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Thread: Fireground Tricks of the Trade.....

  1. #76
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    do your chin strap up on your helmet. it might be annoying having to unbuckle the thing when you take your mask off, but it is more than worth the risk.
    "There are only two things that i know are infinite, the universe and human stupidity. And im not so sure about the former."

    For all the life of me, i cant see a firefighter going to hell. At least not for very long. We would end up putting out all the fires and annoying the devil too much.

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    Default Tricks

    For MVA's I have set up a small plastic toolbox and marked it the "Quick attack box". It is on our rescue and contains all the little items you need at most MVA's. Window punch, duct tape, linemans plyers for removing battery terminals or cutting cables, shave cream, tennis ball, screwdriver for inflator hunting, piece of webbing to secure doors, seatbelt cutters, box knife, and probably an item or two I cant think of right now. This saves my guys from havin to carry this stuff in their pockets and risking injury and saves us from havin to make a million trips back to the rescue. We set the box at the base of the windshield, on the hood for all to dig into.

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    cappyy: what is the tennis ball for in your mva box?
    i like the idea of having everything together, especially all the smaller items.

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    I have seen tennis balls used to cover the ends of the A pillars that are cut.
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainGonzo
    I have seen tennis balls used to cover the ends of the A pillars that are cut.

    gotcha. i've seen sections of old 5" hose, no tennis balls.

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    Default Tennis ball

    We use the tennis ball in case its just fluids down and we want to play a game of catch(insert smiley face here if I could figure the damn thing out).

    Seriously...One tennis ball, wrapped with duct tape for a better grip and forced under the door handle of the door you are trying to pop. Now with the spreaders forcing the door at the latch, the ball helps the door to pop alot quicker because it keeps the latch in the opened position.

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    Cool.
    I know having the latch open helps, that sounds like a good trick.

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    I feel that its alot safer than havin someone hold the door handle up with their hand in case the door pops with any force. It works for us.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NDeMarse
    Hardwood floors are easy enough. Pike through the floor then pry backwards on the adz (it is it's own fulcrum) to rip up a board. Move to a joist and slide the pike under the floor and pull towards the adz using the joist as a fulcrum. I have never really found a need to rip up a hardwood floor at a fire. The drills that I have attended in case it was needed, the halligan works great. I have used both tools though

    Chopping a windshild can be done with the short strokes using the forked end. I guess it would be faster to do with an axe, so you might have me here. Then again, we have to get the posts cut, so we might have some time to do it with the forks or go get the windshield saw or saw-zall.

    I don't cut peaked roofs, so I am not up there to use either tool. I have used a pick-axe on a peaked roof prior to my career here, and I prefer either a maul, sledge or the back of the flathead axe to bash though. A halligan can be used, use the corner of the tool between the adz and the pike end. Opens up a larger area, but it will be more work since it is lighter.

    I do think it is easier to punch out a trunk lock with a halligan. The shorter tool allows for better accuracy if you are doing a 1 man swing. If you are not doing a 1 man operation (usually there are plenty of FFs looking for work at autos) you have a strike surface on the other side of the point so it can be driven through the lock.

    I think it is also easier to peel a auto hood back. Drive the pike into the hood and pry backwards over the adz (just like on the wood floor) and it will open up a large corner of the hood.

    However, my choice for getting under the hood at an auto fire is to break out the front grill (obviously after the main body of fire is knocked down), find the hood release cord, put the wire between the forks and twist several times to the right. This will operate the hood release just like if you pulled it from the interior. Open the hood and chock it open. After that, I have heard differing opinions, but I've always used the fork end to pry the terminals off of the battery. I have never heard of anyone being zapped, but I suppose it could happen.

    I've been arguing pickhead vs halligan for awhile brother! Don't get me wrong, I love tradition. If I had to chose 1 tool to bring in to a burning building for versatility it would definately be a halligan tool over a pickhead.

    Don't mistake my dislike of the pick-head axe as a bash on your department or tools. You guys work great with pickheads and there are several members that really know the capabilities of the tool. This has stirred quite a bit of discussion on the different tasks that can be accomplished with both tools. Nice job!
    Isn't a halligan a prying tool?

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    Default tight door jam

    I hope this one was'nt posted already, I did'nt see it!

    If you have to force a door by yourself (outward opening door). If the jamb is real tight you can take your door chock and drive it into the jam. This should (not always) spread the door enough for you to get a purchace with your haligan.

    PS GREAT THREAD LADIES and GENTS. reading some cool stuff.

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    This is for the pump operators,

    Ever get that emergency call when you have hose on the ground (training or such) and have to disconnect the pre-connect in a quick fashion. Instead of leaving 50’ connected to the truck or climbing up on the rig to disconnect it at the discharge, make yourself a 10’ pigtail for each pre-connect. Saves a lot of time, just disconnect the pigtail from the attack line and you’re off.

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    Cut up a few lengths of PVC pipe about 30cm (1') and cut out a strip about 25mm(1") thick down the side of it. cut a couple of holes in it for easier gripping. and use it to cover up all the sharp edges when you are cutting a car up. Dont know if you yanks do that as standard, so if you do, my apologies.

    Also have some precut chocks for stabilising cars. I have seen some really neat storage systems for them on trucks, but i dont know if i can describe them using words alone.
    "There are only two things that i know are infinite, the universe and human stupidity. And im not so sure about the former."

    For all the life of me, i cant see a firefighter going to hell. At least not for very long. We would end up putting out all the fires and annoying the devil too much.

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    captjab- We have pigtails on all our preconnects including 2 1/2. You are correct sir, they come in real handy. By the way, we bought ours.
    engine13A likes this.

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    ::::Bump::::
    Proud East Coast Traditionalist.

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    Question

    When making the bottom cut on an enlarged opening, what is the best way to make the initial cut to keep the chainsaw from "jumping" to the side? Do you rev up the rpm's on the saw and force the saw in? Do you hold the saw at an angle?
    28 P.R.I.D.E.
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    Not quite sure what your getting at. But, you should be at full throttle prior to intoducing the saw to the material being cut. Allow the saw to do the work, forcing it might "bog" the saw down, thus slowing your cut and maybe freezing the chain requiring you to back off re-throttle and then cut again.
    Just another one of the 99%ers looking up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skwerl530
    Uh I mean manufactured house. Use the hook on a drywall hook to rip the siding then tear it back with said hook. If there is paneling on the inside push it in with the blunt bit of an axe. Don't try to cut it with the blade, it will take forever. Just "jab" it with the head of the axe where the paneling is nailed to the wall.

    For those that don't know, this is a drywall hook:
    http://www.emc4rescue.com/catalogs/e...d/it010028.htm

    No I don't sell them this was just the 1st picture I found.

    We just got a couple of these tools...MAN are they nice...can make some quick work of overhaul

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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain5505
    Sawsall or window saw both will produce fine dust. Use what you use everyday " Shaving Cream " run a bead of this around the window before cutting, this traps all the dust on the side that the rescuer is on. Try it before ya knock it.

    At my former job we used shaving cream when cutting or drilling into asbestos floor tiles. It would catch a lot of the bad stuff. I have never tried it on a window, but it would be great.

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    Default nozzleman in a stairway?

    Hey, anyone know a good trick for keeping a handline from making you slide down the stairs when trying to hold a good position? I imagine someone will say stay at the bottom. duh I mean when that's not a great option, like in a stairway that turns.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rmhinkle
    Hey, anyone know a good trick for keeping a handline from making you slide down the stairs when trying to hold a good position? I imagine someone will say stay at the bottom. duh I mean when that's not a great option, like in a stairway that turns.

    Could you clarify this. Do you mean....stretch up to the 5th floor, for a fire...or....charging the line...then advancing up to the 5th floor....or maybe.....stay at the floor below...and lob water in?

    Basically the "trick" to maintaining the hose line, position and fluid momentum...is....

    A GOOD BACK UP MAN. He is to take the weight of the line....and make life for the Nozzleman easy.
    IACOJ Member

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    Quote Originally Posted by VinnieB
    A GOOD BACK UP MAN. He is to take the weight of the line....and make life for the Nozzleman easy.
    And a smooth bore definitely helps too
    "Train as if your life depends on it"
    Always Remember *343*

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    Default Clarification

    Hey, yeah I just meant when you open the bale what's the best position to stay in to keep the hose from wanting to slide down the stairway. I know you're kinda fighting gravity here, and it's just one of those tough spots. I was just seeing if anyone had some tricks. No big deal if no one has an answer.

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    The best position to place the hose to keep it from sliding back is in the hands of a good back up man. He should be taking most of the brunt while the tip man directs the stream. If youre fighting for control of the tip youre not directing the stream like you should.
    Just another one of the 99%ers looking up.

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    Default tricks and ?s

    when overhauling the top floor in a house and asked to poke your head in the attic/cockloft if you see cobwebs or spider webs don't bother up there anymore they vaporise very quickly at a very low temp.
    trying to get of the roof in a pinch carry 40' of webbing with a caribiner and a halligan up with you. take the biiner and put it in the spkie end and then slam it into the roof. wrap the webbing down the handle and off the roof you go.
    quick question. im a mechanic and i know we are alway tod not to use Cheater bars (pieces of pipe you slip on the handle of a wrench, ratchet, breaker bar) because the tool cant handle the extra load on it. if yo put 2 halligans together isn't that the same type of thing? i have no doubt that it works but is it the safe thing to be telling people about?

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    If you are using a hurst tool with a manifold (allows you to attach up to three pieces of equipment) and while in the process of connecting the hoses together you cannot get a hose to connect due to built up pressure in the line (happens when someone pressurizes the system before both the male and female are connected, the male side will not lock into the female; some call it a dead-head) a simple and safe way to solve this is to throw the hurst generator into dump, then the manifold, and then place the manifold back into pressure (leave the generator in dump). DUMP, DUMP, PRESSURE. This will releave the pressure throughout the system allowing you to place the hoses together. After, place the generator back into pressue and continue.
    Another way is to throw the system into dump and press the male end into the ground (on a clean rag to avoid contamination <dirt and sand>). This will take some weight and will not be as easy as the above mentioned.

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