1. #1
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    Default New words for a city boy - Incident Management Teams

    The new buzz in New York these days are IMT's. I learned first hand in New Orleans what they do and how they help. This is a heads up in case you run into one...

    There are two types of Incident Management Teams (IMTs): Type 1 and Type 2 used to manage large incidents. Some areas have Type 3 IMT's to manage smaller incidents that extend for multiple operational periods. The teams consist of members from federal, state, county and local agencies. Many teams have trainee positions for persons who have not yet met all the training requirements for their position.
    As a general rule, Type 1 National Teams manage large fires and disasters with over 600 people assigned and address the most complex logistical, fiscal, planning, operational and safety issues. Type 2 Teams generally manage less complex fires and disasters, generally less than 500 people, and address less complicated management issues. Both Type 1 and Type 2 teams are managed on a rotational basis through the nine Geographical Areas. While the National Type 1 teams are on rotation throughout the year, Type 2 teams are only activated during the fire season. Nine Geographic Areas (GA) advertise vacancies on teams within their area and select new team members from the nominations received. Vacancies are generally announced through the agencies within the GA, some Geographic Area Coordination Centers (GACC's) have placed recruitment information on their Websites. In addition to the core IMTs, many subordinate positions are required to manage an incident. Dispatch centers will search the Resource Ordering and Status System (ROSS) for available individuals to fill orders placed by the Incident Management Team. These may be Incident Command System positions identified in the Wildland and Prescribed Fire Qualification Guide (310-1) or Technical Specialists.

    Back home in Gotham -- The FDNY's Incident Management Team (IMT) have been assigned in the past to a Type I IMT that have been activated for fires and disasters thoughout the US. They have been involved in the planning, safety and management of multi-agency resources firefighters battling the fire and disasters on the frontlines. The FDNY is the only structural firefighting team in the country with the training and capability to be assigned and activated to this type emergency incident.
    Since 2003, more than 150 Department members have received extensive classroom and field training from federal instructors in utilizing IMTís to manage large-scale, long-duration disasters. That same year, members received hands-on training at major forest fire sites in the Western states. FDNY members are also specifically trained to handle the management and logistics of large-scale disasters in urban environments. The development of the IMTís and training on the Incident Command System is an outgrowth of the Fire Departmentís Strategic Plan created in the aftermath of September 11, 2001.
    Last edited by E40FDNYL35; 10-06-2005 at 08:02 PM.
    ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
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    LT. John Ginley Engine 40
    FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
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    Bewdy! We're always struggling for more IMT-trained staff when we have our big wildfires down here in Australia, which judging by the weather conditions could start as soon as this weekend - get your bags packed Ray I'll make sure that you guys are added to the rescource list. Told you I'd meet up with you one day.

    In all seriousness when the brown stuff hits the fan big time down here (like it did two years ago) we simply don't have enough IMT personnel, so we extra help flown in from several countries. That fire we had one IMT running for nearly 3 months 24/7
    Last edited by stillPSFB; 10-07-2005 at 12:08 AM.
    Busy polishing the stacked tips on the deckgun of I.A.C.O.J. Engine#1

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    Quote Originally Posted by stillPSFB
    .........get your bags packed Ray I'll make sure that you guys are added to the rescource list. Told you I'd meet up with you one day.
    In all seriousness I'm ready.....
    ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
    NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
    343
    CAPT. Frank Callahan Ladder 35 *
    LT. John Ginley Engine 40
    FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
    FF. Jimmy Giberson Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Otten Ladder 35 *
    FF. Steve Mercado Engine 40 *
    FF. Kevin Bracken Engine 40 *
    FF. Vincent Morello Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Roberts Ladder 35 *
    FF. Michael Lynch Engine 40
    FF. Michael Dauria Engine 40

    Charleston 9
    "If my job was easy a cop would be doing it."
    *******************CLICK HERE*****************

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    Ray keep an eye on the news - if things go really pear-shaped again here this summer I'll have a whisper in a certain ear that I know and we'll see if we can get you guys out here. It would be great to have you guys down here - and the after-fire party would be huge
    Busy polishing the stacked tips on the deckgun of I.A.C.O.J. Engine#1

    ...and before you ask - YES I have done a Bloody SEARCH!

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    Is this an outgrowth of a "command box" which I read about a few years ago in a fire service trade magazine? As I remember it, it was setup within a large mutual aid system in the midwest, and it was designed to bring in extra command/safety/public information staffing in the event of a large fire/incident that overwhelmed the "home town" command structure and was designed for use on everyday incidents. At the time it seemed like a good idea, as often the ststem can be overwhelmed.

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    He isnt joking either, this weekend has the potential to be devestating up here. So far so good though.

    The QFRS is just starting to get these IMTs done right now. Our fire shed has been designated as the temporary control centre for the whole of the gold coast because of its position. During a big hazard reduction burn we set up an IMT for practice, and it worked really well. We got the State Emergency Service, the Police, etc... in on it. Although the police actually were needed for real to keep the crowds away from the helicopter refilling point.

    (for you yanks, the SES is a volunteer service that does rescue, searching for missing people in bushland, helping out in storms and most importantly, providing food and water for the rural fire brigades in major fires )
    "There are only two things that i know are infinite, the universe and human stupidity. And im not so sure about the former."

    For all the life of me, i cant see a firefighter going to hell. At least not for very long. We would end up putting out all the fires and annoying the devil too much.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PattyV
    the SES is a volunteer service that.... most importantly, providing food and water for the rural fire brigades in major fires )
    I knew that we'd eventually find a good reason for their existance.
    Busy polishing the stacked tips on the deckgun of I.A.C.O.J. Engine#1

    ...and before you ask - YES I have done a Bloody SEARCH!

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    Quote Originally Posted by LaFireEducator
    Is this an outgrowth of a "command box" which I read about a few years ago in a fire service trade magazine? As I remember it, it was setup within a large mutual aid system in the midwest, and it was designed to bring in extra command/safety/public information staffing in the event of a large fire/incident that overwhelmed the "home town" command structure and was designed for use on everyday incidents. At the time it seemed like a good idea, as often the ststem can be overwhelmed.
    Down here when the fires get big the IMT's get big as well (which I guess is logical). I remember walking into an IMT HQ looking for "Logistics" because I had been given a copy of a map that hadn't copied real well and I needed a new one in a hurry - there must have been a staff of at least 75 in this IMT at the time, and I only saw two rooms of them.
    Busy polishing the stacked tips on the deckgun of I.A.C.O.J. Engine#1

    ...and before you ask - YES I have done a Bloody SEARCH!

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    It is my understanding that NYC IMT needed a large scale drill to be "qualified" by the Feds and NOLA was it, up to that point the team was in training and development.

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    Default NYC Firefighters Get Wilderness Disaster Training

    July 27, 2006 -- Five New York City firefighters have traded skyscrapers and subways for pine trees and canoes as they learn about big-time disaster management from an elite team of wildfire experts in the north woods of Minnesota. They hope their training in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness will help them effectively manage the worst type of disasters back home. ``It's an eye-opening experience,'' said Capt. Patrick Cleary, commanding officer of Engine Company 59 in Harlem. ``I've seen a different management style. ... I've seen people come together from all different agencies from all different areas, and it works.'' Pairing forest experts with big-city firefighters may seem odd, but officials say the matchup makes sense. Wildfire experts have been using an ``incident command system'' for years to respond to large-scale disasters and situations involving multiple agencies and complicated logistics. Members of the wildland fire community took their skills to New York after the 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. One team helped coordinate the city's response, while another team, currently in the Boundary Waters, worked on supplies. ``They filled a void,'' said New York Deputy Chief Bob Maynes. ``In standard New York City emergencies, there's probably nobody better'' than the city's firefighters, he said. ``But once the Trade Center happened, it was something we weren't used to. ... We had a deficiency in multi-operational, very complex operations.'' A 2002 report that examined the response to the World Trade Center attacks recommended the Fire Department develop its own incident management team, specifically focused on urban terrorism. An agreement was set up to begin training with the wildland fire community, Maynes said. Training started in 2003 and is ongoing, Maynes said. In addition to the five firefighters in Minnesota, seven are currently in Oregon and two were just returning from Arizona, he said. The department now has its own Incident Management Team, which was deployed to New Orleans to assist officials after Hurricane Katrina. And Maynes said the lessons learned in the deep woods could benefit every major city. ``In New York, we expect another attack sooner or later,'' Maynes said. ``We do see this as a glaring need nationally. There are attempts for us to help train (people in) other urban areas.'' In Minnesota, Cleary and his colleagues are shadowing members of the Pacific Northwest National Incident Management Team 2. This team is one of 17 national teams with that high-level of expertise in managing complex disasters. Besides wildfires and the terrorist attacks, this team has also responded to Hurricane Rita and to the explosion of the space shuttle Columbia. Cleary, who has been a firefighter for more than 15 years, is training with the public information officers on the expert team. ``There's a reason why New York City sent five of us here,'' he said. ``These guys are the best at what they do.'' When he arrived to the Boundary Waters Canoe Area, which spans about 1,500 square miles along the Canadian border and holds hundreds of lakes and rivers, Cleary said he was overwhelmed to see the operation at work. The incident management team had set up ``a little city, and everything they need to support this operation to put this fire out is here,'' he said. ``It's hard to imagine that they can get this much done this quickly, but they are the best.'' The fire began July 14 with a lightning strike, and quickly multiplied in size due to weather conditions and because the fire happened in the ``blowdown area,'' an area hundreds of thousands of acres wide that contains trees that had been toppled in a 1999 storm. Those millions of trees have been drying out on the ground ever since, creating perfect kindling for an intense fire. In recent days, the fire had been 45 percent contained, and had only spread to about 50 square miles, including 39 square miles of land. As part of his training, Cleary hosted an information meeting for local residents and business owners. The situation was different from what he's used to, but he said it went well, and the public wants to be informed. ``I think they were just amused by my accent,'' he joked. ``Honestly, New York City firemen will get anything done at any time,'' said Cleary. ``What these guys provide is a system for getting things done more efficiently in the long run. ... Everyone has a job. There are no egos. You are here for a team.'' He's anxious to share what he's learning with his colleagues. And as for the Boundary Waters: ``It's been a great experience. It's been a beautiful country, and I'd like to come back and visit with my family someday.''
    ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
    NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
    343
    CAPT. Frank Callahan Ladder 35 *
    LT. John Ginley Engine 40
    FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
    FF. Jimmy Giberson Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Otten Ladder 35 *
    FF. Steve Mercado Engine 40 *
    FF. Kevin Bracken Engine 40 *
    FF. Vincent Morello Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Roberts Ladder 35 *
    FF. Michael Lynch Engine 40
    FF. Michael Dauria Engine 40

    Charleston 9
    "If my job was easy a cop would be doing it."
    *******************CLICK HERE*****************

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    LA...basically same idea as Command Box, but came out of the wildland fire guys.

    Call it what you want, it's a good concept. I'd even trace similiar ideas like County Mutual Coordinators which in my area for a time from the 1950s-1980s filled a similiar role of helping off load some of the duties from the OIC for major incidents. While certainly not an IMT, for major incidents my dispatch center will now send an Incident Dispatcher to the scene (called in on overtime) -- instead of the OIC talking by radio or phone to the dispatch center, he can communicate face-to-face to a dispatcher who then can then relay more succintent information to the dispatch center.

    Lack of overhead (managers) to manage an incident is very much overlooked in the fire service because of the usually more pressing lack of indians.

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    Come to California right now. We will give you all of the IMT and ICS you can handle. The whole state is on fire and we have ICs, ST (strike teams) and TFs (task force) everywhere.

    See...

    http://cdfdata.fire.ca.gov/incidents/incidents_current
    Last edited by CALFFBOU; 07-28-2006 at 02:43 AM.

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    Thumbs up Well............

    I can't help but think the ones from New York that really should be training with the big IMTs are those few (Upper Management??) members of the FD and PD that keep the pot stirred at home. Just think - People from different agencies WORKING TOGETHER!! Wow.............

    And a tip 'O the Helment to those hundreds of guys and gals out on the street every day, working together, in spite of management.
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    Quote Originally Posted by E40FDNYL35
    The FDNY is the only structural firefighting team in the country with the training and capability to be assigned and activated to this type emergency incident.


    Brian
    Please no e-mail. Public replies only. Thank you!

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    Welcome FDNY to all hazard emergency managment.

    I would wadger that a trip to Montana or a surrounding state will be in order this summer, the wildfire seson is going to be a cooker.

    To make you feel right at home I will see if I can get Senator Conrad Burns to yell at you and berate you after you demob your first big Montana fire.

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    We just had an engine come back from a strike team assignment. They were on the Foster Gulch Complex fire in Oregon. 6 FDNY firefighters were also there training with the PNW 3 Type 1 Management Team.

    Hells Canyon in July, they got plenty of training

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    Quote Originally Posted by kd7fds
    We just had an engine come back from a strike team assignment. They were on the Foster Gulch Complex fire in Oregon. 6 FDNY firefighters were also there training with the PNW 3 Type 1 Management Team.

    Hells Canyon in July, they got plenty of training
    I bet its hot as hell out there in the wilds digging hotline with a leather lid and black bunkers...
    -Brotherhood: I don't know half of you half as well as I should like; and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve.
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    FYI I found a press release on Inciweb with the names and stations of the FDNY guys in Oregon.

    http://www.inciweb.org/incident/news/article/355/959/

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