1. #1
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    Default Mold in the Fire Station

    For many years, we knew we had a mold problem in one of our fire stations. Finally, after one of the firefighters came down with a respiratory illness and others fell victim to staph infections, it has started to grasp the concern of management. The infections have only been at the station with the mold problem. A mold remidiator came ot check the place, came in the front door, curesed, told the firefighter he didin't need to look any further, and left. Vowing to return with the rest of his equipment. The firefighters are still living in the station. After an internet search, it seems that many fire stations have this problem, but the other common factor is that once mold is found, the firefighters are removed from the station.

    We have been advised of 3 different types of mold and we were told it's really bad. Well duh, we knew this for years, but it took an illness (a severe illness) to wake up management. We have also been advised by the city that it's OK for us to still live in this station, we should be ok (!?!!?)

    I would like to hear if any others have experienced mold problems in your stations and what was done about it. After much reading, I'm not convinced that these guys should be living in the station. Before the subject comes up - yes, we have a union but it is not recognized by the city. What we are able to do is hire lawyers, but that's about all. Any information would be appreciated.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiredoldman
    For many years, we knew we had a mold problem in one of our fire stations. Finally, after one of the firefighters came down with a respiratory illness and others fell victim to staph infections, it has started to grasp the concern of management. The infections have only been at the station with the mold problem. A mold remidiator came ot check the place, came in the front door, curesed, told the firefighter he didin't need to look any further, and left. Vowing to return with the rest of his equipment. The firefighters are still living in the station. After an internet search, it seems that many fire stations have this problem, but the other common factor is that once mold is found, the firefighters are removed from the station.

    We have been advised of 3 different types of mold and we were told it's really bad. Well duh, we knew this for years, but it took an illness (a severe illness) to wake up management. We have also been advised by the city that it's OK for us to still live in this station, we should be ok (!?!!?)

    I would like to hear if any others have experienced mold problems in your stations and what was done about it. After much reading, I'm not convinced that these guys should be living in the station. Before the subject comes up - yes, we have a union but it is not recognized by the city. What we are able to do is hire lawyers, but that's about all. Any information would be appreciated.
    OSHA or your state equivalent.

    Media

    BTW, mold remediation can take a considerably long time.

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    Default

    Our state version of OSHA has not been to the station yet, although we have contacted them. Media doesn't care - at least the local ones don't(a long story). I'm trying to find what other departments have done when they find mold as far as keeping the firefighters living in the station. Most everyplace I have read about takes them out and puts them in another station, or brings in a double wide trailer for them to live in.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiredoldman
    Our state version of OSHA has not been to the station yet, although we have contacted them. Media doesn't care - at least the local ones don't(a long story). I'm trying to find what other departments have done when they find mold as far as keeping the firefighters living in the station. Most everyplace I have read about takes them out and puts them in another station, or brings in a double wide trailer for them to live in.
    Have you guys tried to remedy this yourself? Dehumidifiers work wonders. As long as you can get the mold to dry up you should be able to take care of it. At least, at minimum identify the cause, then maybe you can come up with a solution on your own, or what a "specialist" may suggest. IMO, take care of this yourself, send the bill to the city, and contact your version of OSHA. It will get taken care of.
    FF/NREMT-B

    FTM-PTB!!

    Brass does not equal brains.

    Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the ability to control it.

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    Default

    We had a mold problem in one of our stations, primarily in the bunk room. The city's solution was to move the bunk room to the TV room and wait. We had 5 cases of Bell's Palsy in firefighters assigned to this station. Our Local had someone come in to test all the stations and this one had levels through the roof. Eventually the station was shut down, gutted and renovated but it took a while.
    "I have no ambition in this world but one, and that is to be a fireman. The position may, in the eyes of some, appear to be a lowly one; but we know the work which a fireman has to do believe that his is a noble calling."

    Edward F. Croker
    Chief 1899-1911
    Fire Dept. City of New York

    HOOK N' CAN of the I.A.C.O.J.

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    Red face mold

    We have had a couple of stations here with mold. Like you, people got sick but the union stepped in and the city cooperated. The effected areas were taped off with plastic sheet until a removal an decon crew could come in and remove the stuff and or replace the materials. A few precautionary steps like the dehumidifiers and plenty of spray and all is okay.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pfd4life
    Have you guys tried to remedy this yourself? Dehumidifiers work wonders. As long as you can get the mold to dry up you should be able to take care of it. At least, at minimum identify the cause, then maybe you can come up with a solution on your own, or what a "specialist" may suggest. IMO, take care of this yourself, send the bill to the city, and contact your version of OSHA. It will get taken care of.
    There are certain types of mold that cannot be self-remediated.

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