1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    2

    Question Intake relief Valve

    Can any tell me if its against NFPA to have the Piston Intake Relief Valve for LDH on the pump operators side of the Pump. If it is do you know the number.

  2. #2
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Las Vegas,Nevada
    Posts
    1,012

    Smile intake

    Try looking at NFPA 1901 on page 1901-44 for Pump Intake Conections. We have the intkaes on both sides but the connection is usually made on the Captains side. Hope this helps.

  3. #3
    Forum Member
    Res343cue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Your 1st due.
    Posts
    1,651

    Default

    We've got the Jaffrey Valve on the officers side, and a buttefly on the engineers side. Both are 6" threaded connections and are able to be adapted to 4", 5", or dual 2.5"/3" lines in the even we are using smaller hoses.

    If we need 2 4" lines, we'll be using the big intakes, and one of them will have to be by the engineer.
    Quote Originally Posted by ThNozzleMan
    Why? Because we are firemen. We are decent human beings. We would be compelled by the overwhelming impulse to save an innocent child from a tragic, painful death because in the end, we are MEN.

    I A C O J
    FTM-PTB


    Honorary Disclaimer: While I am a manufacturer representative, I am not here to sell my product. Any advice or knowledge shared is for informational purposes only. I do not use Firehouse.Com for promotional purposes.

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    So of Can. / N. of Mexico
    Posts
    869

    Default intake relief valve

    NFPA 2003 says on page 45 that if a valved appliance is attached to the intake it has to be equipped with a 3/4" bleeder and a automatic pressure relief device.

    IE. a piston intake relief valve.

  5. #5
    Forum Member
    Weruj1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    NW Ohio
    Posts
    7,857

    Default

    it doesnt mater what side of the truck it is placed on .........
    IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
    Pardon me sir.. .....but I believe we are all over here !
    ATTENTION ALL SHOPPERS: Will the dead horse please report to the forums.(thanks Motown)
    RAY WAS HERE 08/28/05
    LETHA' FOREVA' ! 010607
    I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
    "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

  6. #6
    Forum Member
    Jonnee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,256

    Exclamation

    It doesn't matter which side of the pumper the valve it on, Front, Rear, Left Side or Right Side.

    For a safety standpoint, I would not like it on the operatorís side, normally the left side of the pumper. I have seen LDH come uncoupled and sometimes a larger than a pin hole develops in the hose jacket. You can and will get very wet of this happen.

    I for one, do not like anything, when I was a pump operator, coming off the side that I had to work on. I would prefer that all intake lines and discharge lines, come off the opposite side or rear of the apparatus. This also goes for cross lays. Nothing is worst than having these hoseís hanging over your head and getting caught up in them.

    I stress to my members of the company that they pull lines and connect lines opposite of the operator.

  7. #7
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    124

    Default

    We have a piston intake on the side away from the pump operator. When connecting to a hydrant we lay a 5" line to that side to get if away from the pump operator. We have a BIV valve on the pump operators side to use for drafting, so that he can open and close the suction line as needed while running the pump. Both sides can be adapted to allow for either type connection. This set up has worked very well for us because we have both areas with and without hydrants. Where we don't have hydrants we normally use drop tanks and set up a draft.

  8. #8
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Greensboro, NC USA
    Posts
    1,318

    Default PIV side choices

    Nothing in NFPA 1901 to prohibit it. But there are specific prohibitions from having a discharge at the operator's panel larger than 2.5".

    If it's unwise to have a large diameter discharge near the operator, why would anyone want a large diameter intake near one?

    I've seen some stout hydrants in my day, and all it takes is one moment for a 5" to break an ankle.

    1. Put the PIV on the Captain's side.
    2. Teach drivers to preset the Discharge Relief Valve to protect the preconnects when he opens it and can't throttle down when making the changeover.
    Last edited by txgp17; 09-19-2009 at 01:33 AM.

  9. #9
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    7

    Thumbs up

    For a safety standpoint, I would not like it on the operatorís side, normally the left side of the pumper. I have seen LDH come uncoupled and sometimes a larger than a pin hole develops in the hose jacket. You can and will get very wet of this happen.

    I for one, do not like anything, when I was a pump operator, coming off the side that I had to work on. I would prefer that all intake lines and discharge lines, come off the opposite side or rear of the apparatus. This also goes for cross lays. Nothing is worst than having these hoseís hanging over your head and getting caught up in them.

    Jonnee, I have to agree with you on this one. I would like to add that if you order a new unit with behind the panel butterflys, they will come with behind the panel intake relief valves. That means you can get by with only the adapters you need to make the hose connections.

    I do like the idea of not having intakes and discharges running by the MPO.
    One exception to that is having hard suction on the panel side, little easier to watch the drop tanks.

  10. #10
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northeast Coast
    Posts
    3,908

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by txgp17 View Post
    Nothing in NFPA 1901 to prohibit it. But there are specific prohibitions from having a discharge at the operator's panel larger than 2.5".

    If it's unwise to have a large diameter discharge near the operator, why would anyone want a large diameter intake near one?

    I've seen some stout hydrants in my day, and all it takes is one moment for a 5" to break an ankle.

    1. Put the PIV on the Captain's side.
    2. Teach drivers to preset the Discharge Relief Valve to protect the preconnects when he opens it and can't throttle down when making the changeover.
    Interesting! How about a 2.5" or 1.75" at 3 times the pressure of the LDH and way less weight? I'd say you have a better chance of getting hit hard in the squash by a smaller diameter than LDH, but I'm sure NFPA knows a lot more than I do.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Intake pressure for relief valves & governors
    By kneedferspeed1 in forum The Engineer
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-23-2004, 12:31 AM
  2. suction intake relief valves?
    By ilfireinstructr in forum The Engineer
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-07-2004, 12:08 AM
  3. Pumper Intake Valve
    By bellmont25 in forum The Engineer
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-16-2003, 11:49 PM
  4. RFP's
    By D Littrell in forum Apparatus Innovation
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-08-2000, 07:36 PM
  5. Relief Valve question
    By Ward Watson in forum The Engineer
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-26-2000, 10:52 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register