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  1. #61
    MembersZone Subscriber ameryfd's Avatar
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    Ok....I do believe this thread has now inspired me to the point where I will save alot of money and head to my local Walmart to shop in the dead horse department .....

    PS...is that deptmartment next to the toy dept or the grocery's?


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    George:
    I know you weren't bashing them.
    "You" wasn't you.
    "You" was "them"!
    We DO shop at Wal-Mart.
    Consider it my efforts towards balance of trade.
    Even the Jerry Lewis Telethon for Muscular Dystrophy donated a million dollars to Hurricane Katrina relief.
    Oh; and I have been told by the Illinois departments sending people at the request of FEMA that it is the Wal-Mart stores that are opening up for them, so they can eat and use the restrooms.
    Such spirit in the wake of Katrina.
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  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by ameryfd
    Ok....I do believe this thread has now inspired me to the point where I will save alot of money and head to my local Walmart to shop in the dead horse department .....

    PS...is that deptmartment next to the toy dept or the grocery's?
    Neither.
    Look in the hardware section...
    for GLUE.
    CR
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  4. #64
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    HERE IS A STORY from CNN about aid from other countries.......



    Offers of aid from around the world

    Monday, September 5, 2005; Posted: 7:30 p.m. EDT (23:30 GMT)




    (CNN) -- Countries and international agencies -- including several coping with major adversities themselves -- have offered money and supplies to victims of Hurricane Katrina.

    Allies such as Britain and Germany as well as adversaries such as Cuba and Iran say they are willing to provide resources and manpower to help with the recovery.

    War-wracked Afghanistan and countries slammed by the December tsunami such as India, Thailand and Sri Lanka also offered help.

    In addition, the United Nations, the European Union, the Organization of American States and the International Energy Agency are contributing to the relief effort.

    However, Cuban President Fidel Castro said the United States had not responded to his offer to send more than 1,500 doctors and tons of medicine and supplies as of Sunday night.

    Speaking to doctors in Havana, Castro said: "You could all be there right now lending your services, but 48 hours has passed since we made this offer, and we have received absolutely no response."

    Castro recently refused a U.S. offer of help after Hurricane Dennis killed more than 10 people on the island nation in July.

    Here are some of the offers:

    International agencies:

    A U.N. offer of help has been accepted by the United States, the United Nations said. A U.N. coordination team is consulting with government officials in Washington, and the agency's team "will be based at the newly established USAID Hurricane Katrina Operations Center."


    The International Energy Agency on Friday announced that all of its 26 member countries agreed to make available 60 million barrels of oil and gas products over the next month.


    The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies said "more than 80 disaster experts from the Red Cross societies of more than 10 countries are already in place or making plans to travel to the United States in response to a call from the American Red Cross."


    NATO said it has been asked by the United States to send emergency relief supplies -- including first aid kits, blankets and food supplies. A NATO liaison officer has been sent to the United States to coordinate aid requests and work with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, according to a NATO statement.


    The European Union has offered to help the United States with any assistance required.


    The Organization of American States, comprised of Latin American countries, has ordered special measures to back rescue and relief efforts and to restore order, and is establishing a fund for Katrina victims.

    Africa

    Nigeria: Africa's most populous nation has pledged $1 million for disaster relief.

    Americas

    Canada was contacted by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services officials to request National Emergency Stockpile System supplies. Requested were "blankets, gloves, gowns, batteries, needles, surgical dressings, bandages, tongue depressors, and bath towels and cloths."


    Cuba: Fidel Castro, an adversary of the United States during his decades in power, has offered at least 26 tons of supplies and mobilized 1,586 doctors experienced in disaster assistance, each of whom would bring 27 pounds of medicine.


    Mexico has offered $1 million and is sending 15 truckloads of water, food and medical supplies via Texas. The Mexican navy has offered to send two ships, two helicopters and 15 amphibious vehicles.


    Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, a vocal critic of the United States, offered to send cheap fuel, humanitarian aid and relief workers to the disaster area.

    Asia

    Afghanistan, where U.S. troops have been battling Islamic militants in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, pledged a $100,000 donation.


    Bangladesh: Prime Minister Khaleda Zia announced a donation of $1 million and said the government "will stand by for extending any help and support which includes sending of military, medical and construction personnel.


    India: The government is offering $5 million to the American Red Cross and donations of essential medicines, water purification systems for household and community level operations, and a medical team.


    Japan has offered to provide $200,000 to the American Red Cross. It is ready to provide up to $300,000 worth of items such as tents, blankets, power generators, portable water tanks and more from a supply depot maintained by the Japanese government in Florida.


    Sri Lanka: The country still recovering from the tsunami offered what it called a "token contribution" of $25,000 through the American Red Cross.


    Thailand: The office of the prime minister confirmed Monday that the Thai government is offering 100 doctors and nurses to go to the United States next week to help with Hurricane Katrina relief efforts.

    Europe

    Britain: A plane carrying rations left Britain Monday morning. Britain has said that other kinds of assistance it might be able to offer "are those which focus on areas of specialist and technical expertise, such as medical, urban search and rescue, water management, oil and gas, utilities (water, electricity), port handling, disaster management and emergency response."


    France: It has offered a wide range of supplies and services from its mainland and the French Antilles, relatively close to the affected regions. One French non-governmental organization that specializes in restoring phone lines and Internet service is ready to send a team. Veolia Equipment, which has facilities in Louisiana, has offered to make its water management resources available.


    Germany: The government has offered a wide range of assistance, including evacuation by air, medical services, transportation services, water treatment capabilities, assistance in searching for victims, vaccination teams and supplies, and emergency shelter.


    Italy: A plane carrying aid left Rome Sunday night headed toward the United States.


    Spain: A six-member Spanish Red Cross delegation is traveling to the United States to assess the needs of hurricane victims and coordinate with the American Red Cross on what Spain can provide in coming days and weeks.


    Sweden: Rescue Authority said it was on standby to supply water purifying equipment, health care supplies and emergency shelters if needed.

    Middle East

    Bahrain: $5 million donation to assist with relief.


    Iran: Foreign Ministry spokesman Hamid Reza-Asefi said Sunday his country is willing to help, if "there is a need for such relief assistance." The aid would be given through the Red Crescent Society, he told reporters.


    Israel: Offers medical assistance, such as personnel, equipment and medicines.


    Kuwait: Government has asked parliament to approve an emergency aid package of $500 million in humanitarian aid and petroleum. "We as Kuwaitis feel that we must stand alongside our friends to alleviate this humanitarian hardship," Minister of Energy Sheikh Ahmad Al-Fahd said in a statement to the Kuwait News Agency.


    Qatar: Offers $100 million to assist in the humanitarian crisis triggered by Hurricane Katrina.

    Other nations that have offered help include Austria, Australia, Bahamas, Belgium, China, Colombia, Dominica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Greece, Guatemala, Guyana, Hungary, Jamaica, Lithuania, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Paraguay, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, United Arab Emirates and Venezuela, according to the U.S. State Department.
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  5. #65
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    "Mexico has offered $1 million and is sending 15 truckloads of water, food and medical supplies via Texas. The Mexican navy has offered to send two ships, two helicopters and 15 amphibious vehicles."

    Yeah, but I was always told not to drink the water in mexico, is it a trap?

    On a serious note. I find it astonishing that the middle eastern countries are donating so much when all you here about on the news is how much the middle eastern countries don't want our presence. (would the media lie??)

    "Kuwait: Government has asked parliament to approve an emergency aid package of $500 million in humanitarian aid and petroleum. "We as Kuwaitis feel that we must stand alongside our friends to alleviate this humanitarian hardship," Minister of Energy Sheikh Ahmad Al-Fahd said in a statement to the Kuwait News Agency.


    Qatar: Offers $100 million to assist in the humanitarian crisis triggered by Hurricane Katrina. "

    Grant it these are 2 allied countries, but these 2 small countries are realy stepping up. I realize we bailed out kuwait and they might see it as returning a favor, but who would think $500 mil.. Well anyway good job to those that help. And for the others, we'll see when it's your turn.

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    only thing i bought from walmart, a package of thick white boot socks...
    prices were cool on a lotta stuff....but not a walmart type of guy.


    www.schackdaddy.com

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    No this is astounding:
    Bangladesh: Prime Minister Khaleda Zia announced a donation of $1 million and said the government "will stand by for extending any help and support which includes sending of military, medical and construction personnel.

    Japan has offered to provide $200,000 to the American Red Cross. It is ready to provide up to $300,000 worth of items such as tents, blankets, power generators, portable water tanks and more from a supply depot maintained by the Japanese government in Florida.
    One of the poorest country in the world, Bangladesh. One of the richest countries in the world, Japan. This doesn't make sense.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeWendtCFI
    No this is astounding:


    One of the poorest country in the world, Bangladesh. One of the richest countries in the world, Japan. This doesn't make sense.
    Japan downplays view its pledged hurricane aid is small


    Tuesday, September 6, 2005 at 15:52 JST
    TOKYO — The Japanese government is ready to provide more aid for people affected by Hurricane Katrina in southern U.S. states if requested by the United States, Vice Foreign Minister Shotaro Yachi said Monday, dismissing the view that the amount pledged by Tokyo pales in comparison with other donors.

    "We will do our utmost" to help the hurricane victims if requested by the United States in the near future, Yachi said, dismissing criticism that the amount of aid worth $500,000 announced last week is smaller than those offered by other countries as well as Japan's private sector. "The aid package the Japanese government announced Friday did not mean we will not offer any more aid."


    ______________________________ ______________________________ _____
    Japan gov't, firms join relief effort for U.S. hurricane victims
    Saturday, September 3, 2005 at 06:53 JST
    TOKYO — The Japanese government will provide $200,000 in cash to the American Red Cross and offer up to $300,000 worth of tents, blankets and other supplies for victims of Hurricane Katrina, Chief Cabinet Secretary Hiroyuki Hosoda said Friday.

    Japanese automakers have also announced emergency aid packages, with Toyota Motor Corp pledging a total of $5 million to support activities of the Red Cross and the Friedkin Disaster Relief Fund. Nissan Motor Co said it and its employees will offer a total of $750,000 and 50 pickup trucks and sport utility vehicles for Red Cross workers. The Japanese Red Cross Society decided to provide $200,000 to its U.S. counterpart. (Kyodo News)


    though its is small compared to some others.
    Last edited by BFDNJFF; 09-06-2005 at 06:40 PM.
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  9. #69
    MembersZone Subscriber ChiefReason's Avatar
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    How quickly they forget!
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeWendtCFI
    Please don't get me wrong. I do not bash WalMart. I have been defending them from day one. Their relief contributions are up to over $23 million. My initial "sucks" comment was sarcastic. I am geniunely impressed by their response. I don't make it a habit to shop at WalMart, but I will try to patronize them a little more following this.
    You can add a couple of more million to that:

    http://forums.firehouse.com/showthread.php?t=73556


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    A couple of Walmart stories

    http://biz.yahoo.com/bizwk/050907/nf...b017.html?.v=1

    http://www.triggernews.com/ap/20050905/71e8-4326.html

    So far, Wal-Mart said that it has contributed $17 million to relief efforts, including $15 million to the Bush-Clinton Katrina Fund. The company also has donated about $3 million in merchandise, including more than 100 trailer loads to emergency relief organizations, services and shelters.


    The Walton Family Foundation has donated $8 million to the Bush-Clinton Katrina Fund and $7 million to relief organizations like the Salvation Army, America's Second Harvest and The Foundation for the Mid-South.

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    Default I'm guilty

    I don't like admitting sometimes, when I haven't been nice. I'm a nice guy, but I do get on my soapbox sometimes. Okay, I'm saying that I haven't been a big supporter of Wal-Mart. It doesn't matter why. I'm sure I thought I had reasons. I'm also guilty of calling them by a slang term I learned from others (didn't start it, just borrowed it). Okay, I'm waving their flag now. Not only did they have some damaged properties, and secondary damage from looting....they opened where they could, to get things going locally as some stories reported. Dadburnit (borrowed that from Hoss), I'm chokin' up. I'm going to aisle four for tissues!

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    [QUOTE=GeorgeWendtCFI][QUOTE=FTMPTB15]
    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeWendtCFI
    Sooooo.....

    We should prohibit all Web Shopping sites because they offer goods at low prices and can drive mom and pop out of business? We should dismantle Home Depot. Lowe's Petco, Staples, KMart and all the other superstores because they offer low prices? Get real. It's basic economics.

    Damn. You caught me. After I started this thread yesterday, WalMart stock went up 30-40 points just because of this thread. It's true! Neil Cavuto said so!

    Please.

    BTW, I own 0 shares.
    That's right....all your stock is tied up in oil!

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    [QUOTE=parafire81][QUOTE=GeorgeWendtCFI]
    Quote Originally Posted by FTMPTB15

    That's right....all your stock is tied up in oil!
    You want to explain this? It makes no sense.

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    [QUOTE=GeorgeWendtCFI][QUOTE=parafire81]
    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeWendtCFI

    You want to explain this? It makes no sense.
    George:
    I think he just called you "independently wealthy"!
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    [QUOTE=GeorgeWendtCFI][QUOTE=parafire81]
    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeWendtCFI

    You want to explain this? It makes no sense.
    I believe that was intended as a juvenile insult in the vein that since you have spoken positively about President Bush, that you must be one of his "cronies" and have stock in oil...I believe that is addressed in Chapter 3 of "Political Dissent For Kids" by Michael Moore and Kanye West

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    [QUOTE=KnightnPBIArmor][QUOTE=GeorgeWendtCFI]
    Quote Originally Posted by parafire81

    I believe that was intended as a juvenile insult in the vein that since you have spoken positively about President Bush, that you must be one of his "cronies" and have stock in oil...I believe that is addressed in Chapter 3 of "Political Dissent For Kids" by Michael Moore and Kanye West
    I know. I just wanted to see if he had the testicular fortitude to admit it himself.

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    Just a little story for thought. From Las Vegas Weekly

    Two things struck me as odd - first hiring picketers and then having them shop in the very store they're picketing.

    ---------------------------------
    Picketers for Hire

    The strange business of protesting jobs that may be better than yours

    By Stacy J. Willis

    Wal-Mart picketers
    Photo by Iris Dumuk

    The shade from the Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market sign is minimal around noon; still, six picketers squeeze their thermoses and Dasani bottles onto the dirt below, trying to keep their water cool. They're walking five-hour shifts on this corner at Stephanie Street and American Pacific Drive in Henderson—anti-Wal-Mart signs propped lazily on their shoulders, deep suntans on their faces and arms—with two 15-minute breaks to run across the street and use the washroom at a gas station.

    Periodically one of them will sit down in a slightly larger slice of shade under a giant electricity pole in the intersection. Four lanes of traffic rush by, some drivers honk in support, more than once someone has yelled, "*******s!" but mostly, they're ignored.

    They're not union members; they're temp workers employed through Allied Forces/Labor Express by the union—United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW). They're making $6 an hour, with no benefits; it's 104 F, and they're protesting the working conditions inside the new Wal-Mart grocery store.

    "It don't make no sense, does it?" says James Greer, the line foreman and the only one who pulls down $8 an hour, as he ambles down the sidewalk, picket sign on shoulder, sweaty hat over sweaty gray hair, spitting sunflower seeds. "We're sacrificing for the people who work in there, and they don't even know it."

    The union accuses Wal-Mart of dragging down wages and working conditions for other grocery-store workers across the nation. "Whether you work or shop at Wal-Mart, the giant retailer's employment practices affect your wages. Wal-Mart leads the race to the bottom in wages and health-care," says the UFCW's website. "As the largest corporation in the world, Wal-Mart has a responsibility to the people who built it. Wal-Mart jobs offer low pay, inadequate and unaffordable healthcare, and off the clock work."

    But standing with a union-supplied sign on his shoulder that reads, Don't Shop WalMart: Below Area Standards, picketer and former Wal-Mart employee Sal Rivera says about the notorious working conditions of his former big-box employer: "I can't complain. It wasn't bad. They started paying me at $6.75, and after three months I was already getting $7, then I got Employee of the Month, and by the time I left (in less than one year), I was making $8.63 an hour." Rivera worked in maintenance and quit four years ago for personal reasons, he says. He would consider reapplying.

    Rivera is one of few picketers here who have ever worked for Wal-Mart—it's strictly coincidental that he was once in their employ. Most of the picketers were just looking for work through the temp agency.

    While Rivera's words for Wal-Mart seem less than harsh, he does add, "I did not want to get insurance from them because it was too expensive."

    That, says UCFW organizer Bill Hornbrook, who drove workers to the site one morning last week, is one of the reasons the union wants these protestors here.

    "Wal-Mart has no benefits at an affordable rate. The (Wal-Mart) workers can't afford the insurance with the wage they're making. We'd like to see them improve their working conditions," Hornbrook said. "The Neighborhood Markets are the same as a supermarket like Albertson's or Safeway. Some supermarkets start (pay) at $7 an hour, but they do get benefits. These people (employees at Wal-Mart) have to pay for theirs," Hornbrook said. So the UCFW is protesting each of the five new Wal-Mart Neighborhood Markets in the Vegas area; this one in Henderson opened June 29.

    Wal-Mart is infamous for its labor and consumer battles—more than 40 cases alleging the company prevented workers from receiving adequate wage and overtime pay are being considered by courts for class-action status. Additionally, six current and former female employees are pursuing a class-action lawsuit charging that Wal-Mart discriminates against women in its promotion practices.

    "We're just trying to help the women that get discriminated against in Wal-Mart," says Greer. "We're out here suffering a lot for these people." He pauses, moves his sign so that it blocks the scorching sun on his leathery face, and considers the working conditions of his colleagues out here working for the union.

    "We had one gal out here in her 40s, and she had a heat stroke. I kept making her sit down, I noticed she was stepping (staggering), and I made her sit in the shade," Greer said. She went home sick after her shift and didn't ever return to work.

    Another woman, Greer said, had huge blisters on her feet and he took her inside to the Wal-Mart pharmacy. The pharmacist recommended some balm, and Greer bought it for her. Since then, he said, other picketers have purchased the balm for their blisters inside the Wal-Mart they are protesting.

    The group has no transportation to go elsewhere—they are dropped off by a union van and picked up later. On weekends, they have to find their own transportation, Greer said.

    Inside, the store manager at the Stephanie Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market says he's perfectly happy with his job, and that his insurance is fine.

    "The average rate of pay for Nevada Wal-Mart workers is $10.17 an hour. We have a good insurance program, and every associate—even part-timers—are eligible for the 401k," says Mark Dyson. "There's actually different levels of insurance, dental and medical—I have a $500 deductible, but there's no cap on it. Some other companies' plans have a $1 million cap, but here there's no cap. For example, not long ago we had an associate whose husband needed a liver transplant, and that alone was $600,000; but they didn't have to worry about a cap."

    For the least comprehensive medical coverage, Wal-Mart workers pay from $17.50 for individual coverage and $70.50 for family coverage biweekly, according to the company website.

    "And we are actively promoting and developing women in the workforce," Dyson says. "I think every company has gone through an issue like this, but you should hire the best workers regardless of gender or race or anything else."

    In Dyson's market, the air-conditioning is cool, business on this day seems brisk, and the employees seem not so miserable; two checkers chat it up as they ring up customers.

    This is not lost on the picketers outside.

    Rivera removes his watch to show the dark tan his arm has gotten working in the sun; he talks about how he takes three buses to get to this work site on weekends; it takes two hours to get there and two hours to get home—a nine-hour day including that transportation for a gross pay of $35.

    "I asked him (union organizer Hornbrook), I said, 'How come we're working here for $6 an hour? I need you to help us find a better job. I want information on the union,'" Rivera said.

    He was told, he says, to secure his own job with a grocery store, and then the union would help him to be sure the store paid him appropriate wages.

    "This is an informational picket line only," Hornbrook said. "We're paying these people. They were out of work before (joining their picket lines). This is an in-between-jobs stop. Picketing isn't a career. But we did hire one of the picketers, she's now working for us for $11 an hour (as a driver) and we pay for gasoline."

    The UFCW's website concludes, "Every person working hard for a living earns the right to a decent wage, affordable health care and a voice on the job. But Wal-Mart's greed provides other companies a license to chip away at the rights of working America, influencing everything from wages to working conditions."

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    Default umm excuse me!

    I tread into tis discussion very lightly but I do believe I have a valid point. I think that the issue here is not wether or not Wal-Mart is an evil entity or not is only a small spot on the overall picture. What is at the core of this discussion is true capitalism or socialized capitalism.
    IMHO
    Does or do they not have the right to pay workers what they feel is a fair wage? (not what you think a fair wage is but what the economics say a fair wage is) In a free market, capitalist society they do. They have the right to pay their employees what they will work for. If they can't get the employees because the pay is too low then they will have to raise their pay rates.
    But here in the us we have this grand notion of "Minimum Wage" (notice it does not say Minimum Living Wage) and we say that this is what people will must be paid at least. And the fact of the matter is, people are always willing to work for Wal Mart. If the employees feel that they are not treated fairly, then go find a job that pays what they want. If Walmart can't get the employees then they will have to pay their current employees more to keep them and they will have to increase their wages to get new employees. But people flock to work at WalMart in droves.
    Also we have this demand in our country for cheap goods. We want our TV for $99. Well if it costs such and such to amke the TV and then shippiing it and everything else then whatever is left is used to pay the employee. If you want walmart to pay its empployees better then you will have to accept that their prices will have to rise at large rates.
    My belief is this, let Walmart employees decide what the fair wage should be, either by quitting and going elsewhere. That may sound harsh but it is the reality, Until WalMart is forced to change by its employees then it wont change. If the employees want to unionize and Walmart shuts down the store then that is their perogative. It is their buisness. Their money.
    I personally am not a big fan of Walmart but I do shop there. The price is right. The fact of the matter is this, If they Unionize then the price of their goods will go up. plain and simple.

    BTW
    Walmart:

    business volume (2002): 187.30 Billion Euro
    profit (2002): 5.67 Billion Euro
    employees (2002): 1.387.000
    do you realize that this is only a 3% margin of profit that they operate on. And this is not from retail profit.
    Walmart has a 90 day pay policy to its vendors, it turns its inventory over (dollar wise) in under 30 days.
    That means that Walmart sits on it payables for about 60 days to earn interest in order to earn its profits. If it had a quick pay policy to its vendors and did not increase prices, Walmart would lose money on just retail sales. Walmart operates on thin margins to provide the Lowest possible price, It could charge more and maybe make alot of money real quick but that bubble would burst due to reduced sales.
    If my Dads own company of 15 employees operated on that tight of a margin, it would be bankrupt in very short order.
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrnea
    I tread into tis discussion very lightly but I do believe I have a valid point. I think that the issue here is not wether or not Wal-Mart is an evil entity or not is only a small spot on the overall picture. What is at the core of this discussion is true capitalism or socialized capitalism.
    IMHO
    Does or do they not have the right to pay workers what they feel is a fair wage? (not what you think a fair wage is but what the economics say a fair wage is) In a free market, capitalist society they do. They have the right to pay their employees what they will work for. If they can't get the employees because the pay is too low then they will have to raise their pay rates.
    But here in the us we have this grand notion of "Minimum Wage" (notice it does not say Minimum Living Wage) and we say that this is what people will must be paid at least. And the fact of the matter is, people are always willing to work for Wal Mart. If the employees feel that they are not treated fairly, then go find a job that pays what they want. If Walmart can't get the employees then they will have to pay their current employees more to keep them and they will have to increase their wages to get new employees. But people flock to work at WalMart in droves.
    Also we have this demand in our country for cheap goods. We want our TV for $99. Well if it costs such and such to amke the TV and then shippiing it and everything else then whatever is left is used to pay the employee. If you want walmart to pay its empployees better then you will have to accept that their prices will have to rise at large rates.
    My belief is this, let Walmart employees decide what the fair wage should be, either by quitting and going elsewhere. That may sound harsh but it is the reality, Until WalMart is forced to change by its employees then it wont change. If the employees want to unionize and Walmart shuts down the store then that is their perogative. It is their buisness. Their money.
    I personally am not a big fan of Walmart but I do shop there. The price is right. The fact of the matter is this, If they Unionize then the price of their goods will go up. plain and simple.

    BTW


    do you realize that this is only a 3% margin of profit that they operate on. And this is not from retail profit.
    Walmart has a 90 day pay policy to its vendors, it turns its inventory over (dollar wise) in under 30 days.
    That means that Walmart sits on it payables for about 60 days to earn interest in order to earn its profits. If it had a quick pay policy to its vendors and did not increase prices, Walmart would lose money on just retail sales. Walmart operates on thin margins to provide the Lowest possible price, It could charge more and maybe make alot of money real quick but that bubble would burst due to reduced sales.
    If my Dads own company of 15 employees operated on that tight of a margin, it would be bankrupt in very short order.
    Random thoughts:

    1. So what?

    2. The issue isn't capitalism or socialized capitalism. It is about a US corporation who stepped (continues to step) up to the plate and gave a very significant sum of money to people who are in dire need.

    3. Walmart is not the only corporation to operate this way.

    4. Walmart has a responsibility to follow the law when it comes to paying their employees. If they don't pay their employees "enough", then those employees can go elsewhere.

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