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Thread: Fireground Tricks of the Trade.....

  1. #121
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    we have a hydrant wrench looped into a rope on our 3 inch supply line.

    Because we drop a line at the hydrant and the next in pumper picks it up.


  2. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by aneff3904
    Thanks,
    I would like to thank PFDTruck18 for hosting the latest web cast on sentence structure and correct use of the English language. Itís perfect people like him that makes people go on random shooting spree, because we all now how formal the threads are on Firehouse. Com.

    I would also like to thank him for the input on this particular thread those tried and true tactics that he has shared. Iím glad your taking liking to the ball busting on me I guess I will just weather the storm.
    It was a joke my friend. Trust me, Im far from a perfect writer. Typical kitchen table banter. Your correction of my post was the kicker and made it all that more funny. Relax brother, no harm intended.

    To answer your question, we keep our hydrant bags in the compartment directly to the rear of the pump panel. Makes it easy for the driver to grab after he drops the tank and heads to the rear to stretch a supply line.
    Just another one of the 99%ers looking up.

  3. #123
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    Oh yes I am called the sarcastic master at my department, and no harm taken. I like the kicthen bannter and the sh** given back and forth.

    I was being serious about your post, on a recent fire I removed the banister post because like you said to ease egress. My battalion asked me why I removed the posts and where I had learned it? I told him from a old truckie and then I told him why, he was a little impressed.
    So thanks again.

    I would also like to add that any of you smoke eaters out there keep posting, we have a retired FDNY chief that retired in the area, we asked him in all of his years what has been the greatest invention in the fire service? His reply "SCBA" he started in 1921 and retired in 1962 and past away several years ago. He also said that he had to buy his own helmet the cost was 25$ a months pay. Sure have come along way.

  4. #124
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    how about basic free stuff you can throw in your gear. For instance, a golf ball or two for venting those windows that need to go now and can't be reached. Golf tee's for taking care of those small leaks, and a big bertha driver in the cab so when things get slow you can work on your game! I keep small wedges for sprinkler heads that are made out of scrap from strapping. I also keep a couple larger wedges from like 2 by 4 scraps these work great for chocking doors open plus there are literally hundreds of them at most work sites so you can leave in the building and not worry about losing money. Door markers, those plastic door hangers. Webbing, extra flashlight, medical gloves in film containers so they dont get wet or whatever. Finally plastic Zip-ties and a window punch. This sounds like a lot but it weighs almost nothing and is kept in my jacket. I am sure im missing some stuff. Most of this stuff i learned to keep either through trainings or just me getting frustrated on a scene. Im sure someone already said it but a inflatable ball in pump compartment works great when drafting in shallow water, stops the suction funnel from prevent you from getting good draft.

  5. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by PFDTruck18
    To answer your question, we keep our hydrant bags in the compartment directly to the rear of the pump panel. Makes it easy for the driver to grab after he drops the tank and heads to the rear to stretch a supply line.
    On my old department,we'd keep a set of tools in the engineer's compartment (same place yours is described as being,left side,No.1 compartment)and the hydrant bag strapped to a 6' loop of 5" line in the hosebed.Either way,if they're needed everyone knows where a set is and the hydrant guy can pull the line and be able to dress the hydrant as soon as he gets to it.
    In it is a threaded Storz adapter,a 2 1/2" gate valve and of course a hydrant wrench.

  6. #126
    Forum Member Lewiston2FF's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by doughesson
    On my old department,we'd keep a set of tools in the engineer's compartment (same place yours is described as being,left side,No.1 compartment)and the hydrant bag strapped to a 6' loop of 5" line in the hosebed.Either way,if they're needed everyone knows where a set is and the hydrant guy can pull the line and be able to dress the hydrant as soon as he gets to it.
    In it is a threaded Storz adapter,a 2 1/2" gate valve and of course a hydrant wrench.
    I would put a rubber mallet or a bowling pin in there to tighten down the threaded to stortz adapter.
    Shawn M. Cecula
    Firefighter
    IACOJ Division of Fire and EMS

  7. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by NDeMarse View Post
    Nice thread Vinnie. This should be good!

    I can go on all day on stuff like this!

    - When operating any line as a nozzle FF keep the nozzle out in front of you at least 3 feet. It should be just in reach so you can operate the bale of the nozzle. This makes it easier to operate the line. It is easier to bend the nozzle around a corner to hit fire or if there is fire over your head you don't have to do a triple lindy backflip to hit it. Just point and aim and it goes out.

    - Do yourself and your company a favor and saw off the pistol grip so you don't get stuck with the nozzle in your chest and unable to operate it without wrestling the line and overworking yourself.


    - When adding a length to a short-stretch or preconnect (remember preconnects can't hit everything) ALWAYS add it from the supply (engine or stand-pipe) side. It is much faster and easier to add it when done this way. It is usually the Engine Chauffeur that is adding it anyway, and that is his position.

    - ALWAYS FLUSH THE HYDRANT OR STAND-PIPE. THIS ISN'T A TIP, IT'S A MUST, BUT YET FFs STILL DON'T DO IT! Why hook up if you don't know if it is going to work?

    - If operating with no backup FF. Situate yourself on a wall before you open the line. Let the nozzle reaction be absorbed by the wall.

    - If operating with no backup FF. Put a knee on the hose line about 5 feet back from the nozzle before you open the nozzle. The nozzle reaction should be transmitted to the floor.

    - When washing down. Whoever is overhaulling, have them pull ALL of the ceilings and ALL of the walls that need to be pulled. Then have them LEAVE the room. Move to one corner of the room and operate the line soaking all of the area that needs to be covered. Shut down the line, and move to the opposite corner and do the same thing. Move on to the next room and do the same until overhaul is complete. This doesn't allow any part of the opened up area to not be touched by water.

    - In hallways, to avoid cluttering make large loops of hose on the wall (about 5'-6' high) right outside the fire apartment on the opposite wall. Gravity will allow the hose to feed to the nozzle team. When the loops start to go away, feed more hose to the loop or make another one.

    - If you are operating with a solid stream (smooth-bore) line and need to perform hydraulic ventilation. Spin off the outside tip (AND PUT IT IN YOUR POCKET), move to a window and crack the nozzle 1/2 way. It is not as effecient as a fog nozzle for hydraulic ventilation but it works great. You can also leave the tip on and crack the nozzle 1/2 way and that works too. I personally don't like fog nozzles for interior fire attack, and most advocates of fog nozzles use the "well I can't vent with a solid stream nozzle!" Throw this at them and see what they say. Like I said, it takes a little longer, but we are in a slow-down situation at that point. There is no need to "hurry up and get the smoke out of here" once you have it knocked down.

    - If operating as the back-up FF. Get right on the nozzle FFs back. There should be NO space between you and the nozzle FF. When the line is open there should be constant pressure on the nozzle FF so that the only thing that they are doing is pointing the stream. I have seen a backup FF up to 5' behind the nozzle FF. You are doing no good to anyone there. The back-up FF should also be giving the nozzle FF positive encouragement. Phrases like "keep going", "good job", "keep moving in" do A TON for a new or even the experienced firefighter in a fire. Remember, you are there to back them up physically and mentally!

    I'll throw more down later!
    ^^^I love this old thread! been enjoying reading some of the tips and tricks getting passed along.

    Fyredup disagreed a little while ago in one of my threads about the "bolded part" of the above quote. Very cool to read some additional feedback on this and see it resonated by another poster.

    What are some other tricks youse all have learned on the job? pass it on... hope to hear some additional stuff, and see a good thread like this continue on.

  8. #128
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    do your company a favor and get a nozzle with a pistol grip. The handle is very useful.

  9. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by NDeMarse View Post
    Nice thread Vinnie. This should be good!

    I can go on all day on stuff like this!

    - When operating any line as a nozzle FF keep the nozzle out in front of you at least 3 feet. It should be just in reach so you can operate the bale of the nozzle. This makes it easier to operate the line. It is easier to bend the nozzle around a corner to hit fire or if there is fire over your head you don't have to do a triple lindy backflip to hit it. Just point and aim and it goes out
    lol nameless, your humor is appreciated.

    a good video which is done by the superb Lt. McCormack can be found here:http://bcove.me/fa6kuk1b (link is safe and can be found on urbanff: http://www.urbanfirefighter.com/index.html)

    It deals with the "bolded part" of the above quote.....creating a "bow" to reach the stream behind yourself.

  10. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by VinnieB View Post
    2) The 2.5" again.....the scenerio is that you HAVE to make a very quick push to help effect rescue of trapped members.......anyone who has actually operated a 2.5" in real fire knows how much of a BIT*H it is.....(especially basements, cellars, and subcellars ).....anyway..back on track,,,,,,
    What we do is....operate the line...crack it down, stand up to a crouch, grab the bail, and PUSH IN by RUNNING A few feet....get back into the crouch, operate, and repeat the advance......until you make the objective. If you get burned...(and you probably will.....but you got the water), no matter, it means you did what was neccessary to make sure your brothers go home ot kiss thier sweethearts that night.......this is a TRYED and TRUE tactic.....and basically...its the JOB....
    ^^^Ah yes, the pin and hit! http://link.brightcove.com/services/...id=19409724001

    ^^^here's another video demonstration, which will show the "pin and hit" in practice.

  11. #131
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
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    Firehouse_Chick,

    Frankly, you are NOT a firefighter. You have never crawled down a hallway to face a fire. You have never used a hoseline, let alone any type of nozzle in actual real world fire combat. All of your posts are thusly reduced to the equivalent of "Well, this one time at band camp."

    Further your stupid, childish need to mention me because you managed to find someone, who unlike you, is really a firefighter, that disagrees with me about pistols grip nozzles shows what a complete troll you are. You are here for one reason and one reason only. Your 15 minutes of fame.

    By the way, we do pin and hit with 2 inch hose, half the weight of 2 1/2 and we actually have the ability to flow 60 gpms more than the standard FDNY smoothbore nozzle because we use 1 1/4 inch smoothbores instead of the 1 1/8 tip that the FDNY uses.

    You are absolutely hysterical. You have ZERO personal experience or knowledge. You have been fed a bunch of absolute FDNY propaganda by your brother. Then because of some hero worship thing you have going you have to search out the internet to find that one video, or quote, that you believe makes you right. Pathetic. Come back in 5 years or so, if you actually ever make it onto a fire department, and tell us YOUR OWN experiences. Just because some one told you something, or you saw it in a video, or you read it, doesn't make it your experience and that is why you get so little respect here.

    Have a nice day.
    Last edited by FyredUp; 01-13-2011 at 06:06 PM.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
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    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  12. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp View Post
    Firehouse_Chick,

    Frankly, you are NOT a firefighter. You have never crawled down a hallway to face a fire. You have never used a hoseline, let alone any type of nozzle in actual real world fire combat.
    I'd agreed with that when it first started posting. but seeing it's posts after a while, I'd have to agree with Ken and Bull.... this poster knows way too much. I wouldn't hesitate to guess it's someone on the job with a lil bit of a twisted sense of humor (of course we've never seen that lol).

    and Fyred, the 2 inch line seems to be catching on btw. not a whole lot I don't like about it. very good thread, would be nice to see it live on.

  13. #133
    Forum Member L-Webb's Avatar
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    Hey rook, ever held onto a 1.75 flowing over 250gpm? Ever use a 2.5 flowing over 400 gpm? Ever fogged a room and contents to see the beauty of how well proper use of a fog nozzle can be? nah
    Bring enough hose.

  14. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by nbfcfireman View Post
    Dont agree with thing. dont car what you use but a sawsall, sawzall will put fine particulate glass into the air. Dont want to be breathing that. Personally I like a windshield hand saw.
    WON'T if you use the RIGHT blade. Makes no more dust than a glassmaster.

  15. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by NDeMarse View Post
    Nice thread Vinnie. This should be good!

    I can go on all day on stuff like this!

    - When operating any line as a nozzle FF keep the nozzle out in front of you at least 3 feet. It should be just in reach so you can operate the bale of the nozzle. This makes it easier to operate the line. It is easier to bend the nozzle around a corner to hit fire or if there is fire over your head you don't have to do a triple lindy backflip to hit it. Just point and aim and it goes out.

    - Do yourself and your company a favor and saw off the pistol grip so you don't get stuck with the nozzle in your chest and unable to operate it without wrestling the line and overworking yourself.

    - When adding a length to a short-stretch or preconnect (remember preconnects can't hit everything) ALWAYS add it from the supply (engine or stand-pipe) side. It is much faster and easier to add it when done this way. It is usually the Engine Chauffeur that is adding it anyway, and that is his position.

    - ALWAYS FLUSH THE HYDRANT OR STAND-PIPE. THIS ISN'T A TIP, IT'S A MUST, BUT YET FFs STILL DON'T DO IT! Why hook up if you don't know if it is going to work?

    - If operating with no backup FF. Situate yourself on a wall before you open the line. Let the nozzle reaction be absorbed by the wall.

    - If operating with no backup FF. Put a knee on the hose line about 5 feet back from the nozzle before you open the nozzle. The nozzle reaction should be transmitted to the floor.

    - When washing down. Whoever is overhaulling, have them pull ALL of the ceilings and ALL of the walls that need to be pulled. Then have them LEAVE the room. Move to one corner of the room and operate the line soaking all of the area that needs to be covered. Shut down the line, and move to the opposite corner and do the same thing. Move on to the next room and do the same until overhaul is complete. This doesn't allow any part of the opened up area to not be touched by water.

    - In hallways, to avoid cluttering make large loops of hose on the wall (about 5'-6' high) right outside the fire apartment on the opposite wall. Gravity will allow the hose to feed to the nozzle team. When the loops start to go away, feed more hose to the loop or make another one.

    - If you are operating with a solid stream (smooth-bore) line and need to perform hydraulic ventilation. Spin off the outside tip (AND PUT IT IN YOUR POCKET), move to a window and crack the nozzle 1/2 way. It is not as effecient as a fog nozzle for hydraulic ventilation but it works great. You can also leave the tip on and crack the nozzle 1/2 way and that works too. I personally don't like fog nozzles for interior fire attack, and most advocates of fog nozzles use the "well I can't vent with a solid stream nozzle!" Throw this at them and see what they say. Like I said, it takes a little longer, but we are in a slow-down situation at that point. There is no need to "hurry up and get the smoke out of here" once you have it knocked down.

    - If operating as the back-up FF. Get right on the nozzle FFs back. There should be NO space between you and the nozzle FF. When the line is open there should be constant pressure on the nozzle FF so that the only thing that they are doing is pointing the stream. I have seen a backup FF up to 5' behind the nozzle FF. You are doing no good to anyone there. The back-up FF should also be giving the nozzle FF positive encouragement. Phrases like "keep going", "good job", "keep moving in" do A TON for a new or even the experienced firefighter in a fire. Remember, you are there to back them up physically and mentally!

    I'll throw more down later!
    Well,not that I spend much time on the knob anymore but the LAST place I want my B'up "guy" is tucked up my butt. Give me 3 or 4' so I can move the hose around easier. We use pistol grips,have for years but that DOESN'T mean the PG ALWAYS has to be in your hands. You can hold the hose back 2-3' behind the PG and use it the same as a conventional nozzle. Be FAMILIAR with YOUR tools and the best way to use them. T.C.

  16. #136
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NDeMarse View Post
    Nice thread Vinnie. This should be good!

    I can go on all day on stuff like this!

    - When operating any line as a nozzle FF keep the nozzle out in front of you at least 3 feet. It should be just in reach so you can operate the bale of the nozzle. This makes it easier to operate the line. It is easier to bend the nozzle around a corner to hit fire or if there is fire over your head you don't have to do a triple lindy backflip to hit it. Just point and aim and it goes out.

    I totally agree with keeping it out in front of you. 3 feet? If that's what works for you, GROOVY!

    - Do yourself and your company a favor and saw off the pistol grip so you don't get stuck with the nozzle in your chest and unable to operate it without wrestling the line and overworking yourself.

    IF you get the nozzle stuck in your chest the issue isn't the pistol grip, it is either **** poor training or laziness on the nozzle operator's part. Blaming the pistol grip for the bad technique of the nozzle operator is simply ludicrous. I teach firefighters to extend the hoseline in front of them whether they are using a pistol grip nozzle or not. It is very bad technique and a losing battle if you let the nozzle get to close to your body. Both dpeartments I am on utilize pistol grip nozzles and depending on the tactic being used it is not unusual to see the nozzle operator holding the hose back from the nozzle and not the pistol grip.
    - When adding a length to a short-stretch or preconnect (remember preconnects can't hit everything) ALWAYS add it from the supply (engine or stand-pipe) side. It is much faster and easier to add it when done this way. It is usually the Engine Chauffeur that is adding it anyway, and that is his position.

    - If operating with no backup FF. Put a knee on the hose line about 5 feet back from the nozzle before you open the nozzle. The nozzle reaction should be transmitted to the floor.

    I teach this method. I like it because it allows for rapid forwward movement simply by gating the nozzle a bit and sliding your knee off the hose.

    - If you are operating with a solid stream (smooth-bore) line and need to perform hydraulic ventilation. Spin off the outside tip (AND PUT IT IN YOUR POCKET), move to a window and crack the nozzle 1/2 way. It is not as effecient as a fog nozzle for hydraulic ventilation but it works great. You can also leave the tip on and crack the nozzle 1/2 way and that works too. I personally don't like fog nozzles for interior fire attack, and most advocates of fog nozzles use the "well I can't vent with a solid stream nozzle!" Throw this at them and see what they say. Like I said, it takes a little longer, but we are in a slow-down situation at that point. There is no need to "hurry up and get the smoke out of here" once you have it knocked down.

    Sure it works. But if I use a low pressure combo nozzle I can make a stream almost equivalent to a smoothbore AND use a fog pattern for ventilation. Would that work for the FDNY? Probably not in your buildings with debris and rust in your standpipes. We don't have that problem so for us it works just fine.

    By the way, I like smoothbore nozzles too but they are not the answer to everything for everyone.


    - If operating as the back-up FF. Get right on the nozzle FFs back. There should be NO space between you and the nozzle FF. When the line is open there should be constant pressure on the nozzle FF so that the only thing that they are doing is pointing the stream. I have seen a backup FF up to 5' behind the nozzle FF. You are doing no good to anyone there. The back-up FF should also be giving the nozzle FF positive encouragement. Phrases like "keep going", "good job", "keep moving in" do A TON for a new or even the experienced firefighter in a fire. Remember, you are there to back them up physically and mentally!

    Sorry I disagree, if the back up firefighter is doing his job and taking the back pressure there is no need for them to be pushing on the back of the nozzle operator. I have told more than one back up man to get off my *** and give me room to work. Be close when I open the nozzle, but don't be pushing on me, push the hose.

    I'll throw more down later!
    Yeah, yeah, I know this is an old topic.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  17. #137
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdemarse View Post
    And a smooth bore definitely helps too
    Why? Nozzle pressure? Would it be different if the same flow came from a 50 psi combo nozzle?
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  18. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by tny1771 View Post
    very good thread, would be nice to see it live on.
    totally agree! This single thread has more useful information in it than 90% of the crap posted lately. Tons of good tips for those of us that haven't been around in the fire service very long.

    Even if some disagree with the tips, it's just nice to have options on the fireground. Some of the ways that a pickhead could be used mentioned at the begining of the thread, I'd never heard before. Does that mean that I'm gonna use them? Not necessarily, but I like keeping them somewhere in the ol' noodle in case they might prove useful someday.

    I'd be a shame if it turned into a "your way's stupid" thread.

  19. #139
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    While there is great information in this thread, I find it more interesting to see how the posters interacted with each other. Not nearly of a confrontational tone between posters as is common now. This must have been the "good old days" you always hear about.

  20. #140
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    Cool TIC Use

    Use the TIC to tell the fluid levels in a container (for you HazMat Fellas)... Different levels and different fluids absorb more or less heat.

    Use your TIC to tell when Interior Conditions are changing; most TICs switch the way they are operating (can't think of the technical name here) at approximately 350 degree F. If you're scanning and don't see it stall then chances are it's less than that. If you're scanning and notice the screen stops and then looks a bit different then it's changed how it's sending the information and is probably over 350 degrees at your level.

    I saw this on another site... If there is no pillar or something solid in the front of the residence and you need a Search Line, use your Halligan and pound it into the ground using the forked ends.

    Use the Halligan on the roof to give you a foot-hold when it's needed to step off the roof ladder on a pitched roof.

    Remember, when using a tool (axe, halligan, pike pole, etc) to improve your reach think about what you are sticking out there and send the handle out. The exception would be the Halligan, send the forked-end out.

    Definitely some good stuff here.....
    "Be LOUD, Be PROUD..... It just might save your can someday when goin' through an intersection!!!!!"

    Life on the Truck (Quint) is good.....

    Eat til you're sleepy..... Sleep til you're hungry..... And repeat.....

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