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  1. #1
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    Default how should a Engine be equipped to be considered a Squad

    how should a Engine be equipped to be considered a Squad


  2. #2
    Forum Member Res343cue's Avatar
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    can't answer that without knowing what an "Engine" in your area carries, and what a "Squad" in your area carries. I'm thinking you mean something like a FDNY "Squad", which around here is known as a "rescue engine".

    A typical "rescue engine" around these parts usually carries a basic set of hydraulic tools (Dual pump, one or two rams, a cutter, and spreader.), a few airbags, step chocks, and a minor compliment of cribbing until a heavy-rescue can arrive on scene.

    On the "truck" side of things, usually a K-12 or similar saw, a chainsaw, positive pressure fan, a smoke ejector, TIC, a minimal rope-rescue setup (Most likely low angle).

    On the "engine" side of things, the apparatus is setup to be self sufficient. This usually includes a drop tank, 2 or 4 lenghts of 6" hard suction, 2 lenghts of 3" hard suction, numerous strainers, adapters to go from 1" to 6" and then back. Lots of hose! 1000 feet of LDH, 600-800 feet of 1.75" line, 500 feet of 2.5" attack line, sometimes a bed of 3" supply line also.

    Can't forget to mention that we also have atleast a 10# sledge, a 20# sledge, various sized pike poles / hooks, two or three sets of irons, two pickhead axes, and a bunch of other handtools such as shovels, brooms, and rakes. To help save space, the tools such as the shovesl/brooms share handles, and we'll carry a few handles, and have some extra attachments for them. Can't forget to mention the tool-box. There's too much to really list all at once without taking out an apparatus checklist. Generator, lots of cord, portable lights, it's all there.

    Possibly check out some of the FD websites that have "Rescue Engines" or "Rescue Pumpers". I think some of the FDNY "Squads" have clickable-pictures so you can see what they carry. Look at the needs of what a "Squad" would need to do in your area, and then you'll know what needs to be on it.
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  3. #3
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    Around here, pretty much all of the large engines are set up as you describe, and a squad is usually a pickup truck with a service body, or something of that nature, sometimes used interchangeably with "rescue" which also might denote some type of ambulance so who knows.

    Birken

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    MembersZone Subscriber rualfire's Avatar
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    I agree with Res343cue.

    A rig outfitted such as he described will be able to handle 90% of rescue and Fire calls. Maybe even 95% or more. For the other or 10% of the time, you'll want the heavy rescue and will call secondary engines and ladders (trucks) for working fires anyways.

    Except for the hose load ( We've got a grand total of 2 hydrants in our response district ) This pretty much describes our inventory.
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    Forum Member Res343cue's Avatar
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    Around here, pretty much all of the large engines are set up as you describe, and a squad is usually a pickup truck with a service body, or something of that nature, sometimes used interchangeably with "rescue" which also might denote some type of ambulance so who knows.

    Birken
    Our two frontline engines are setup like that, as well as the neighboring towns and citys frontline pieces. In the small town areas, it's quite common to have "rescue pumpers" as a frontline unit. Ours just also happen to have 50 gallons of foam (25/25) and 1250 galons of water carried.

    Quote Originally Posted by rualfire
    Except for the hose load ( We've got a grand total of 2 hydrants in our response district ) This pretty much describes our inventory.
    We have 0 hydrants that are usuable in our area, other then our dry hydrants. LDH and supply hose is so we can relay pump to the scene. On our four pumpers, we carry a total of around 1.5 miles of LDH. If we call for mutual aide, we can have access to atleast double that, as well as two miles of 5" if we absolutely need it.
    Quote Originally Posted by ThNozzleMan
    Why? Because we are firemen. We are decent human beings. We would be compelled by the overwhelming impulse to save an innocent child from a tragic, painful death because in the end, we are MEN.

    I A C O J
    FTM-PTB


    Honorary Disclaimer: While I am a manufacturer representative, I am not here to sell my product. Any advice or knowledge shared is for informational purposes only. I do not use Firehouse.Com for promotional purposes.

  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber rualfire's Avatar
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    1.5 Miles of LDH.... Yucko... The poor buggar who gets to reload that after an all nighter..

    We cover a little better than 360 square miles with a density of about 3 residential / agricultural home sites per square mile. Typically, we would have a home and a shop or barn at each homesite. Water is pretty scarce. There is irrigation in most of the county, but many of the structures are well past 4 miles from a canal. The standing water is frozen over in the winter, and there are no dry hydrants in our region.

    So... We take 6100 gallons of water in 3 tankers (tenders) with us to a structure fire and start a shuttle. (1600, 1200 and 3300 gallon). We also have access to comercial water haulers with large tandem tenders. They are slow to respond, so we get them rolling soon after we have a confirmed working fire. assuming a 300 GPM flow, we can sustain operations for 20 minutes. before the first shuttle needs to be back on scene. If the structure isn't saved in 20 minutes, we are likely not going to save it.

    Luckily, structure fires are few and far between (5 or 6 per year). We fill most of our days with MVA rescue calls and Grass fires.
    SRFD905 - Serving since 1998

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  7. #7
    Forum Member Dave1983's Avatar
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    All depends on your area. Here we have a county SOG on apparatus types. An engine must have at least 1000' of 5" LDH, a 500 tank and a 1250GPM pump, along with standard engine company equipment (attack lines are considered standard). A squad must have, as a minimum, a full set of extrication equipment, a large generator, mast mounted and portable scene lighting, PPV and SCBA refill capabilities. There are a couple engines in my area that fit this.
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