1. #1
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    Thumbs up New Lightweight HURST Spreader

    I recently received some info in the mail from our local Hust Rep. on a new spreader that has just been released. It is called the "Enforcer". It weighs in at 48 pounds. Spread distance is 28 inches. And the spread force is listed at 44,000 pounds. According to the rep. it is designed to be one person use. He said it has "motorcycle" type grip in the rear and a completly redesigned control valve assembly that can be operated by the same hand that is on the rear grip. It looks really impressive. I mention this because, for the first time in history, Hurst has developed a "lightweight" spreader. My department is a Hurst department, but sometimes the weight can be a disadvantage. But, we still love 'em. Also, some departments who are looking for tools, may be very interested in some of the newer "lighter" Hurst tools.

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    The spreader is a Lukas tool with Hurst stickers slapped on it. The spreading force is at the last part of the tips all the way down the spreader arms. I think they said its 43 pounds though, but I could be wrong.

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    not true - hurst put the twist-grip and a redesigned upper grip on it because that is what the consumer wanted. the technology is all hurst. since hurst makes centuar (lukas), the designs were bound to come together sooner or later. oh, and the spread force is measured at the tips.

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    Centaur is Lukas in the rest of the world. Made by Lukas. The spreading force is down the arms. Its marketing BS by the company's out there. The tip spreading force is alot lower. If you read the NFPA 1936 standard and see where they measure for HSF(Highest Spreading Force) is at the tips and those numbers are alot lower than MSF(Maximum Spreading Force). MSF is taken from the furthest point with gripping surface on the spreader tips or arms. As you know the Farther down the arm you go the higher the force will be. So, it's marketing, and good marketing at that. As an example look at the holmatro 3150UL combi tool. The maximim spreading force "at back of tips" is 16,166 lbs, and the HSF(highest spreading force at tips(per NFPA 1936) is 7,541 lbs, little bit of a difference there Don't you think. Look at any of the Genesis or Holmatro Spreaders, and the one NFPA compliant amkus spreader and you see the difference in these numbers. Another example is the Amkus AMK-24 spreader, Max Spreading Force is 18,785 and the Highest Spreading Force per NFPA is 10,100 lbs. With all tools you need to look at the NFPA ratings of the tools especially when its cutters. Maximum cutting force means about jack Sh*t. You need to look at the NFPA ratings ABCDE. This will tell you what a tool can do in the real world. But since everything revolves around money, marketing is how they sell tools it seems.
    So the next company to come out with a 300,000 lbs cutter will than be on top, the cutter will be mounted to a back hoe or something, but they got your attention didn't they.

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    Not really that impressive, TNT has been making tools in the 40lb range for years.
    FF/NREMT-B

    FTM-PTB!!

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    Nothing is measured "all the way down the spreader arms". "Furthest point with gripping surface on the spreader tips or arms?" Well, since there are no gripping surfaces on the arms, it is measured from the tips, just like I said. Bottom of the tips,yes, but tips nonetheless.Yes, there will be a difference in force from the absolute end of the tip and 4 inches lower at the bottom of the tip, but how often do you do a spread using just the last quarter inch of your tips? I've been taught to get the largest purchase point possible, utilizing the entire tip if possible. Somewhere around here I have the NFPA ratings for the Defender - I'll try to find them and get them posted.

    Marketing BS, maybe - but everybody is using the same BS. Yes, the HSF is being used for marketing, but everybody uses these same standards - so we are still talking about apples vs apples. The smart buyer will do his homework and look beyond the magazine ads and the sales hype.

    Personally, I don't like the twist-grip. I'm a old-school Hurst fan. I hope Hurst keeps the Hurst & Centuar lines separated. I'd really hate to see Hurst morph into some kind of bastardized Hurst/Lukas hybrid.
    Last edited by MEAN15; 10-05-2005 at 08:31 PM.

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    Mean,I don't think that's going to be a problem for ya. Hurst is LOW pressure(5000psi) and Centaur(old Lukas)is (10,000psi).It's rather difficult(damn near impossible)to marry the two technologies.Plus as far as I know,only Centaur uses the "motorcycle grip" in the Hurst ltools.I didn't check the website but I'd bet you lunch that the "Enforcer"is on the Centaur side of the Hurst lineup.Lighter? Yes. Better,Hehe subject to debate. A Transformer,not even close. If I find that this IS a low pressure tool,I'll repost. T.C.

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    Yes, the Defender is a Hurst (5000psi) tool, but it sure as hell looks like a Centaur. I realize the technologies are not interchangeable - I tear these things apart and put them back together for a living. I was worried about the styling getting morphed together (handles, twist grip controls, etc). Hurst offers a twist-grip option on it's cutters & combi-tools, but it's about a $700 option. Give me the old thumb control anyday.

    By the way - you owe me lunch.
    Last edited by MEAN15; 10-05-2005 at 08:34 PM.

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    According to the rep. it is designed to be one person use.
    It's about time!

    Although I'm a "holmatro" man all the way, I've gotta say that the weight factor has been the biggest disadvantage Hurst have ever faced....
    Luke

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    Quote Originally Posted by MEAN15
    Hurst offers a twist-grip option on it's cutters & combi-tools, but it's about a $700 option. Give me the old thumb control anyday
    Why? Our current tools still have the thumb levers, but I must say, after I used TNT tools, I love the twist grip. Regardless of which way I have tool orientedI can operate it without having to make my hand look like a swans neck. And it keeps both hands on the tool securely. It's a safer way of doing things, it really is. Welcome to evolution bro..
    FF/NREMT-B

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    Brass does not equal brains.

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    I've used both styles extensively. I did not say anything bad about the twist -I've got nothing against the twist. I merely stated that I prefer the thumb control. I'm quite sure there are many that share your opinion also.

    As far as the safety issue - safety comes from what you do with your brain, not your hands.

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    Still using Hurst, still wondering why most of their tools have the thumb switch (which I prefer) but the rams all have twist grips, which I dislike. Have yet to have a thumb switch stick, have had the twist grips on the rams repaired/replaced multiple times.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    Bones,Quit breaking 'em,hehe T.C.

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    I couldn't find anything in Hurst or Centaur line called the "Enforcer", there is however a new ML-28 "Defender" spreader in the Hurst line that (coincidentally enough) has a spreading force of 44,000 lbs and pulling force of 20,000 lbs and weighs in at 48 lbs.
    http://www.hurstjaws.com/products/spreaders.asp

    It has what they are calling a Motorcycle style grip which replaced the older handle that was a smaller diameter hollow tube. The control valve is NOT manipulated by this (ah la Holmatro et. al.) but rather by a new "stargrip actuator" which is pretty much a multi indentation wheel around the "throat" of the new handle.

    FWIW - the new agency I'm with is an all Hurst agency and we had a table top demo of this tool last night. We have begun the approval process to purchase this spreader and a X-Tractor II cutter to replace the 2 man JL-32 Spreaders and equally as old cutters.

    Coming from an all Holmatro agency - I actually like the new "stargrip" set-up because it allows manipulation of the control valve from any position but w/o the annoying rotating hand grip that Holmatro had.

    It will most likely take a month or more to get all the approvals, purchasing & delivery but after a get a hands on test - I'll post back a few thoughts on it.
    Take Care - Stay Safe - God Bless
    Stephen
    FF/Paramedic
    Instructor

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    I've been using a "lightweight Hurst spreader" for years... it is called a Phoenix Rescue Equipment Model 25 Tool. Same guy designed it that designed the Model 32 Hurst... and the Phoenix weighs just 45 pounds.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

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