1. #1
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    Default Tips for the Rookie/Probie Firefighter...

    First- I did NOT write this. I got it from another site and final got to post it here. I suggest copying it, printing it and keep it for future use.
    Enjoy, Bou.

    1. Always have at least one pen on you at all times. You can't go wrong getting on of the pens and clipping it to your t-shirt collar. You'll need a pen for writing down information on calls and for taking notes. Nothing more embarrassing than having to ask someone to borrow a pen.

    2. Always have a watch with a second hand and one that glows in the dark. Besides needing it for taking vital signs once you're on the line, it is not a nice-to-have, but a need-to-have. You'll never know when you will need it, but if you don't have one, it is pretty embarrassing having to tell the person asking you to time something or what time is it, "I don't have a watch." Go to Costco (or a similar store) and buy a heavy duty, waterproof watch. I still have the same one that I bought in my academy 10 years ago, it works great.

    3. Be nice to EVERY ONE you meet, whether they are in uniform or not. You never know who they might be and its just the right thing to do.

    4. Start learning the names and positions/assignments of all of the chiefs, all of the officers and all of the firefighters that work in your new department. Why? Because it is the right thing to do and because you'll need to know them at some point anyway, why not start now? The sooner you start, the easier it will be, especially in larger departments. If you get hired by say LAFD, with over 3,000 members, good luck. Do the best you can. Also start learning the names of the administrative personnel (secretaries, etc.) that you come in contact with during training, the hiring process, etc. They will assist you at some point in your career; start learning who they are, what they do, and how they can help you.

    7. A good way to do number 6 above is to get a hold of a fire department yearbook (if that department has produced one) or some other document with pictures on it.

    8. If you meet someone new for the first time (and there will be a lot of first times - you'll feel like an Alzheimer's patient for a while), take the time to extend your hand, shake their hand, and say something to the effect of "hello, my name is John Smith, I am one of the new probationary firefighters (or whatever your dept. calls you), I am pleased to meet you." Hopefully they will provide their name, if they don't, try to tactfully ask that question and then throw in something to the effect of "where do you work and what is your assignment." Some people might call that kissing butt, I think it is just common courtesy. Realize every department is different and this may not be accepted practice in some departments.

    9. Realize that you will not have much (if any) available sick or vacation time. That said; try to keep the hobbies to a minimum that might injure you (skiing, motorcycling, snowboarding, etc.). If you don't have the time to use as sick leave, there is no requirement they have to keep your job. Wait the 12 to 18 months for probation to finish if you do something that has a high risk of injury.

    Also, try not to plan any big trips. You won't have much vacation and some departments don't even allow trades or minimize trades for probes. In some departments, it is frowned upon for probes to take trades. Know your departments culture.

    10. Learn as much as you can about your new department. Besides learning the names and ranks of personnel, learn about the history and about every possible thing you can. This information can be found out primarily just by showing interest and talking with the firefighters you work with. Most will love to talk about the history with you. Other good sources include department history books, yearbooks, the internet, a fire dept. museum (if they have one), each fire station itself, etc.

    It seems to me that many probes don't seem to care about the history (or at least they don't seem aggressive in learning about the history) of a dept. these days. History is there for a reason - we can learn from history and it also helps you talk with and understand people since history is contained every day in our conversations in some form or fashion.

    11. If it is appropriate in your dept., try to attend EVERY department function. These can include: Holiday parties, union meetings, barbeques, recognition dinners, retirement dinners, etc. This is a great way to meet more of the personnel you have not yet met, to meet some of the retirees, to learn more about how the department operates, and to just be more involved to your department.

    12. When appropriate, get involved. Many departments don't allow (or like) probes to get involved on committees, etc., but that doesn't mean you can't start learning about the different committees so you can start planting the seeds for when you get off probation. We are all looking for our members to get involved in some form or fashion.

    13. Always have a full set of spare street clothes in your car, as well as numerous pieces of dept. clothing. When I got hired, I purchased 10 t-shirts and 2 to 3 each of sweat shirts, sweat pants, sweat shorts, etc. You're going to get stinky and dirty, and you'll want a clean change of clothes since you might not be able to launder your clothes every night after the academy.

    14. While you're driving to the academy each day, and going to lunch with your classmates (assuming your dept. allows that), don't drive with your blinders on. Start learning the streets, the target hazards, etc. What a great way to start learning your way around town. On that note, try to spend your money (food, gas, snacks, etc.) in the dept.'s jurisdiction. Besides having the money go back to the city (that you'll indirectly benefit from in the long run), you'll get to learn the areas. This will come in handy.

    15. On the same lines of number 14, buy a street map of your new dept.'s jurisdictional boundaries. Mark each fire station on the map and include the assigned apparatus. What a great way to learn where each fire station is and what units are assigned to each station. This will be a necessity. The last thing you want to do is get your station assignment and say "can you tell me how to get there?" That doesn't make you look to good.

    Also, take the time to highlight each main target hazard (schools, hospitals, shopping centers, large companies, major transit centers, city buildings, etc.). Besides having to respond to them on calls, you'll probably be tested on them as well.

    Additionally, highlight the primary streets so you can start memorizing them. Then do the secondary streets, etc.

    Keep this map with you at all times and then with you when you work at the stations to study.

    16. Learn the address of each station (if you're hired by LAFD, good luck). This will teach you basic address schemes (such as odd numbers are on the north and east side of the street and even numbers are on the south and the west side of the street) of the city and will start you learning your streets (which most departments require and test you on). Once you learn the street name, learn the cross street as well. And then which way the numbers progress on the street.

    Remember that it is tough to learn everything all at once. However, if you start small, at the time you get hired, and then think of it as "building blocks," you'll be surprised at how much you will learn and retain.

    17. Always have spare money with you in case you forget your wallet. Try to keep a bunch of coins in your car, and also some small bills (in case you forget your wallet and need food, bridge toll, etc.). Go a step further and put some coins and money in a water tight container and carry it on your turnouts. This will be good once you get on line and are coming back from a 5 am run and you have just had your first trash fire and the captain tells you, "oh, your first trash fire? Perfect, you can buy us donuts." Instead of saying "can I borrow some money, my wallet is at the station?" You can say, no problem, I have money in my turnouts.

    18. If you have extra uniforms, keep at least one shirt/pants in your vehicle in a secure space. Chances are you'll get the one you're wearing dirty at some point and need a clean set. Don't keep them visible because some thief would love to get their hands on it....

    19. Always have a toiletries kit in your vehicle. I remember one probie asking me (when he was working at the station), "Cap, can I borrow your deodorant since I forgot mine?" I prefer the roll on deodorant and what do you think my answer was? NO!!! That's almost as bad as asking to borrow a toothbrush or towels.

    20. Last, but not least (at least for now), if you are issued a probie binder to get things signed off in, make copies of it on a regular basis. One of our probes lost (actually his car was broken into and they took the book and some turnouts) his book a couple of years ago - the one that had almost 18 months of probie sign-offs completed. He did not have a copy in a secure location. He was dancing around for a while and quite nervous until he was told it was ok. This could have easily gone against him.

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    Default Another...

    Congratulations and welcome to the American Fire Service!



    1)-Don't wait to be told to get things done around the station. If your
    day slows down and your officer is preoccupied, there's a long list of
    station maintenance always available to you. Wash blue rags, change roll
    towels, organize what's disorganized, clean what's dirty.

    2)-Along the same lines, if you see something in the station that is
    obviously wrong, fix it. Something that needs to be put away, or picked
    up, or repaired. Don't wait for someone else to do it, or wait for an
    officer to tell you to do it. Take pride in making the buck stop with
    you.

    3)-You will have many questions during your first year. A good habit
    to get into when you have a question is follow the chain of
    command-starting with yourself. Do the research yourself first, then
    ask a senior firefighter, then your driver, and only then, your officer.
    Don't get me wrong-most folks are happy to answer questions, but this
    is a good habit to get into.

    4)-If you have thin skin, thicken it. Sarcasm is the breakfast of
    champions in the firehouse.

    5)-If you can't cook, learn.

    6)-Even if you see other firefighters doing otherwise, address officers
    by rank and last name until they personally instruct you to do
    otherwise. Even then, remember that addressing an officer by last name
    and rank is a sign of respect…need I say more?

    7)-When the rig is backing up, only the officer and driver should be on
    board. Only one firefighter should be in contact with the driver as the
    rig backs up, but the second and third firefighters can act as another
    set of eyes.

    8)-If you can't find your sheets and pillow-case in the morning, look
    in the freezer. You forgot to take them off the bed your last shift and
    they're frozen into a bucket of water.

    9)-Every interaction you have with the public, no matter how small, is
    a chance for public education and relations. To a little kid, you are
    practically a movie star. Know where stickers and handouts are on your
    rig-or carry some with you on inspections or grocery trips.

    10)-Always leave things the way you found them. (Does not include
    broken or dirty) Locked, Closed, Ready to use, for example.

    11)-When you go the city garage for fuel, don't sit on the rig and
    wait. Get out and be ready with the nozzle in the fuel tank as the
    driver gets out.

    12)-All of the above may have you wondering about all this info…! This
    brings me to a theory I've developed. There are unfortunately only two
    types of probies in the eyes of many senior firefighters:
    "Suck-up/Brown-nosers" or "Cocky Mouth-offs." It may sound like you
    lose either way in this situation, however, here's my take on it. It's
    very bad form get too comfortable in your attitude and start mouthing
    off. On the other hand, if you are consistent in treating everyone with
    respect, you will be labeled a suck up. This is just a test to find out
    what you're about. The difference between a suck-up and a good
    probationary firefighter is motive.


    13)-A probie knows when to be first and when to be last.
    Times to be first:
    Answering the kitchen phone, and, as you settle in to the place,
    any phone.
    Answering to door bell.
    Doing dishes after a meal.
    Helping out in any way.

    Times to be last:
    Serving yourself at a communal meal or ice cream.
    Voicing your opinion.

    14)-Arrive a half an hour early to work everyday. You'll be getting
    moved around from station to station, and this takes more time. The
    person you're relieving can't go home until you are in service.

    15)-Ask your officer's permission before washing your car or doing
    personal projects at work. Using stand-by time for personal projects is
    a privilege, not a given.

    16)-Never stop learning. Each night, the T.V. lounge will tempt you.
    You always have the choice to veg out or develop your skills as a
    firefighter: read, tie knots, practice skills, go over equipment. It is
    a choice. Although a majority of citizens respect the profession, there
    are those that see firefighters as overfed slugs that watch TV and sleep
    on the taxpayers tab. Prove them wrong.

    17)-Some of you may be coming to the job with previous fire service
    experience. Some volunteer, some paid-on-call, and some may have been
    on other union/professional departments. On these departments, you may
    have years of experience, and even been ranking officers or drivers.
    Well, I've got bad news for you, and this is just the way the fire
    service is: even your experience as a Battalion Chief means very little
    with the members of your new department. As Captain Bob says, "You must
    leave your rank and experience hanging in the locker of your old
    department." (www.eatstress.com) Don't let this confuse or anger
    you-your officer would much rather have a probie who has proven
    herself/himself on the fireground, rather than worry if you are going to
    soil yourself the first time he drags you into a working fire. But be
    warned-resist the temptation to talk about your experiences while on
    probation. You will appear to be tooting your own horn, sounding cocky
    and over confident, and you will, with lightning speed, develop a
    reputation all over the department as a big mouthed know-it-all.
    Remember that actions speak louder than words.

    -(Footnote to the above: Here's a challenge for you, and it's hard to
    practice: If your officer is teaching a new skill, or a senior
    firefighter wants to show you something, and you already know everything
    about it, don't say anything. If you keep quiet, you may learn a new
    way to do something, or see a point of view you never considered. Even
    if you know more about the subject than anyone in the room, keep your
    lip zipped and it will be a good review for you. Obviously, if you know
    some fancy-pants rescue knot in an emergency and your officer is looking
    for ideas, now would be an appropriate time to speak up.

    16)-This next point has been given to me by several Appleton officers
    and senior firefighters. Your probation-all 18 months of it-is a golden
    opportunity to make an impression on your coworkers. Because this
    opportunity lasts over a period of months, its effects will last for the
    duration of your career. If you work your butt off, are respectful, and
    listen more than you speak, you will develop an image as a darn good
    firefighter. On the contrary, for the rest of your career, your will
    never work hard enough to shake a reputation as a slacker or bigmouth.

    17)-Find one aspect of the job that is particularly interesting to you,
    and research the hell out of it. If you like it and you become
    knowledgeable, you become an asset to your crew in that area. Some guys
    love extrication, and have become informal experts because of their
    interest. Rope rescue, haz-mat, EMS, anything. No sympathy is available
    for bored probies.

    18)-In the beginning of your probation, your crew takes you on and
    knows nothing about you. You will make mistakes, believe me. All of
    this advice is not intended to make you terrified of screwing up. But
    it is my opinion that I (as a rookie) am a liability to my crew. Sure,
    it is their responsibility to look out for you-but you have the
    opportunity to return the favor by thinking of ways to make your
    presence a blessing not a burden. Any lughead can bring in ice cream,
    but how about the previous point-- How can I be an asset to my crew?
    Know your equipment, know the way your officer likes to operate. All
    this takes time, by the way.

    19)-Firefighters can be a gossipy bunch. You will inevitably be told
    things about the business of others, but just remember that the business
    of others is none of your business. Resist judging people you may or may
    not know based on this sort of low-quality information. This is a hard
    one for a new guy because joining in on talking smack seems like a
    shortcut to being buddy-buddy with your crew, but it will lead to bad
    things. Remember, "Speak only well of others and you need never
    whisper."

    20)-The same goes for racist and sexist comments & jokes-just because
    it happens, doesn't make it acceptable. There's no need for you to
    express disapproval, but don't join in. It's the 21st century, and
    there's no place for that anymore. As public service pros, we can set a
    positive example even in the firehouse, out of earshot of the public.
    Chief Alan Brunacini says "What we practice on the inside, we deliver on
    the outside." Choose to practice respect.

    21)-Get to know your driver and what makes him/her happy. If the
    driver isn't happy ain't nobody happy. Offer to help them if there's
    nothing else to do-the driver is responsible for the rig AND every last
    piece of equipment on it. If you're back from a call and the officer is
    back in bed, but your driver is getting your rig back in service, help
    out.

    22)-Don't swear or talk smack in front of a Battalion Chief. If I need
    to explain this, you're in the wrong profession.

    23)-Don't complain. Give me a break-you are getting paid over sixteen
    dollars an hour to do a job you already love-you should be smiling all
    the time. If your officer assigns you to pick up dog poop, clean the
    underside of the rig, or you go a few shifts without calls, suck it up.
    You can take it-you're a tough firefighter, remember?

    24)-Let me re-iterate the last point: DON'T COMPLAIN ABOUT CHORES for
    crying out loud!
    I'm shocked by this when I hear this coming from the mouth of a new
    firefighter. I actually heard a 4 month firefighter complaining that he
    had to clean the dish of a 15 year fire veteran. Cry me a river,
    smartypants. This is part of a probie's job.

    25)-If you're ever unsure of what to do or how something goes, don't
    ever fake it. Your crew is depending on you with their lives, so when
    in doubt, ask first. Given the choice between bugging your officer with
    a question, or having you make a mistake, your officer would gladly
    answer your question.

    26)-Your driver owns the rig you are assigned to. If you mess with,
    alter, adjust, or break anything on it without telling your driver,
    prepare to deal with his/her wrath. Imagine going out to your car in
    the morning and finding it wrecked or otherwise out of commission.
    Well, this is worse. Your driver is staking his/her reputation and your
    safety on the knowledge that the rig is as exactly as he/she left it.

    27)-Even if your crew seems to be really tight, and everyone acts
    buddy-buddy and jokes around with each other-don't get too casual with
    your crew; and don't argue, talk back to, or question your officer.
    This may seem obvious to you-but I've seen it happen. All of these
    tips are based on real experiences or observations.

    28)-In my life, when things get challenging at work, my motto is, "look
    on the bright side, you could be in Navy Seal training." The point
    being, be thankful of your position at all times. Probationary
    firefighters have it relatively easy in Appleton. Some larger
    departments run recruit schools just like Army boot camps. Madison
    doesn't allow probies in the TV lounge for 18 months. Milwaukee starts
    chopping at first light, every morning for the duration of recruit
    school. West Allis firefighters refuse to even speak to probies at all
    for 18 months. So smile.

    29)- Avoid having a chip on your shoulder, or something to prove.

    30)-Some firefighters are funny about accepting help. If someone cooks
    dinner for the crew and there is a sink full of dishes, there's no need
    to ask whether there's anything you can help with. Jump in! Want to try
    a fun experiment? Try sitting in the TV lounge while a senior
    firefighter cleans the pots and pans from the meal he just cooked for
    the crew and you.

    31)-About sarcasm and jokes and pranks around the firehouse-you can
    tough it out. It is kind of an unspoken method the see how you deal
    with stress. You think this is bad, try the stress of a fireground at
    three in the morning.

    32)-About pranks and practical jokes-use your best judgement about the
    necessity and severity of your prank, stick to your own recruit
    classmates for the majority of your probation, and never, ever mess with
    someone's emergency equipment.

    33)-Remember, after hearing all of this, as well as advice from other
    firefighters, remember one thing-everyone on the whole department is
    senior to you right now, and they've got a lot of things to say about
    what you are doing, but they want you to succeed. They want your
    probation to go smoothly. So don't get overwhelmed by criticism or
    other feedback.

    34)-Remember to turn your handheld radio down or off before your
    officer transmits to avoid Jimi
    Hendrix-like feedback. Its an easy way to bug your officer. You will
    forget this one, trust me.

    35)-Even though you are the lowly firefighter, don't get lulled into
    the sense that you should do nothing but run to the rig when the alarm
    comes in. Though you may not be a driver for some time, pay attention
    to and remember the address when the dispatch comes in-for that one time
    when the driver says "What was that?"-it'll be worth it.

    36)-When the day finally arrives that you've been waiting for-finishing
    probation-you will be tempted to suddenly act like a veteran towards
    more new hires and other firefighters. This spells trouble-hopefully
    you have formed good habits during probation, don't let go of a good
    thing now.

    )-Be prepared for a senior firefighter to get a hold of this and say,
    "You're taking advice from Austin Treehugger Powers?? That guy is a few
    sandwiches short of a picnic!" These are just some of the lessons we've
    all learned our first year. You may choose to ignore all of this and
    learn from your own experience. Just know that I do not aim to preach,
    but simply to share knowledge that may make your probation easier, and
    in turn, will set the scene for a good career.

    -And finally, be thankful and proud. You've got the best job in the
    whole darn world. Hold onto that thought alone and you'll succeed.

  3. #3
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CALFFBOU
    Congratulations and welcome to the American Fire Service!



    1)-Don't wait to be told to get things done around the station. If your
    day slows down and your officer is preoccupied, there's a long list of
    station maintenance always available to you. Wash blue rags, change roll
    towels, organize what's disorganized, clean what's dirty.

    2)-Along the same lines, if you see something in the station that is
    obviously wrong, fix it. Something that needs to be put away, or picked
    up, or repaired. Don't wait for someone else to do it, or wait for an
    officer to tell you to do it. Take pride in making the buck stop with
    you.

    I have definatly found these to be good things to always remember when at the station even though I am just an explorer. I have no problem with doing anything while I am at the station, washing masks, helping with the compressor, drying hose, re-packing hose, washing hose, mopping the floor, washing trucks, carrying tables or chairs, I love everything about being at the firehouse, I just love to be there.
    ------------------------------------
    These opinions are mine and do not reflect the opinions of any organizations I am affiliated with.
    ------------------------------------

  4. #4
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    Thumbs up Not just for rookies!

    there is some good advice in this thread for everybody! Thanks for posting it!
    Mark Zanghetti
    FF-EMT
    Goshen Fire Dept.
    Waterford, CT

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    Really, Really good information. Thank you for taking the time to put all of this into writing. IT is now a page in my recruit manual. Thanks.

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    Default

    i'm no where near going to the academy or being hired, but i'm printing that information out for when the time comes. thanks for being so helpful =]
    stay safe

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    Default

    Step up
    Listen up
    Shut up

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    Smile Recruit Training Website

    If anyone is interested in finding out what the training is like for a firefighter I have made a website of my training in the NSWFB (Australia).
    Have a look at http://www.pva68.com/NSW%20Fire%20Brigade/ and let me know what you think.

    Cheers All.

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    Default This Will Help me

    This was great...I am going to value from this information greatly...

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    Default Thanks For the Info!

    Just wanted to say thank you for the probie info. I just finished my BI for LAFD and I'm sure everything went well. I liked the remark on 28....."Things could be worse, you could be in SEAL Training." I know exactly what you mean I was in SEAL training for 6 months! Im very optomistic about doing well in the academy. I had many questions about probation, your guidelines will help.

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    Awesome! Thanks

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    Default Thanks for the time

    Thanks for the time and effort you obviously put into typing it onto this site.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by VinnieB
    Step up
    Listen up
    Shut up
    you forgot clean up

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    From another site....Obviously not all are going to fit for every firehouse or dept, but there is still some good stuff....

    1)I'm going in this F****** Door, and I'm going out this Mother F****** Door.
    2) When you get off the rig, ask yourself, "What Do I See?"
    3)When you're in a Building, ask yourself "Where am I?"
    4)SLOW THE F*** DOWN
    5)Know Your rig. You MUST know where everything is on your rig.
    6)When checking the masks, DO IT RIGHT!
    7)After a job, YOU hop up in the hose bed. NEVER let anyone else re-pack your hosebed.
    8)If Someone asks you for your tool, say "What do you need?" NEVER GIVE UP YOUR TOOL.
    9)NEVER GIVE UP THE NOZZLE
    10)THE ROOF: Check the Stability of the roof, AND a SECONDARY means of egress.
    11)THE ROOF: Open the Bulkhead, AND Probe the landing for victimes.
    12)THE ROOF: Vent The Skylight, AND check for a draft stop
    13)THE ROOF: After you cut the roof, push down the ceiling
    14)When doing the Quick release procedure, NEVER let go with your LEFT hand.
    15)OVM, Remember, the firt thing you do when you get off the rig, is check with the chauffer to position the apparatus. TOP FLOOR JOB, 1st due saw to the roof.
    16)Before you leave the job, make sure you have all your tools. CHECK YOUR RIG!
    17) THE DOOR: a)Check the doorKnob
    b)Control the door
    c)Check Behind the Door
    d)Chock the door
    18)If something is being done in the firehouse, YOU are doing it, or helping someone do it.
    19)Control Position, ALWAYS check the hydrant!
    20)Don't be the last one on the rig, TURN OUT!
    21)This Job is about being ready, ALWAYS BE READY!
    22)____________
    23)What Happens in the firehouse, STAYS in the firehouse
    24)When you make a mistake, (and you will) ADMIT IT! And LEARN BY IT!
    25)If you use the can at a job, put it between your legs when you're riding back to Quarters. As soon as you get back, refill the can.
    26)READ SOMETHING EVERY TOUR, KNOW YOUR JOB!
    27)After roll call, look at the riding lists, KNOW WHO YOU'RE WORKING WITH!
    28)Can Man/Irons Man, Nozzle man/Backup Man, NEVER let anyone between you!
    29)SHUT THE F*** UP, AND DO WHAT YOUR TOLD!
    30)When changing cylinders after a job, DO NOT put your gear on the outside of the rig. Put your gead on the INSIDE of the rig. Tower ladders and Aerials, do not lean your tools on the side of the rig.
    31)NO CELL PHONES on the apparatus floor. No cell phones on the rig.
    32)Do not give out members telephone numbers from the firehouse.
    33)DO NOT F*** with firefighters gear.
    34)Make sure at the end of the tour, you REMOVE "YOUR" GEAR from the rig.
    35)SOUNDS:a)WATER,Someone's in the sink, that's your job. Get in the sink!
    b)APPARATUS DOOR, go check it out, know what's going on in your firehouse.
    c)POWER TOOLS, someone's checking the tools, that's your job, know your tools!
    d)THE PHONE, answer the telephone in the firehouse.
    e)AIRHORN, pay Attention!
    f)OFFICERS DOOR, If the Boss Gets off the rig, YOU get off the rig!
    g)Motorcycles and Helicopters, Up to You to figure out!
    36)When you're a Guide-man, you're a guide-man. PAY ATTENTION!
    37)When backing out of a block, never walk directly behind the rig, stay in sight of the mirrors so the Chauffer can see you. At night carry a Flashlight.
    38)There is no such thing as a wooden fence, BLAST right through it.
    39)When working, do not hang your turnout coat and radio on the rig.
    40)You Should be at work AT LEAST ONE HOUR BEFORE the tour starts.
    41)If you're going to be late, call the firehouse.
    42)When working the night tour, make sure you're on the apparatus floor in the morning between 7:30am-8am
    43)NOZZLEMAN, BLEED the F****** line, and SWEEP the F****** floor!
    44)If there is a detail out of your house, offer to take it for the senior man.
    45)When detailed, check with the Officer on duty when you get there.
    46)Be the last one to sit down for chow.
    47)If you're assigned to a truck, have a truckie light!
    48)I know this is on the first page, SHUT THE F*** UP AND DO WHAT YOU'RE TOLD!
    49)Carry a knife, have it accessible, not in your pocket
    50)Stay in shape for this job!
    51)Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate!!!
    52)"Life Insurance", and a "will", keep it up to date.
    53)Radio in Hand. When you ride for someone, Physically get their radio. When you are being relieved by someone else, give them your radio.
    54)Take a mark for every injury, When filling out the CD-72, always check with a senior man.
    55)SLOW THE F*** DOWN!
    56)This will always be your first job! DO NOT let your side job effect our job!
    57)STEP UP! Mutuals, Holidays, Company parties etc.
    58)DO NOT take overtime if a brother has a mutual on the board, work the mutual!
    59)Read the Blackboard and bulletin board in the kitchen; there is important information there.
    60)Pay your house tax.
    61)When your get your assignments from Proby School, make sure you know when to report to work.
    62)Before you slide the pole, take a quick look down.
    63)Before roll call, go up to the office and get the names of the incoming members for the housewatch.
    64)Mark all your gear
    65)When draining the hoseline, drain it AWAY fromt he rig.
    66)When you go to the "ROCK", be clean shaven, wear the proper uniform.
    67)WEAR YOUR HOOD!
    68)When on Building Inspection, carry a tool and a flashlight.
    69)When coming back from a late run, check with the officer before punching the unit back in service.
    71)DRILL, DRILL, DRILL!!!!
    72)Do not keep your finger on the down button when closing the apparatus door. Make sure the rig is out of Quarters before closing the door.
    73)There's no time like the present. If something needs to be done, just do it!
    74)Never Panic! If the sh*t hits the fan, kiss the floor, stay low, NEVER rip off your facepiece.
    75)COMMERCIAL BUILDING=SEARCH ROPE!
    76)LINE OF DUTY DEATHS: You are at 2 PLACES.
    AT THE FUNERAL or WORKING, ABSOLUTLEY NO EXCEPTIONS!
    77)Memorial Day, Medal Day, BE THERE!
    78) DO THE RIGHT THING ON THIS JOB!
    79)STEP UP! STEP UP! STEP UP!
    80)STAY FOCUSED!
    81)NEVER GIVE UP!
    82)GIVE YOUR HEART TO THIS JOB!
    83)MAKE A DIFFERENCE! Every Tour...
    84)STAY SAFE
    Proud East Coast Traditionalist.

  15. #15
    This space for rent
    NYSmokey's Avatar
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    May 2001
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    Recently relocated to Baltimore County, MD
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    A lot of wisdom in those words
    Tom

    Never Forget 9-11-2001

    Stay safe out there!

    IACOJ Member

  16. #16
    DVFD
    kldugas412's Avatar
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    Mar 2006
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    Duson,La
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    I wish I had all of these words of wisdom when I broke out.

    I think a few of us old timers forgot some of these great words

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