Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Page 6 of 8 FirstFirst ... 345678 LastLast
Results 101 to 120 of 150
Like Tree2Likes

Thread: Fireground Tricks of the Trade.....

  1. #101
    Forum Member DeputyChiefGonzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Somewhere between genius and insanity!
    Posts
    13,556

    Default

    Keep a roll of duct tape and a permanent marker in the compartment nearest to the pump panel. When you have mutiple lines off the rig with members of different companies taking the lines, rip off a piece of duct tape, put it on the panel just under the valve control or gauge and mark the company's ID on it. That way, when a company calls for more pressure or to have a line shut down, you won't shut down the wrong one by mistake.
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY


  2. #102
    Forum Member KEEPBACK200FEET's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    East Carolina University
    Posts
    1,176

    Default

    I learned in a Truckie class that sometimes, when your doing what you have to do, and no one is available, you can set up your ladder, and drive the spike of the halligan in the ground tight up against the butt of the ladder to hold it down.
    Just know, I chose my own fate. I drove by the fork in the road and went straight.

    Quote Originally Posted by FlyingKiwi View Post
    Go put your pussy 2 1/2" lines away kiddies.

    Quote Originally Posted by Explorer343

    By the way KEEPBACK200FEET, you're so dramatic!

  3. #103
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    248

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainGonzo
    Keep a roll of duct tape and a permanent marker in the compartment nearest to the pump panel. When you have mutiple lines off the rig with members of different companies taking the lines, rip off a piece of duct tape, put it on the panel just under the valve control or gauge and mark the company's ID on it. That way, when a company calls for more pressure or to have a line shut down, you won't shut down the wrong one by mistake.
    You can also use an eraseable marker, the kind you use on a white board, and write on the stainless steel next to each pump gauge. You can put the number of the engine that is using that line, what floor, etc... It wipes off with a dry towel, rag, etc..

  4. #104
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    8

    Default

    When forced to bail out of an upper story window on a rope, instead of trying to hold a tool in the corner of the window as an anchor while you bail, if the wall next to the window is sheetrock, simply ram the head of your tool through the 'rock, tie your escape line to the tool, then drop the handle down into the hole. This holds the tool in place for you.

    Also, if the outer wall is relatively flimsy, just drive something all the way through it, and tie your bailout line around the windowframe and adjoining studs through the hole.

    Everyone should know the airpack body rappel as well: Hold your line in one hand, pass it between your bottle and frame, and hold the running end up against your chest. Bail. The friction your pack creates on the rope will slow your descent.

  5. #105
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6

    Default Stick in the mud

    KEEPBACK200FEET: I learned in a Truckie class that sometimes, when your doing what you have to do, and no one is available, you can set up your ladder, and drive the spike of the halligan in the ground tight up against the butt of the ladder to hold it down.

    I'f I'm that strapped for manpower I definitely don't want my partner (the Halligan) stuck in the mud just for some good ladder footing. If the ground is soft enough to drive the halligan into, drive the butt of the ladder into it instead. If you have the type of ladder that has the large feet or "paws" on it, they should be still able to be dug in if flipped into the up position.

    If I am missing the point here and it still is necessary to foot the ladder, I would utilize one of those straight prybars, a picket, or a crowbar.

    The halligan is much too useful to be a "stick in the mud" on the fireground.

    PS- Let's bring back the Pick head Axe battles again...they were great! I've never had my 8lb pickhead axe be afraid of heights or not start for me, but I still sleep with my halligan!

  6. #106
    FIGJAM lutan1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    I come from The Land Down Under!
    Posts
    1,833

    Default

    How about, "Put the wet stuff on the red stuff"....
    Luke

  7. #107
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    80

    Default Hose Loads

    Has anyone ever pulled a cross lay and it end up in a big pile of knots on the ground? or pulled off a couple of flakes and realized that the D/O has not gotten the rest. Are dept. has started to triple load the hose, basicly you loop your cross lay into three equal parts with the nozzle about tree feet longer than the loop and lace it like normal. Works great no knots no mess and all the hose comes off flaked. It is even rookie proof, we have used it over a dozen times with great sucess. try it somtime and let me know what you think.

  8. #108
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    80

    Default Hydrant bags

    We keep are hydrant bags connected to the end of are LDH, well the problem is that the bags are heavy and sitting at the top of the truck. We tried keeping them on the tailboard but looks like the poo. So we leave them on top and have a short peice of hose strap tied to the handles, now we can pull the bag from the ground and throw the strap over are shoulder to carry to the hydrant and wrap around the hydrant.Works great.

    Great thread good ideas.

    Work smarter not harder!

  9. #109
    firefighter7160
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default Tricks of the trade

    How about lessons learned. Should of pulled a 2 1/2 inch on this fire. When theres more flames then house left, it should tell you something..... But now I know......lol

  10. #110
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    735

    Default

    Our you kidding me? Where our your hydrant bags kept? LOL

    Just a jab, relax.
    Just another one of the 99%ers looking up.

  11. #111
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    80

    Default

    No jab to me there kept on top of the hose bed. Must be an inside joke.

  12. #112
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    80

    Default

    [QUOTE=PFDTruck18]Our you kidding me? Where our your hydrant bags kept? LOL

    It should be "ARE you kidding me" not "our" and maybe "Were ARE your hydrant bags kept"

    Just a jab though relax lol

  13. #113
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    2,503

    Default

    What the hell is a hydrant bag??? Our you going to tell me or knot?
    I am a complacent liability to the fire service

  14. #114
    MembersZone Subscriber Halligan84's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    Blackwood NJ, USA
    Posts
    816

    Default

    Our hydrant bag is a canvas tool bag kept on the back step with ball valves for side outlets and adapters for various hydrant thread. It gets tossed at the hydrant with the line when laying in.

  15. #115
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    80

    Default

    Same here, not as much stuff because all hydrants in my area are the same thread.


    Hydrant wrench
    Gate valve
    6" fire thread to stortz
    Spanner wrenchs

  16. #116
    MembersZone Subscriber cdemarse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    493

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aneff3904
    Same here, not as much stuff because all hydrants in my area are the same thread.


    Hydrant wrench
    Gate valve
    6" fire thread to stortz
    Spanner wrenchs
    which you can put into a bag therefore making a Hydrant bag
    "Train as if your life depends on it"
    Always Remember *343*

  17. #117
    MembersZone Subscriber AC1503's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    325

    Default

    The dry erase marker will write on the face of the gauge very well too. It can also be used to write the address of the run on the officer's door window or a small dry erase board fastened to the dash.
    Last edited by AC1503; 07-08-2006 at 12:59 AM.

  18. #118
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    735

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aneff3904
    We keep are hydrant bags connected to the end of are LDH, well the problem is that the bags are heavy and sitting at the top of the truck. We tried keeping them on the tailboard but looks like the poo. So we leave them on top and have a short peice of hose strap tied to the handles, now we can pull the bag from the ground and throw the strap over are shoulder to carry to the hydrant and wrap around the hydrant.Works great.

    Great thread good ideas.

    Work smarter not harder!
    Man, are you slow or what?

    Try using "our" and not "are" in many of the sentences in your above quote.

    So slow he didnt even get it!

    Just a jab.
    Just another one of the 99%ers looking up.

  19. #119
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    80

    Default Thanks

    Thanks,
    I would like to thank PFDTruck18 for hosting the latest web cast on sentence structure and correct use of the English language. Itís perfect people like him that makes people go on random shooting spree, because we all now how formal the threads are on Firehouse. Com.

    I would also like to thank him for the input on this particular thread those tried and true tactics that he has shared. Iím glad your taking liking to the ball busting on me I guess I will just weather the storm.

  20. #120
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Central NJ
    Posts
    1,214

    Default

    keep a towel in your engineers compartment. When you've got a poor connection on your suction inlet or a discharge line, drape the towel over it to cause all the water spray to drool onto the ground instead of all over your panel and you.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. World Of Fire Report: 09-11-01 Remembered
    By PaulBrown in forum World of Fire Daily Report
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-11-2003, 01:14 AM
  2. World Of Fire Report: 09-11-01 Remembered
    By PaulBrown in forum World of Fire Daily Report
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-11-2002, 07:23 AM
  3. Tricks of the Trade
    By leatha4eva in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-07-2002, 10:56 PM
  4. Tricks of the Trade
    By 51Truck_K in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-07-2001, 06:23 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts