picayune newspaper out of its offices.
    Officials planned to use helicopters to drop 3,000-pound
    sandbags and dozens of giant concrete barriers into the breach, and
    expressed confidence the problem could be solved. But if the water
    rose a couple feet higher, it could wipe out water system for whole
    city, said New Orleans' homeland security chief Terry Ebbert.
    A clearer picture of the destruction in Alabama became to emerge
    Tuesday: cement slabs where homes once stood, a 100-foot shrimp
    boat smoldering on its side, people searching for swept-away
    keepsakes. The damage in some areas appears to be worse than last
    year's Hurricane Ivan.
    In devastated Biloxi, Miss., areas that were not underwater were
    littered with tree trunks, downed power lines and chunks of broken
    concrete. Some buildings were flattened.
    The string of floating barge casinos crucial to the coastal
    economy were a shambles. At least three of them were picked up by
    the storm surge and carried inland, their barnacle-covered hulls
    sitting up to 200 yards inland.
    The deadliest spot yet appeared to be Biloxi's Quiet Water Beach
    apartments, where authorities said about 30 people were washed
    away. All that was left of the red-brick building was a concrete
    slab.
    "We grabbed a lady and pulled her out the window and then we
    swam with the current," 55-year-old Joy Schovest said through
    tears. "It was terrifying. You should have seen the cars floating
    around us. We had to push them away when we were trying to swim."
    Said Biloxi Mayor A. J. Holloway: "This is our tsunami."
    Looting became a problem in both Biloxi and in New Orleans, in
    some cases in full view of police and National Guardsmen. One
    police officer was shot in the head by a looter in New Orleans, but
    was expected to recover, Sgt. Paul Accardo, a police spokesman.
    On New Orleans' Canal Street, which actually resembled a canal,
    dozens of looters ripped open the steel gates on clothing and
    jewelry stores, some packing plastic garbage cans with loot to
    float down the street. One man, who had about 10 pairs of jeans
    draped over his left arm, was asked if he was salvaging things from
    his store.
    "No," the man shouted, "that's EVERYBODY'S store!"
    Looters at a Wal-Mart brazenly loaded up shopping carts with
    items including micorwaves, coolers and knife sets. Others walked
    out of a sporting goods store on Canal Street with armfuls of shoes
    and football jerseys.
    Outside the broken shells of Biloxi's casinos, people picked
    through slot machines to see if they still contained coins and
    ransacked other businesses. "People are just casually walking in
    and filling up garbage bags and walking off like they're Santa
    Claus," said Marty Desei, owner of a Super 8 motel.
    Insurance experts estimated the storm will result in up to $25
    billion in insured losses. That means Katrina could prove more
    costly than record-setting Hurricane Andrew in 1992, which caused
    an inflation-adjusted $21 billion in losses.
    Oil prices jumped by more than $3 a barrel on Tuesday, climbing
    above $70 a barrel, amid uncertainty about the extent of the damage
    to the Gulf region's refineries and drilling platforms.
    By midday Tuesday, Katrina was downgraded to a tropical
    depression, with winds around 35 mph. It was moving northeast
    through Tennessee at around 21 mph, with the potential to dump 8
    inches of rain and spin off deadly tornadoes.
    Katrina left 11 people dead in its soggy jog across South
    Florida last week, as a much weaker storm.
    ---
    Associated Press reporters Holbrook Mohr, Mary Foster, Allen G.
    Breed, Brett Martel, Adam Nossiter and Jay Reeves contributed to
    this report.
    ---
    On the Net:
    National Hurricane Center: http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

    (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  2. #102
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Default

    Associated Press Writer
    BILOXI, Miss. (AP) - Joy Schovest swam for her life, fighting
    Hurricane Katrina's storm surge and its angry winds, brushing aside
    debris and floating cars to reach higher ground.
    Behind her, at least 30 of her neighbors in the Quiet Water
    Beach apartments were dying, trapped in their crumbling two-story
    building as it was swept away with much of this Mississippi coast
    community Monday.
    "We grabbed a lady and pulled her out the window and then we
    swam with the current," said Schovest, 55, breaking into tears.
    "It was terrifying. You should have seen the cars floating around
    us. We had to push them away when we were trying to swim."
    The tragedy at the apartment building represented the biggest
    known cluster of deaths caused by Katrina.
    Joe Spraggins, civil defense director for Harrison County, home
    to Biloxi and Gulfport, said the county's death toll was at least
    100, and officials were "very, very worried that this is going to
    go a lot higher."
    The only remaining evidence of the Quiet Water Beach apartments
    was a concrete slab surrounded by a heap of red bricks that were
    once the building's walls. A crushed red toy wagon, jewelry,
    clothing and twisted boards were mixed in with the debris. The
    four-lane road that separated the building from the beachfront was
    buckled and covered with rubble.
    "This is all that's left of my house," said nearby resident
    Jack Crochet, 56, shaking his head and looking at the rubble.
    "It's never going to be the same. It's over."
    The storm also inflicted a punishing blow to Biloxi's waterfront
    casinos, down the beach from the apartment building. At least three
    of the floating barge casinos were tossed from their moorings by
    the storm's 25-foot wall of water, their barnacle-covered hulls
    coming to rest up to 200 yards inland.
    Aerial footage showed the Grand Casino landed on the side of a
    busy highway. "I think it will have to be cut into pieces simply
    to be moved out of there," Gary Loveman, chairman of Harrah's
    Entertainment Inc., told CNBC.
    At the Treasure Bay Casino, people examined the slot machines to
    see if they still contained coins, and looting broke out in other
    areas of Biloxi.
    "People are just casually walking in and filling up garbage
    bags and walking off like they're Santa Claus," said Marty Desei,
    owner of a Super 8 motel in Biloxi. "I haven't seen anything like
    this in my whole life."
    The lucky ones in the Quiet Water Beach apartment building and
    other vulnerable areas of Biloxi described a scene of pandemonium
    as they fled the rising water. When asked why they ignored
    evacuation orders, some said they did not think the storm would be
    that bad; others would not give a reason.
    Apartment tenant Landon Williams, a 19-year-old construction
    worker, said he and his grandmother and uncle ran from the
    crumbling building as the storm hit. As they later swam through the
    swirling water and debris, "we watched the apartments
    disintegrate. You could hear the big pieces of wood cracking and
    breaking apart."
    He said the winds flung two-by-fours and drywall.
    "I lost everything. We can't even find my car," he said. "I'm
    looking through this wreckage to see if I can find anything that's
    mine. If not, I'm moving on. I think I'll move on to North Carolina
    and do some work over there. I can't take it here anymore - not
    after this."
    Williams said six of his neighbors in the building who remained
    behind also survived. "As the second story collapsed, they climbed
    onto the roof and part of it floated away and they floated to a
    house that made it," he said.
    Paul Merritt, 30, surveyed the damage in Biloxi with his
    18-year-old wife and their 3-month-old son, Brandon. He said the
    water rose to the second story of his townhouse, which is less than
    a block off the beach.
    "I've never seen destruction of this magnitude," Merritt said.
    "You see this stuff on TV and you hope that it never happens to
    you. Everything's gone."
    Ida Punzo rode out the s torm with a friend and two neighbors in
    her 130-year-old home on the beachfront in Biloxi. The first two
    floors of the old house were almost completely gone, but she
    survived.
    "It was a miracle," Punzo said. "This place is held together
    with God's spit. We're not supposed to be alive."
    ---
    Associated Press Writer Jay Reeves contributed to this report.

    (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  3. #103
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Default

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) - New Mexico National Guardsmen, dozens
    of volunteers from several local organizations and electrical
    workers are headed to the Gulf Coast to offer aid to the victims of
    Hurricane Katrina.
    Gov. Bill Richardson has ordered 200 members of the guard to aid
    in the hurricane relief effort. The troops will be used for their
    areas of expertise - transportation, military policing and medical
    support.
    Brig. Gen. Kenny Montoya, the state National Guard's commander,
    said during a news conference Tuesday that the troops have yet to
    be given a specific mission but they have lifesaving training that
    will surely benefit those in need.
    Montoya said the troops will remain in Louisiana and Mississippi
    "as long as American lives are in jeopardy."
    Richardson, who requested the National Guard's help late Monday,
    said his heart goes out to the victims.
    "I would ask New Mexico to say a prayer for all those
    afflicted," he said.
    Public Service Company of New Mexico will send a caravan on
    Wednesday of 28 linemen and other support employees to help restore
    power to hurricane-damaged areas.
    The employees will spend two to three weeks helping restore
    electricity to customers served by Entergy, a utility that
    estimates it has 1.1 million customers without power in the two
    states.
    So far, 13 volunteers from the American Red Cross, 35 with the
    Disaster Medical Assistance Team and 23 with the local U.S. Army
    Corps Of Engineers will offer their services.
    Edwina Larner, local director of Emergency Services Public
    Relations, said the Red Cross contingent left for Texas on Monday.
    It included volunteers from Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Farmington and
    Las Cruces.
    Piper Gibson, director of operations and support for the
    Southwestern New Mexico Chapter of the American Red Cross in Las
    Cruces, said more volunteers are expected to head out later in the
    week.
    Gibson said the people sent to the region are very experienced
    volunteers.
    "It's not a cushy job, believe me," he said. "These people
    have to be able to commit to two to three weeks, staying in the
    shelters, eating the same meals as the people they're trying to
    help, no air conditioning. They experience the same elements that
    those people are experiencing. We don't put them up in a hotel."
    Volunteers will hand out food and water in storm-battered areas,
    and some will offer counseling, Larner said.
    Members of the Disaster Medical Assistance Team were called to
    duty Saturday evening, but had to wait until Monday afternoon
    before heading into areas hardest hit by Katrina.
    Mike Richards, a University of New Mexico doctor who heads the
    team, said the group once it arrives will take about two hours to
    set up tents and equipment and start seeing patients.
    "We carry enough materials to be self-sufficient for 72
    hours," Richards said by telephone while traveling. "A typical
    mission can last up to two weeks."
    The Army Corps of Engineers group from Albuquerque was last sent
    on a mission about a month ago, when Hurricane Dennis ripped
    through the Florida Panhandle and parts of Alabama, Russ Jaramillo
    said.
    Jaramillo, a civil engineer with the corps, said they have
    several response teams that go to disaster sites. Each team focuses
    on a task, such as ice, water, power, debris removal, structural
    assessment or temporary housing.
    The local team has been put on alert, he said. If members are
    needed, 16 volunteers and seven members of the ice team will be
    ready to help where power failures have put out refrigeration
    capacity.
    If and when his team is deployed, Jaramillo said, the first
    concern is helping people.
    "The basic essential needs come first - food, shelter, water,"
    he said. "Secondary comes cleaning of debris, sanitation and
    providing power."
    Seven firefighters from Farmington packed up their equipment
    Monday and said goodbye to their families after being called to
    serve on New Mexico Task Force One, which will help with urban
    search and rescue and swift-water rescues.
    Tom Anderson left behind his son and pregnant wife.
    "It makes me sad to leave them, but they're in good hands. The
    guys with the fire department will check in and make sure they're
    doing OK," said Anderson, who could be gone as long as 14 days.
    Roadrunner Food Bank moved itself into "disaster response
    mode" on Monday as it prepared to help sister food banks impacted
    by the hurricane. Those include food banks in Louisiana, Alabama,
    Mississippi and Florida.

    (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  4. #104
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Default

    By BILL KACZOR
    Associated Press Writer
    PENSACOLA, Fla. (AP) - Richard and Sarah Trimble's storm-damaged
    home still needs repairs, but that didn't stop them Tuesday from
    heading for Mississippi to help feed victims of Hurricane Katrina.
    The Pensacola couple were among more than 100 members of two
    faith-based organizations from across Florida who set out for
    Alabama and Mississippi in a 31-truck convoy, including mobile
    kitchens and a shower trailer.
    Gov. Jeb Bush was on hand to see them off at Olive Baptist
    Church. The convoy then split in two. A Southern Baptist Disaster
    Relief contingent went to Hattiesburg, Miss., and a Salvation Army
    group to Mobile, Ala., although it is likely to later be sent
    farther west.
    "It's payback time as far as I'm concerned," Bush said later.
    He noted that volunteers and government agencies from across the
    nation came to Florida's aid last year, when four hurricanes struck
    the state.
    One of those, Hurricane Ivan, ripped open the roof of the
    Trimbles' home, causing severe water damage inside, last September.
    The roof has been fixed but the interior has yet to be completely
    repaired.
    Sarah Trimble, a retired university administrator, said she
    wasn't worried about that as the couple joined the Southern Baptist
    contingent.
    "It's just stuff," she said. "We feel this is where God has
    called us to serve."
    They are veteran Southern Baptist disaster volunteers as part of
    a unit that cooks food then usually distributed by the Salvation
    Army or Red Cross. They spent a week in New York City after the
    Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks to feed police and firefighters,
    worked all four hurricanes in 2004 and earlier this year went to
    Indonesia to help tsunami victims.
    They had a hotel room in New York, but that was an exception.
    They expected more familiar accommodations in Hattiesburg.
    "We spend most of our life on church floors," Sarah said with
    a smile. "So we've learned which air mattresses have the better
    quality."
    Katrina killed 11 people in South Florida last week and then
    crossed the Gulf of Mexico where it again made landfall in
    Louisiana, causing more death and destruction from there to the
    Florida Panhandle. The Gulf Coast death toll was uncertain but at
    least 100 deaths were confirmed in a single Mississippi county. No
    Panhandle fatalities were reported.
    The Panhandle, also hit by Hurricane Dennis in July, received
    only a glancing blow, but Katrina still closed bridges, flooded
    streets, knocked out power and eroded beaches.
    Interstate 10 and U.S. 98 bridges, both linking Pensacola to
    points east, were back open Tuesday. Katrina also closed U.S. 98
    between Fort Walton Beach and Destin, but state transportation
    officials expected to get two of the four lanes reopened Wednesday
    night.
    Gulf Power Co. crews worked through the night to restore service
    to 90,000 homes and businesses, leaving about 38,000 still without
    power Tuesday. About 1,000 rural cooperative customers also
    remained without power.
    The Florida Reliability Coordinating Council urged the public to
    conserve electricity because the natural gas facilities in the Gulf
    had been shut down. Natural gas is the primary fuel for about a
    third of the electricity generated for the Florida Peninsula.
    Florida search and rescue units from Miami-Dade, Duval and
    Hillsborough counties also were in Mississippi or en route while
    the Florida National Guard was activated and ready to help if
    called upon, Bush said. He said three Pensacola hospitals were
    helping evacuate patients from Tulane University's hospital in New
    Orleans.
    The Red Cross was keeping shelters open in Florida for Katrina
    victims who cannot yet return home while Coast Guard units from
    across the state were being dispatched to affected areas.
    The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
    dispatched more than 180 forestry workers, 21 law enforcement
    officers and an animal industry team to assist in Mississippi and
    South Florida areas affected by the storm.
    Chester Gunn, 68, of Brandon, was among the Baptist volunteers
    heading for Hattiesburg to help operate the shower trailer.
    "We get more out of it than the people we serve," said the
    retired power plant worker, who had spent two months doing
    hurricane relief last year. "To see people standing in front of
    you with tears running down their eyes and saying `thank you,'
    that's something money can't buy."
    Ivan Briggs, 68, a retired computer analyst and Kennedy Space
    Center tour bus driver from Titusville, responds good naturedly to
    kidding about sharing his first name with one of last year's
    hurricanes. He will be helping prepare food in Hattiesburg, just as
    he did after Hurricane Charley in Punta Gorda last year.
    "We had people from all over - Georgia, Mississippi and the
    Carolinas," Briggs said. "It's an opportunity to return what
    they've done."

    (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  5. #105
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Default

    By ANNIE BERGMAN
    Associated Press Writer
    LITTLE ROCK (AP) - Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee said Tuesday that
    the unprecedented devastation of Hurricane Katrina demanded an
    "unparalleled level of response" from the state where many
    refugees fled in advance of the storm and might stay indefinitely
    while waiting to return.
    "If there's ever a time when the Golden Rule applies, it's
    now," Huckabee said at a dinner hosted for refugees at the
    Arkansas State Fair Grounds.
    Refugees from Louisiana and Mississippi poured into Arkansas
    before Katrina hit the Gulf Coast on Monday morning. Many had
    anticipated returning to their homes soon, but damage was so severe
    and conditions still so dangerous that all timetables are shot.
    "We don't see us back home for a while," said Donnita Baranyai
    of Kenner, La., whose extended family of 20 - staying in North
    Little Rock - hoped to return home Wednesday. "We talked to a
    neighbor who said the water is to the roof."
    She said family resources are running low and that everyone she
    knows who traveled to Arkansas to flee the storm is running short
    on cash.
    Refugees who traveled to the Hillsboro Inn in El Dorado saw a
    familiar name on arrival. The front desk clerk's name is Katrina.
    Few were amused, hotel manager Guy Williams said.
    Erica Preatto of Marrero, La., staying at a shelter on the
    Arkansas State Fair Grounds in Little Rock, said it appears she,
    her 11-month-old daughter and the baby's father would be in
    Arkansas for an unknown time.
    "We don't know if we're going to be here for a couple days or a
    couple months," said Preatto, who is seven months' pregnant. "I'm
    hoping I don't have to have my baby in Arkansas. I'm afraid we're
    going to have to have a birthday party in Arkansas" for the
    daughter on Sept. 7.
    "It would be nice if we could find a way to make a living while
    we're here," Preatto said. "We don't know anybody and we don't
    know what to do."
    Huckabee, who went to the fair grounds to meet 50 or so refugees
    at a dinner that featured hamburgers and garlic chicken, said the
    operation to help displaced residents of Louisiana and Mississippi
    was without precedent.
    "The number of people who will have to relocate, the length of
    people who will have to stay away, it necessitates an unparalleled
    level of response," he said. Huckabee said Arkansas could leave
    shelters open for weeks or maybe months.
    Separately, the Arkansas National Guard sent an advance team to
    Camp Shelby, Miss., which will serve as a staging area for
    assistance in southern Mississippi. With 350 Guardsmen, Arkansas is
    also sending a pair of Medevac Black Hawk helicopters to the
    region. Fifteen guardsmen also departed Hazen on Tuesday to rescue
    patients stranded at the VA Medical Center in New Orleans.
    "I wish them the best as they head to a region destroyed by one
    of the worst natural disasters in our recent history," Rep. Marion
    Berry, D-Ark., said.
    Entergy Arkansas, the state's largest electric utility, sent 362
    workers to help its sister utilities in Louisiana and Mississippi,
    including 205 linemen and service people. The Electric Cooperatives
    of Arkansas sent 100 linemen to Louisiana, 28 to Alabama and 13 to
    Mississippi.
    State Forester John T. Shannon said the Arkansas Forestry
    Commission sent 14 people to Louisiana to assist with cleanup
    efforts. Some will work with chain saws to clear roads and remove
    debris from along power lines.
    The Arkansas Civil Air Patrol offered expertise in aerial
    photography and damage assessment and would use a satellite uplink
    to send real-time photographs to emergency management officials.
    Members are also trained in search-and-rescue missions and
    emergency communications.
    Huckabee asked Arkansans to donate to the American Red Cross'
    disaster relief fund and asked state police to deploy more troopers
    in southern Arkansas to aid refugees from farther south.
    Several Arkansas communities offered shelter to refugees,
    including the Summit Arena in Hot Springs, which was feeding people
    in addition to housing them. Monday, Huckabee said shelters would
    be opened throughout Arkansas' southern tier of counties.
    Arkadelphia hosted a free lunch for refugees on Tuesday at the
    city Recreation Center. Todd Turner is an attorney who helped
    distribute the invitations.
    "These people are desperate. They asked us questions. They
    didn't know where the hospital was. You can imagine if you were
    stuck there for a week," Turner said.
    "A lot of them were really excited" when given the invitations
    to the lunch, Turner said. "A group at the Holiday Inn started
    crying."
    The city also opened its swimming pool early to accommodate
    travelers.
    The Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism has posted a list
    of available lodging for Hurricane Katrina victims on its
    www.Arkansas.com Web site. Most of the listings are hotels and
    motels with vacancies, though churches and other shelters are
    included.

    (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  6. #106
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Default

    By ADAM NOSSITER
    Associated Press Writer
    NEW ORLEANS (AP) - Helicopters dropped sandbags on two broken
    levees as the water kept rising in the streets. The governor drew
    up plans to evacuate just about everyone left in town. Looters
    ransacked stores. Doctors in their scrubs had to use canoes to
    bring supplies to blacked-out hospitals.
    New Orleans sank deeper into crisis Tuesday, a full day after
    Hurricane Katrina hit.
    "It's downtown Baghdad," said tourist Denise Bollinger, who
    snapped pictures of looting in the French Quarter. "It's insane."
    The mayor estimated that 80 percent of New Orleans was flooded,
    while a countless number of residents were still stranded on
    rooftops.
    Hospitals were running out of power and scrambling to find
    places to take their patients. At one clinic, broken glass littered
    some areas and patients and staff had fallen on floors slick with
    floodwaters.
    Gov. Kathleen Blanco said that everyone still in the city, now
    huddled in the Superdome and other rescue centers, needs to leave.
    She said late Tuesday she wanted the Superdome - with no
    electricity or air conditioning - to be evacuated within two days.
    The Federal Emergency Management Agency is considering putting
    people on cruise ships, in tent cities, mobile home parks, and
    so-called floating dormitories - boats the agency uses to house its
    own employees.
    Rescue teams were still picking up people throughout the city
    Tuesday, leaving them on island-like highway overpasses and on a
    levee to wait to be moved again. Eventually, they will end up in
    the Superdome, where 15,000 to 20,000 people have taken refuge,
    said Louisiana National Guard Maj. Gen. Bennett C. Landreneau. One
    person died at the Superdome attempting to jump from one level to a
    lower one.
    Among the evacuees are 5,000 inmates from New Orleans and
    suburbs that need to be moved. Officials were trying to figure out
    how.
    The historic French Quarter appeared to have been spared the
    worst flooding, but its stores were getting the worst of human
    nature.
    "The looting is out of control. The French Quarter has been
    attacked," Councilwoman Jackie Clarkson said. "We're using
    exhausted, scarce police to control looting when they should be
    used for search and rescue while we still have people on
    rooftops."
    As Sen. Mary Landrieu flew over the area by helicopter, a group
    of people smashed a window at a convenience store and jumped in.
    At a drug store in the French Quarter, people were running out
    with grocery baskets and coolers full of soft drinks, chips and
    diapers. One looter shot and wounded a fellow looter, who was taken
    to a hospital and survived.
    Only rooftops were visible in several neighborhoods and the
    occasional building was in flames.
    On a grassy hill in the Carrolton neighborhood, a group of
    people watched the water quickly rising in the street, about a foot
    an hour by some estimates.
    William Washington had gone to bed in dry house Monday night,
    well after the hurricane had passed. The water came up Tuesday
    after the levee broke, and by afternoon his home was flooded.
    "We're trying to get to the Superdome," Washington said as he
    waited with neighbors. "We're waiting for the National Guard. The
    radio mentioned that they would pick people up."
    With hundreds, if not thousands, of people still stranded in
    flooded homes, attics and rooftops across the city, rescue boats
    were bypassing the dead to reach the living, Mayor C. Ray Nagin
    said.
    "We're not even dealing with dead bodies," Nagin said.
    "They're just pushing them on the side."
    A few more feet of water could wipe out the entire city water
    system, said Terry Ebbert, the city's homeland security chief.
    The intestates are impassable, the bridges may be unstable and
    no one knows if the buildings can withstand the damage brought by
    Katrina, the governor said after flying over the region.
    "We saw block after block, neighborhood and neighborhood
    inundated," Blanco said, her voice breaking with emotion. "It's
    just heartbreaking."
    Sean Jeffries of New Orleans had already been evacuated from one
    French Quarter hotel when he was ordered out of a second hotel
    Tuesday because of rising water.
    The 37-year-old banker - who admitted to looting some food from
    a nearby supermarket - said the hotel guests were told they were
    being taken to a convention center, but from there, they didn't
    know.
    "We're in the middle of a national tragedy," he said as he
    popped purloined grapes in his mouth. "But I know this city. We
    will be back. It may take awhile. But we will be back."

    (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  7. #107
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Flanders, NJ
    Posts
    13,537

    Default

    "To be honest with you, people who are oppressed all their lives, man, it's an opportunity to get back at society," he said.
    Their definition of "oppressed" means that they have not been handed everything they want on a silver platter.

    I can remember on 9/11 walking through downtown Manhattan. Doors to stores were wide open and not a thing was missing. Too many more days of watching the looting on TV and their is going to be very little sympathy from the rest of the US. These animals are not exactly going to be welcomed with open arms in other areas of the country.

    On the insurance note, this is going to be a big story in a few weeks. If you look at your homeowners insurance policy, flood is a specifically excluded risk. That means if the damage is caused by a flood, the insurance company is not obligated to pay you. That is why they sell flood insurance. You may see that a whole ton of these claims are not going to be covered.

  8. #108
    MembersZone Subscriber
    dmleblanc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Not the end of the earth but I can see it from here...
    Posts
    2,318

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeWendtCFI
    Too many more days of watching the looting on TV and their is going to be very little sympathy from the rest of the US.
    I couldn't have put it better myself...
    Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
    Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
    Paincourtville, LA

    "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream and I hope you don't find this too crazy is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
    C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

  9. #109
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Westlake, Ohio
    Posts
    451

    Default

    This is just so incredibly sad to see these people who have worked so hard and lost nearly everything. I know they're grateful to be alive, but their hearts must be broken. I wish there were some way to help them directly, but for now, I guess sending money is all we can do.

  10. #110
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    New Mexico, U.S.A.
    Posts
    181

    Arrow Best wishes.

    New Mexico Task Force 1 headed out yesterday to help. Stay safe guys, come home soon.

    To all those victims of Katrina we're thinking of you.
    09.11.01--Never Forgotten
    FTM_PTB

    "Darn those pesky flaming mice."

  11. #111
    MembersZone Subscriber
    MalahatTwo7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Loco madidus effercio in rutilus effercio.
    Posts
    12,837

    Default

    GOOD LUCK GUYS. I hope the best for everyone involved in the 'clean up'.

    Medics resort to alternate vehiclesBy Matthew Cella THE WASHINGTON TIMES August 31, 2005

    Paramedics in the District are using sport utility vehicles and Ford Crown Victorias to respond to medical emergencies because of a shortage of ambulances in the city's fleet.

    Crews had to resort to the alternate vehicles during the weekend on discovering that reserve ambulances already had been pressed into service to replace units under repair.

    Fire officials conceded there was a shortage Sunday that forced one crew to respond to an emergency in a nontransport vehicle.

    Alan Etter, a spokesman for the fire department, said the incident was caused by a high volume of heat-related medical calls. He said the department has three or four ambulances left on reserve.

    "It's one of those situations when they get down a little closer than they would like it to be," he said.

    But paramedics working during the weekend told a different story. "Supervisors tried every which way to keep the paramedics on duty," one medic said.

    Some emergency response departments, including the District's, employ specialized nontransport vehicles, commonly referred to as "fly cars" or "rapid response vehicles," that are supplied with medical equipment.

    The vehicles allow paramedics to administer advanced life support and move on to the next call while emergency medical technicians transport and wait with the patient at the hospital.

    The District has two such units -- SUVs marked with symbols identifying them as rapid-response vehicles. The vehicles pressed into service this past weekend were department-owned Crown Victorias usually driven by supervisors.

    "This is absurd," said Kenneth Lyons, president of the American Federation of Government Employees Local 3721, which represents the city's paramedics and emergency medical technicians. "We are at a tipping point here when it comes to something as easily purchasable as an ambulance."

    A source said there has been a rash of accidents in the past few months and that the department is attempting to make an emergency purchase of additional ambulances.

    Mr. Etter confirmed that fire officials were looking at new ambulances Monday and plan to buy more units "very shortly."

    On any given day, the department operates 51 ambulances. However, the numbers fluctuate as ambulances break down or require routine maintenance.

    Of the 51 units, 33 respond to 911 calls and transport patients to hospitals.

    Twelve ambulances are part of the emergency mobilization plan, from which the department deploys units to special events, such as Washington Nationals home games.

    Four ambulances are held in reserve in case a front-line ambulance breaks down. Two ambulances are used by supervisors to train medics.

    Mr. Lyons blamed the shortage on "mismanagement." "We warned them a long time ago we were getting to this point," he said. "Now we're managing by crisis."


    As for the looters.... as a member of a foreign delegation, I am not permitted to express my views on that situation, but if I were a redneck (and no disrespect intended) I know what I'd be doing.
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

  12. #112
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Diane E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Location
    Maryland (but always a Long Islander first)
    Posts
    1,103

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeWendtCFI
    On the insurance note, this is going to be a big story in a few weeks. If you look at your homeowners insurance policy, flood is a specifically excluded risk. That means if the damage is caused by a flood, the insurance company is not obligated to pay you. That is why they sell flood insurance. You may see that a whole ton of these claims are not going to be covered.
    There's also hurricane coverage (at least on Long Island there is)...Some have high deductibles depending on how close you are to water.
    "When I was young, my ambition was to be one of the people who made a difference in this world. My hope is to leave the world a little better for my having been there."
    -- Jim Henson (1936 - 1990)

  13. #113
    Forum Member
    KnightnPBIArmor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Beautiful downtown Hortense, GA
    Posts
    745

    Angry

    Did anyone besides me see the clip on the news this morning that showed 2 female NOPD officers IN UNIFORM joining in the looting??? We at the station couldn't believe what we were seeing, and when the reporter asked the one what she was doing, all she could come up with was "I'm doing my job"

  14. #114
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Flanders, NJ
    Posts
    13,537

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KnightnPBIArmor
    Did anyone besides me see the clip on the news this morning that showed 2 female NOPD officers IN UNIFORM joining in the looting??? We at the station couldn't believe what we were seeing, and when the reporter asked the one what she was doing, all she could come up with was "I'm doing my job"
    As usual, gang up on the cops.

    I highly doubt that they were "participating in the looting". I read press accounts of police securing pharmaceutical products to be transferred to hospitals, etc. There was video footage of that taking place on Fox. The stuff is going to be ruined anyway. It is a smart move to get these items to people who can use them. I am sure that is what she meant by "doing her job".

  15. #115
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Memphis Tn,USA-now
    Posts
    5,436

    Default

    I agree with y'all.They should have pictures of those caught on tape looting at the relief offices and turn them away as they have already"helped themselves".
    Just because you need food and the relief effort hasn't started yet doesn't mean that you can go to Wally World and loot you a new TV set.

    On a related note,I am reading a book called "Rising Tide"about the flood of 1927 and the levees in St Bernard and Plaqueminne Parishes that were dynamited to ease the pressure on the levees around New Orleans are the same ones that failed and flooded out again.

    Quote Originally Posted by dmleblanc
    I couldn't have put it better myself...

  16. #116
    Forum Member
    KnightnPBIArmor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Beautiful downtown Hortense, GA
    Posts
    745

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeWendtCFI
    As usual, gang up on the cops.

    I highly doubt that they were "participating in the looting". I read press accounts of police securing pharmaceutical products to be transferred to hospitals, etc. There was video footage of that taking place on Fox. The stuff is going to be ruined anyway. It is a smart move to get these items to people who can use them. I am sure that is what she meant by "doing her job".
    George, George, George...relax: I was a reserve police officer myself for 2 years, and I have worked as a fire investigator, so I don't think I'm "ganging up on the cops". All I know is the video clip showed two female officers loading a buggy with clothes, while civilian looters carried off whatever they could get their hands on. Get items to people who could use them? I could see food and water, but I would say clothes would be a secondary neccesity, wouldn't you?

  17. #117
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    New Sharon, Ia
    Posts
    47

    Default

    The most important thing is what can we do to help and how can we respond, I have several firefigthers and emt's wanting to help, we can leave Iowa at a moments notice. If you know who to contact let us know, we will be in route. Email me if you can.

  18. #118
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Flanders, NJ
    Posts
    13,537

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KnightnPBIArmor
    George, George, George...relax: I was a reserve police officer myself for 2 years, and I have worked as a fire investigator, so I don't think I'm "ganging up on the cops". All I know is the video clip showed two female officers loading a buggy with clothes, while civilian looters carried off whatever they could get their hands on. Get items to people who could use them? I could see food and water, but I would say clothes would be a secondary neccesity, wouldn't you?
    Nope.

    Being in wet clothes for 48-72 hours is a health hazard. They showed people who had been w/o shoes who had been walking for days with the feet cut up and bleeding.

    Seems to me they were doing their job.

  19. #119
    MembersZone Subscriber
    krg1401's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    78

    Default Help

    dmleblanc - we have an employee in our department who has family in Pasq and Moss Point. Pasq has been in the news but nothing from Moss Point. Any info would be grealty appreciated!

  20. #120
    Forum Member
    MIKEYLIKESIT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Division 24
    Posts
    4,360

    Default A local reports in.

    I just got a call from a friend who rode out the storm in Metairie, which is located about halfway betweeh the airport and downtown. He is staying at a friends house.The friend evacuated. My buddy has a generator, a pool, food and a ton of booze at his disposal. He also has access to regular phone. He says every half mile east of him it gets worse. He says there is significant damage, mostly to trees and power lines but no flooding. If you are familiar with N.O., he is located at I-10 and the Causeway. He and several other people are keeping an eye on the neighborhood. They are siphoning gas from the neighbors vehicles for the generator....With the neighbors blessings. The A.C is oos but hes living pretty well. Oh yeah one other thing....They are armed and prepared to keep any passing thugs moving along. I feel a tiny bit better that he was ok. I told him he was a dumbass for staying , but he is a Coast Guard veteran and I was fairly sure he would be alright.
    IAFF-IACOJ PROUD

  21. #121
    MembersZone Subscriber
    EFD840's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Eclectic (no, NOT electric), Alabama
    Posts
    1,510

    Default

    Folks have been asking how to help...

    These people are going to need help for a long, long time after the rescue and recovery operation is over. The survivors not only saw their homes and possessions destroyed, their jobs and the local tax base washed away too.

    Here's a link directly to the American Red Cross online donation page. You can also call 1-800-HELP-NOW. I just made a donation and I'm challenging everyone here to make one too.

    This looks and sounds more and more like the Galveston hurricane . I really hope the death toll doesn't approach that storm but you've got to wonder what's going to be under all that water and debris.

    One more thought. Anybody remember Cellblock? Wasn't he a FF/EMT just outside New Orleans?

  22. #122
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    60

    Default

    Does anyone know who to contact to get down there to help either as a dept or a small crew of guys? as volunteers? or just sit and wait for a call?

  23. #123
    Forum Member
    DeputyMarshal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    2,638

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nnjfire
    Does anyone know who to contact to get down there to help either as a dept or a small crew of guys? as volunteers? or just sit and wait for a call?
    Everything you need to know can be found at the American Red Cross website.
    Last edited by DeputyMarshal; 08-31-2005 at 01:34 PM.
    "Nemo Plus Voluptatis Quam Nos Habant"

    The Code is more what you'd call "guidelines" than actual rules.

  24. #124
    Forum Member
    MEck51's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    444

    Default

    Sit and wait, if they need help it will work it's way down. There are scores of fema and USAR teams on the way, plenty of military as well - as if they don't do enough for this country. Disaese is going to be rampant, sad as it is to say, structures will be heavily damaged. This is an area for experts with proper equipment. No cowboys need apply.

  25. #125
    Forum Member
    KnightnPBIArmor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Beautiful downtown Hortense, GA
    Posts
    745

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeWendtCFI
    Nope.

    Being in wet clothes for 48-72 hours is a health hazard. They showed people who had been w/o shoes who had been walking for days with the feet cut up and bleeding.

    Seems to me they were doing their job.
    *sigh* ok George, you win...if you say they were doing their job, then so be it; it's not worth fighting about. My only parting comment would be to re-emphasize that I was not bashing cops in general, just two in particular who appeared to be engaged in mutt-like behavior.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 5 of 12 First ... 2345678 ... Last

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register