Thread: Bail Out Kit

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    Default Bail Out Kit

    Hello,

    I operate in a rural area, with area structures not rising above two or three stories. I am interested in purchasing one or more tools to use in the event I must bail out of a building. I'm not sure what is best or what is needed though. Any ideas on what I should get and where to find it? Any ideas on what else I should have in my gear as well? I currently have a surefire flashlight, two pairs fire gloves, pair of rescue gloves, hood, resque wrench, window punch, seatbelt cutter, multitool, tape. It aint much. I plan on purchasing rubber wedges in the near future.

    Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by imnumber1
    Hello,

    I operate in a rural area, with area structures not rising above two or three stories. I am interested in purchasing one or more tools to use in the event I must bail out of a building. I'm not sure what is best or what is needed though. Any ideas on what I should get and where to find it? Any ideas on what else I should have in my gear as well? I currently have a surefire flashlight, two pairs fire gloves, pair of rescue gloves, hood, resque wrench, window punch, seatbelt cutter, multitool, tape. It aint much. I plan on purchasing rubber wedges in the near future.

    Thanks
    A good start, I'll tell you what I have in my gear...a lot of people on my dept think I'm a friggin toolbox, but I have yet to get myself caught in a pinch.

    In my Jacket,

    HEPA Mask
    Disposable Waterproof Camera, scene pics for scrap book, or training.
    Two pair of EMS gloves
    Speaker mic attached to gear keeper for my portable radio

    In my pants,

    My bailout bag, which includes 2 carabieners, a YATES descender and 50ft of NFPA rated line. That takes up one pocket and it's pre rigged.

    Two wooden wedges
    EMS Shears
    Wire Cutters
    A Cearly Rescue Strap from CMC Rescue with a carabiener on one end
    A DC Hinge hook
    And a multipurpose hinge hook/door chock from Thefirestore.com

    I also have a GUT belt from Yates, which is how I use my bailout bag, on that I have my fire gloves, the Recoil Saberlight from pelican, and a Zico Folding Spanner. Then on my helmet I have 4 more wooden wedges. My extrication gloves, hold my safety glasses and a pair of EMS gloves, those stay in my locker unless needed. If you have the TFT Rescue wrench get rid of it, they are junk. Good idea, poor execution. I'd suggest a few things..

    Don't bother with rubber wedges, they are expensive, and they melt. You can cut yourself a liftime supply of wooden ones out of a 4ft long 2x4. And wood is cheap from Home Depot, or Lowes, or a construction sites scrap, then it's free. Make sure though you cut them to fit inside a sprinkler orifice, should you have any buildings with sprinklers. The other things that could be useful, a utility knife, a 10ft piece of tubular webbing, or whatever else you think you may have a use for. But try to keep things as organized as possible so you know where it is when you need it, and so you dont have to dig to get it. Stay safe bro..
    FF/NREMT-B

    FTM-PTB!!

    Brass does not equal brains.

    Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the ability to control it.

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    I'm in a rural area too, and the only thing I would add is a good set of wire cutters. I'v gotten hung up on barbed wire with my bunker pants, and had a heck of a time getting off. I carry fencing pliers. They are handy for several things. They make a decent hammer in a pinch, and you can pry w/ the handles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lenny91
    I'm in a rural area too, and the only thing I would add is a good set of wire cutters. I'v gotten hung up on barbed wire with my bunker pants, and had a heck of a time getting off. I carry fencing pliers. They are handy for several things. They make a decent hammer in a pinch, and you can pry w/ the handles.
    I forgot Linesmans pliers, Klien Tools makes the best ones, and the are rather inexpensive.
    FF/NREMT-B

    FTM-PTB!!

    Brass does not equal brains.

    Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the ability to control it.

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    I have webbing, chocks, and wire cutters in my pockets on the outside. I'm happy with that stuff. But I put together a bail out kit for when I have to go interior into a smoke condition or confirmed fire. I put it together for about 150 dollars. I got a GUT Belt with bail out bag. The bag has 9 mil kevlar rope and a beaner already attached on the outside and 40 or 50 foot of rope. I then bought a figure 8 webbing loop and a large beaner for ladder work and two smaller self locking ones for bailing. I can do it in the dark if I have too. Take the beaner with the rope , tie off to something secure or really heavy. Toss the rope out the window, wrap a beaner 3 times and do the "slide"(rope under your arms and hold on tight and the friction b/t the beaner and your arm pits should be enough to decend quickly but not fast. Hope that helps, if anyone wants more info PM me.
    Piscataway Fire Dist #2
    Possumtown V.F.C.

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    Jacket:
    Flashlight
    screwdriver (with multiple bits)
    crescent wrench (for battery terminal disconnecting)
    short length of webbing
    truckman's belt

    Pants:
    Gloves (one pair, the spare pairs get carried in a backpack I leave on the truck)
    Bailout kit (75' of 8mm static rope, two carabiners, a crevice anchor which looks like a wedge on a metal cable...it can be slammed in a door jam to create a quick anchor point)

    Backpack that stays on the truck:
    hearing protection
    HEPA mask
    spare flashlight
    spare FF gloves
    extrication gloves
    rope gloves
    work gloves
    streamlight fire vulcan
    leather radio strap
    spare hood
    pocket mask
    sunglasses

    I also carry a 36" TNT tool with a strap on it that I made out of an old SCBA harness.

    Moral of my story...don't load up your gear with stuff, just carry an accessory backpack or bag or whatever.

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    First chance you get,if it's offered in your area or a state school,take a Firefighter Survival and rescue class.It won't be like the military SERES class where you are handed a rabbit,canteen,compass and a heading and told"See ya in three days if you live that long."
    It's about getting the H outta Dodge when the roof collapses,or your way in gets overrun by fire and you and/or a buddy are hurt.

    20 feet of 1 1/2" webbing tied into a loop will get you out of a second story window.
    Anchor a halligan in the corner of a window with the tubing around it,check below and climb out.Take it slow and look before you do anything.
    You might see that your buddies heard your Mayday and have set up a ladder and are coming after you.
    Last edited by doughesson; 09-28-2005 at 03:45 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by doughesson
    20 feet of 1 1/2" webbing tied into a loop will get you out of a second story window.
    It will? Some of our second stories are 35-40ft above ground. I'd say you'll be a few feet short.
    FF/NREMT-B

    FTM-PTB!!

    Brass does not equal brains.

    Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the ability to control it.

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    Seems like you guys carry alot of gear.

    I have nothing more than 3 stories in my speacial called area and nothing more than 2 stories in my response district. My thought is if I have to get out I am going to hang and drop. It is a hell of lot quicker to do if things are that bad.

    For other items 1 wedge, garrity light, survivor light, 25' length rope for utility purposes, leatherman, pen, window punch and thats it. I try to stay light as possible.

    And remember "put the fire out and you wont have to jump out windows"
    LT. A. Fredricks God Speed

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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainS
    And remember "put the fire out and you wont have to jump out windows"
    True, but things can change in a heartbeat, better to be prepared than dead.
    FF/NREMT-B

    FTM-PTB!!

    Brass does not equal brains.

    Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the ability to control it.

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    Close enough for government work in my opinion.The tallest building in my district is a three story split level home.
    Just because you might come up a few feet short is no reason NOT to carry self rescue gear.
    I took Kentucky's Firefighter survival and rescue class last spring after getting hurt at my other job.
    If you are in good shape,and my complaint those two days was my shoulder hurt when I moved in certain positions,you can take a 10 ft drop while packed up.
    Bottom line is,if the world is going to s*** around me,I am getting out,with my buddy or I am going to believe that we'll make it right up until the light goes out for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by pfd4life
    It will? Some of our second stories are 35-40ft above ground. I'd say you'll be a few feet short.

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    I agree with the firefighter survival training. All our members on the dept are required to complete the training within two years.
    It long, hot (in the summer) and really physically exhausting if you're not in shape. But it will teach you to use your head and trust in your gear and equipment. I've always been told that if a firefighter gets into a life or death situation, they will always fall back on their training. I've been close a couple times, and it's pretty much true. so my advice is to take the class as soon as it's available, and then every three to five years from then on. Just my 2 cents.

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    Check the Specialized Rescue Forum, for a thread on Roof Rope bags, there are some ideas and discussions in there also.
    ------------------------------------
    These opinions are mine and do not reflect the opinions of any organizations I am affiliated with.
    ------------------------------------

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    I dunno if Kentucky requires refresher training but it is a good idea.The course is required anyway for firefighters coming on after 2001.
    Another thing,around here anyway,is that they find the smallest person taking the course and buddy them up with the biggest guy in the class for the catapult drill.What fun,what fun.
    I was taking a forcible entry class last month in Louisville and a classmate was watching the the FFS&R class so I asked if she'd taken it yet.She said no and I mentioned that little tidbit for when she does take it.This woman was 5' and I wonder if she's going to go EMT on her department and try to stay out of the buildings.


    [QUOTE=Plattsfire2]I agree with the firefighter survival training. All our members on the dept are required to complete the training within two years.
    QUOTE]

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    I am in total agreement with FF Survival training, but have noticed over the last 2-3 years, with alot of emphassis on Survival training, there isnt alot more education on how to help prevent and reconize problems prior to them happening, espically for newer recruits etc.

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    I wear a level 2 seat harness on my pants and use Rit Rescue's egress pack attached to my air pack for a bail out kit. (www.ritrescuesystems.com)

    My original kit was a gut belt and decent device with about 50' of 8mm stuffed in a pocket.

    I've got my pockets stuffed with Klien cutters, webbing, my 8mm is now 20' of tag or utility line, and chocks. The only thing I have to add that I haven't seen above is I bought a good haligan bar (pro-bar). If I'm doing any interior work, that thing is never to far from me. Of course, we've got HB's on the rigs, but they bought the cheap ones. I won't go into all the uses of a good halligan, but let me just say it's my favorite. As far as self-rescue, it can be used for an anchor or simply to breach a wall.

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    Quote Originally Posted by doughesson
    Close enough for government work in my opinion.The tallest building in my district is a three story split level home.
    Just because you might come up a few feet short is no reason NOT to carry self rescue gear.
    I took Kentucky's Firefighter survival and rescue class last spring after getting hurt at my other job.
    If you are in good shape,and my complaint those two days was my shoulder hurt when I moved in certain positions,you can take a 10 ft drop while packed up.
    Bottom line is,if the world is going to s*** around me,I am getting out,with my buddy or I am going to believe that we'll make it right up until the light goes out for me.
    Very true, just goes to show how important it is in knowing your district. I wasn't saying your wrong, I would just rather get to the ground without any kind of freefall in between.
    FF/NREMT-B

    FTM-PTB!!

    Brass does not equal brains.

    Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the ability to control it.

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