1. #1
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    Default Hi Guys !! I'm looking for some advice...

    Hi everyone,
    I'm a seventeen year old juinor firefighter in georgia. I came here to find some advice to help me with some things i've seen that i'm having some trouble with. Anyone with experience or just good with talking and advice would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks,
    lightmeupGA

  2. #2
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    allineedisu's Avatar
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    Exclamation

    I guess it all depends on what you want to know.

    I can tell you a lot about the fire service and its operations.

    If you are in school now, stay there, get a good education. Go to college if you can and earn a degree.

    I can also tell you a lot about women!

    Politics and religion, you are on your own!
    OUTSTANDING

    Make It Happen

    Never forget 9-11-2001
    343 Brothers Who Were MURDERED!!

  3. #3
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    Default Hello

    Hi and Welcome from New Jersey,

    Ask away, we're here to help!
    Gods Speed to our Troops!

    If you can't stand the heat, Get out of my way !!!
    MEMBER OF I.A.C.O.J.

  4. #4
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    The best way to get any answer is to never be afraid to ask a question. And that goes double in the fire service. Because if you dont ask it you may end up dead. !!

    Stay safe
    Fire chief

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    Well the question i had was about a call i went to last week. I hope this is this the right place to post it.
    I've talked to another firefighter about it but it didn't really help, and my cheif doesn't come across as being someone easy to talk to. Well what happened was at about 12:30 am someone fell asleep and crossed the center line. There were five critically wounded patients. All five needed to be lifeflighted out but the choppers wouldn't fly through the rain. Three of these died including the patient i was working with. He was thrown from the back seat through the windsheild and had sustained a broken back among other injuries. I have gone to a fatal wreck before, but nothing like this. I keep seeing him lying there on the ground with blood everywhere and nothing i could do.
    Any advice from you more experienced ones ??

  6. #6
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    Default

    Welcome LMU...

    *post edited cos it sounded stupid*

    Have a good time here.. I only just joined & I am picking up loads... BE THE SPONGE!!!
    Last edited by Proby1711; 10-12-2005 at 03:06 PM.

  7. #7
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    Default Talk, talk, talk

    Critical Incident Stress Debriefing probably was inorder. You must remember that what you did was all you could do. You didnt cause the accident, you didnt cause the weather, you gave these patients any chance they had. Does the county you work in have a CISD team? If they do, get in contact with them and just talk.

  8. #8
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    Hello, The first thing that i will say might offend you but it is from personal experience. I started out as a junior firefighter along time ago and the one thing that i was always told and i didn;t always agree with them, that i was still a minor by law and that i might not be ready to see somthing like that. The rule at my station is no junior firefighters are to be on scene of any critical incident. meaning DOA's, overdoses, suscide, and anything else that might be to hard to take. It really sucks for the four years i was a junior but when i got chief i really aggree with it. Ok the second thing i will say is that i would hope that your Chief would be willing to sit down and talk to you about this. Any good Chief officer and or company officer should take the time to sit down and discuss somthing like this to there firefighters. Ok and the third thing, you will never get that image out of your head. I know that seems rough but images like that stick with me always. I remember once a guy left a bar and very heavy drunk. He walked down the road in and out of traffic. And of course you know what happened next he was hit by a car going about 60mph in a 45mph zone. The guy in the car left the scene, and left the guy in the middle of the road to die. When i arrived he was DOA. He was badly broken up. I don't believe there was a bone that wasn;t broken in his body. His face was even deeply impacted in this crash. I remember looking at him and staring. That was almost 10 years ago and i still drive by that spot and remember what happen and what he looked like. There isn't anything wrong with remembering but dwelling on it can cause a problem down the road for you. Take my advice and talk to somone quickly. If you can find anynody at your station this forum is always a good way to find some guys and gals that have been through it.

    Take care
    Fire Chief

  9. #9
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    Default Hi

    This is a tuff one.
    Chief260 has covered most of what
    all of us will tell you. My own mind
    set is that you cant be afriad to talk
    about it. Weather it with your Chief
    or the guys at the station or even
    your mom (yes your mom or dad).
    Burying your feeling of self doubt
    is a very bad thing to do, it will
    just build up inside and usually
    comes out in a negitive way.
    CISD group meeting at the station
    is one of the best way to get everyone
    on the same page. Even some of the old
    tuff vets cant sleep at night. Sadly it does
    get easier as the years go on, most EMS
    workers build a tuff skin (which you need
    to do or it will eat you alive) and it become
    easier to understand that you did all you could do.
    Some times you best isnt good enough,
    God has the final say, not us. You have to
    savor the victories and put the rest behind you
    as soon as you can.

    Talking about it will help the most,
    you might be surprised who else in
    the stations are having the same feelings
    as you are having.

    If their is anything I can do for you
    just give a holler

    Joe
    Gods Speed to our Troops!

    If you can't stand the heat, Get out of my way !!!
    MEMBER OF I.A.C.O.J.

  10. #10
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    wow sounds bad but as all of your critical incidents were you will overcome them but not always forget them but you will learn form them and teach other people from your experincei have been to many critical incidents in my four short years everything from natural cause of death to avalanches to a van full of people getting hit by a fully loaded cattle truck at 65 mph and have over come all of those memories and turned them for the better to help new people or even well seasoned vet of the business stay active and talk to people if you have any trouble and if your dept has not had a cisd debreifing you need to request one they help even if people sound made about it they will benifit from it take care and stay in touch if you need any thing

  11. #11
    55 Years & Still Rolling
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    Smile Well.............

    Chief260 and dfd9 have covered most of the things that I would say. Important thing is, you never create the problem, you just risk your life to fix it. I always drive like I have some common sense, and one time somebody asked why I wasn't going faster after the first unit to arrive started yelling about the BIG Fire that he had. Easy, it wasn't my house, or his. Real point is that if we were going to be able to help, we had to get there alive. The kind of attitude that comes from caring about others, looking out for the brothers and sisters, AND covering your own butt, doesn't come easy. My first Fire was a double fatal, two small kids in an upstairs bedroom, big old frame house. Somebody put gasoline in the kerosene heater, and it blew. First auto accident was a fatal, and about 8 or 9 months later, we ran a Train vs Car accident that killed 9 people. I was 17 at the time, and walked the railroad tracks for a couple of hours, picking up stuff. C.I.S.D wasn't invented yet, but I talked to our Pastor a couple of times about it, and it helped. 46 years later, I still remember more about it than I'd like to, but I know that there was nothing that I could have done to help anyone, beyond what I did. One important thing: Talk to someone, clergy, trusted friend, CISD person, etc. It helps. We're here on the forums, and a lot of messages back and forth from people who truly care is a help, but don't try to go it alone. Best wishes.
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
    In memory of
    Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
    Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

    IACOJ Budget Analyst

    I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

    www.gdvfd18.com

  12. #12
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    Dude you want in the ff service for life, do you love it now join the airforce and make sure they put it in writing that you will be a firefighter. These guys give you the best and quickest education and experience. If you want to be a man join the corps and beg to be (MOS 7051) Crash crew. Do it this way and you will have a federal job waiting for you in 4 years that is after you have grown a set of balls. OOHRAH!!

  13. #13
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    Default

    I'm an explorer/junior on my department. My dad is in charge of the explorers even though we have captains and lou's. I know all of the guys and have for the last 5 years. They would never let me onto a scene as you saw until they knew I was ready.
    I understand your hesitation to talk to the chief. Being under the probes is like being an 8th grader in high school. Its almost as if you need to prove yourself before you can talk to him... but it is a good idea to talk one on one. He will know how you feel as will any other guy on the department.

    ~Cat

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