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  1. #1
    Forum Member Co11FireGal's Avatar
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    Default Trial of Saddam Hussein

    Don't know how many of you have been following the trial of Saddam Hussein but, for those of you who have, I am curious as to your thoughts on the whole thing...the topic probably seems like complete stream of consciousness, but just something I was thinking about earlier...

    Do you think that the Iraqi Special Tribunal is sufficient for the crimes they will be/are trying?

    How about Hussein's continuance of trial?
    IACOJ

    "And let us not grow weary while doing good, for in due season we shall reap it if we do not lose heart."


  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber RoughRider's Avatar
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    I just read a report that Saddam's Lawyer was kidnapped. Should see the beheading footage on Al~Jazeera in due time.
    Fortune does not change men; it unmasks them.

    The grass ain't greener, the wine ain't sweeter!! Either side of the hill.


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  3. #3
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    ^ I think it's kind of funny that no one wants him to have a defense lawyer. Think how hard it will be for a new defense lawyer to take him as a client now..
    An education is only wasted when the taught individual chooses not to recognize the value of the lesson.

  4. #4
    Forum Member RspctFrmCalgary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoughRider
    I just read a report that Saddam's Lawyer was kidnapped. Should see the beheading footage on Al~Jazeera in due time.
    He was found shot dead.
    September 11th - Never Forget

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  5. #5
    Forum Member RspctFrmCalgary's Avatar
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    Hussein co-defendant's lawyer killed
    Attorney was abducted from his office

    Friday, October 21, 2005; Posted: 2:05 p.m. EDT (18:05 GMT)


    BAGHDAD, Iraq (CNN) -- The attorney for one of former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein's co-defendants was found shot in the head hours after he was abducted by gunmen, police said Friday.

    Sadoon Janabi was working in his office in Baghdad when five gunmen stormed in and abducted him, according to police.

    Officers said his body was found between 10 p.m. and 11 p.m. Thursday near Firdous Mosque in the Banook neighborhood of northern Baghdad, but it was not officially identified until Friday morning. (Watch lawyer in Saddam trial found dead -- 1:52)

    He was shot once, police said.

    Janabi had been representing Awad Hamad Bandar, the former chief judge of Hussein's Revolutionary Court. (Full story)

    Bandar is accused of having sentenced to death more than 140 residents of Dujail following a failed assassination attempt on Hussein in 1982.

    He was seated next to the ousted Iraqi leader on Wednesday during the first day of the trial.

    Bandar and Hussein are among eight former regime members being tried on charges related to the Dujail killings.

    Kamal Allaw, head of the Iraqi Lawyers Union, said authorities must protect all lawyers, but said "there is no security provided to the lawyers involved in Saddam's trial nor to any of the union's members."

    "We are sorry to hear the tragic news of abducting then killing (of) our colleague Sadoon Janabi. His mission was simply defending his client (in) the court of law."

    Allaw said that "as lawyers, our message is all about law and justice."

    Badee' Arrif, an attorney representing former Deputy Prime Minister Tariq Aziz and two other defendants in another case before the Iraqi Special Tribunal, said the kidnapping would not deter him.

    "I will continue to defend my clients to the end, no matter what," he told CNN.

    However, the killing of the lawyer could delay the trial of Hussein and his seven co-defendants even further, CNN's Aneesh Raman reported on Friday.

    The trial of Hussein, Bandar and the six other co-defendants has been adjourned until November 28. (Full story)

    The case is the first against Hussein, who is expected to be charged with crimes against humanity and genocide for acts committed during his almost three-decade rule over Iraq.

    Janabi was one of the few lawyers to address the court at Wednesday's hearing. He said the defense had had insufficient time to study the evidence and accused the U.S.-backed Baghdad government of driving the process, Reuters reported.

    Votes counted
    Iraqi authorities have counted the ballots from last weekend's constitutional referendum and plan to announce the results on Sunday or Monday, according to an election official.

    Safwat Rashid Sidai, a member of the Independent Electoral Commission of Iraq, said the results would be released once election workers wrap up verification procedures in the polling.

    Two teams of officials and international experts were double-checking the ballot boxes in six of the country's 18 provinces that had unusually lopsided results.

    One team examined ballot boxes in Irbil, Babil and Basra and found no irregularities.

    Another team has been sent to locales in the provinces of Tameem, Nineveh and Diyala in the north. The commission said no problems have been found in Baghdad.

    Other developments

    Four U.S. troops -- three Marines and a soldier -- were killed in combat in Anbar province, the military announced on Friday. The Marines were killed by a roadside bomb in Nasser Wa Salaam and the soldier died from wounds suffered in Hit. The deaths bring the number of U.S. troops killed in the war to 1,989.


    Arab League Secretary General Amre Moussa is in Baghdad to meet with government officials. He arrived on Thursday for a three-day visit, according to Iraq's Foreign Ministry.


    A correspondent for London's Guardian newspaper was freed Thursday, one day after he was kidnapped in Iraq, according to officials from the British Foreign Office in Iraq. Rory Carroll, 33, spoke to his family, and told them he is safe and well, the officials said.


    A mortar round landed inside an elementary school Thursday morning in the Mansur district of Baghdad, killing a student and two adults. The attack wounded five other students.

    CNN's Mohammed Tawfeeq and Enes Dulami contributed to this report.
    September 11th - Never Forget

    I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

    Sheri
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  6. #6
    Forum Member firehick's Avatar
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    Thumbs down

    In my personal oponion, Saddam should not have a defense attorney. He shouldn't even be up against a government tribunial. He was the supreme commander of Iraq's military forces and paraded around constantly in military uniform. We need to go back to WWII and put him on a military tribunal and he can defend himslef like every other scuz ball in the world has. Personally I have a few ideas of how to deal with him myself, but that another post another time.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by firehick
    In my personal oponion, Saddam should not have a defense attorney. He shouldn't even be up against a government tribunial. He was the supreme commander of Iraq's military forces and paraded around constantly in military uniform. We need to go back to WWII and put him on a military tribunal and he can defend himslef like every other scuz ball in the world has. Personally I have a few ideas of how to deal with him myself, but that another post another time.
    The crimes that he committed, particularly the ones he is on trial for now, occurred in Iraq against Iraqis. The trial should take place in Iraq, in the Iraqi justice system by Iraqi citizens. That is what we are trying to do, turn Iraq into a country that is independent and able to take care of itself.

    As far as a defense attorney, why not? If the court rules in Iraq permit a defense attorney, then he would be entitled to it.

    Too many people judge foreign justice systems by the standards and practices we have here in the US. That is comparing apples to oranges.

  8. #8
    Forum Member Co11FireGal's Avatar
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    Default Iraq Asks Return of Some Officers of Hussein Army

    November 3, 2005, from NY Times Online
    Iraq Asks Return of Some Officers of Hussein Army
    By EDWARD WONG

    BAGHDAD, Iraq, Nov. 2 - The Iraqi government called Wednesday for the return of junior officers from the disbanded army of Saddam Hussein, openly reversing an American directive issued in 2003.

    The move is aimed at draining the insurgency of recruits and bolstering the Iraqi security forces, Iraqi officials said.

    The Defense Ministry, with the support of the American military, has quietly recruited a few thousand former officers over the last 18 months. But this is the first time it has offered an open invitation to broad classes of former officers to rejoin the armed forces.

    The move could represent a political overture by the Shiite-led government to disaffected Sunni Arabs, possibly to drum up support before the December legislative elections.

    With the announcement on Wednesday, any former officers up to the rank of major are eligible for reinstatement by applying in November at recruitment centers in six cities across Iraq.

    The move by the Defense Ministry represents the most public departure yet from an American policy instituted by L. Paul Bremer III, the former head of the American occupation, of cleansing the Iraqi government and security forces of former members of Mr. Hussein's Baath Party and disbanding the Iraqi Army.

    Many American commanders and military analysts have said the dissolution of the 400,000-member Iraqi Army in May 2003 drove many thousands of Sunni Arab soldiers and officers into the insurgency while depriving the country of a force that could help restore order. American and Iraqi officials now say a core part of the Sunni-led insurgency is made up of former members of Mr. Hussein's military.

    Iraqi officials said any recruits signing up in November would go through a rigorous screening process intended to weed out possible insurgents.

    Both the Americans and the Iraqis have been retreating in stages from Mr. Bremer's original "de-Baathification" order since early 2004. But American and Iraqi officials said Wednesday's announcement was significant for several reasons.

    It not only explicitly extends an invitation to thousands more officers, but in symbolic terms, it also represents an official recognition of a practice under way for some time.

    Some senior American military officials said Wednesday that the announcement seemed aimed at Sunni Arab officers, relatively few of whom have rejoined the military. They added that the Iraqi Army was desperately short of midlevel officers.

    In Washington, a State Department official said that in negotiations on the constitution earlier this year, overseen by the United States ambassador, Zalmay Khalilzad, the Shiite majority agreed to lift some restrictions on Baath Party participation in the government.

    "It was loosened a bit, but it was not a dramatic loosening that might have led more Sunnis to support the constitution in the referendum," said the official, who requested anonymity so he would not be seen as interfering in Iraqi affairs.

    A spokesman for the Defense Ministry, Saleh Sarhan, said in an interview that Iraq needed the expertise of the former officers. The new army is trying to rebuild armor and artillery units and wants the return of tank drivers, mechanics and others, he added.

    "We're trying to carry out big operations against the terrorists, such as sealing the borders of Iraq," Mr. Sarhan said.

    In recent months, many American officers have acknowledged that it will be years before the Iraqi Army is capable of fighting the insurgency on its own. Gen. George W. Casey Jr., the top American commander in Iraq, told the Senate Armed Services Committee in September that only one Iraqi battalion was then able to operate without the aid of the American-led forces.

    The Iraqi government's announcement came during a surge of violence at the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. Officials said at least 30 Iraqis died in attacks across the country on Wednesday, the deadliest taking place in the town of Musayyib, where a suicide bomber in a minivan packed with explosives killed at least 19 people and wounded 61 others near a Shiite mosque.

    The American military announced the deaths of six troops, two from a Marine helicopter crash in western Iraq that may have resulted from insurgent fire.

    The helicopter, an AH-1W "Super Cobra," went down at about 8:15 a.m. near the insurgent stronghold of Ramadi, the capital of rebellious Anbar Province, the Marines said in a statement. Col. Dave Lapan, a Marine spokesman, said the cause of the crash remained unclear.

    But there were strong indications that the helicopter had been brought down by insurgents. At 2 p.m., a Marine Corps F-18D fighter jet dropped two 500-pound bombs on "a reported insurgent command center" just 500 yards from the helicopter crash site, said Capt. Jeffrey S. Pool, another Marine spokesman. He added that there was no immediate report on the number of casualties from the air strike.

    Anbar lies at the heart of the Sunni Arab insurgency, and several American helicopters have been shot down over its harsh desert terrain. Two of the other American deaths announced Wednesday, those of a marine and a sailor, occurred Tuesday in Ramadi, when insurgents attacked an American vehicle with a roadside bomb, the military said.

    A soldier was killed south of Baghdad Tuesday in a roadside bomb explosion, and another died Wednesday of wounds sustained in an attack near Balad the previous day.

    The car bombing in Musayyib, south of Baghdad, took place at around 5 p.m. outside a restaurant and just hundreds of feet from a Shiite mosque that was attacked by a suicide bomber in July. The explosion occurred as Iraqis were going home to celebrate the start of Id al-Fitr, the three-day celebration that marks the end of Ramadan.

    In Baghdad, American military and Iraqi police officials reported two roadside bomb explosions that killed five civilians each. One took place in the south of the city, the other in the east. In the evening, two insurgents were killed in the explosion of a car bomb they were building in a house in western Baghdad, an Interior Ministry official said.

    Political jockeying accelerated ahead of the Dec. 15 elections for a full-term National Assembly. Ahmad Chalabi, the former exile and onetime Pentagon favorite, kicked off his campaign by holding a news conference with fellow candidates from his slate.

    Mr. Chalabi is the most prominent politician to break away from the religious Shiite parties that ran together as a coalition in last January's elections. He seems to be making a bid for a major position in the new government. He also appears to be repairing ties with the Bush administration, which accused him in the spring of 2004 of leaking American code-breaking secrets to the Iranians. His spokesman, Haider Mousawi, said Wednesday that Mr. Chalabi planned to meet in Washington on Nov. 9 with Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and on Nov. 15 with Treasury Secretary John Snow.

    In its Wednesday announcement, the Defense Ministry laid out a schedule for the recruitment of former officers. From Nov. 6 to 10, officers who held the rank of major can walk into designated recruitment centers and go through an interview and medical checkup. Those with ranks of captain, first lieutenant and lieutenant will then go in successive waves, until Dec. 1.

    "The government made this announcement to put the right people back in the right jobs," Maj. Manaf Abdul-Hussein, formerly of the Iraqi Air Force, said in a telephone interview. "We've worked in the military for a long time, and we're specialists in the field."

    The major said he knew of many colleagues clamoring for their jobs back because of the high unemployment rate.

    Another former air force officer, Maj. Maithem al-Qaraghuli, said he had been pleasantly surprised by the ministry's announcement.

    "I heard about the call today, and I'm thinking seriously of responding to it, because the pension I'm getting right now is not enough," he said. "It's just $80 a month. If you're supporting a family, that's just not enough."

    The disbanding of the Iraqi Army and the purging of former senior Baath Party members from government, both announced in May 2003 by Mr. Bremer, have been widely criticized as two of the worst policy blunders of the American occupation. Some Shiite leaders, especially Mr. Chalabi, strongly supported the moves and continue to advocate such purges.

    But Iraqi and American officials began in 2004 to roll back the changes. Mr. Bremer himself announced in April 2004 that the American administration wanted to encourage the return of teachers, engineers and others who had joined the Baath Party simply for professional advancement.

    Well before the Wednesday announcement, the Defense Ministry had been recruiting former officers to work in commando units and other forces. There have been examples, though, of insurgents infiltrating the new Iraqi units.

    Reporting for this article was contributed by Dexter Filkins, Qais Mizher and Ali Adeeb in Baghdad, and Eric Schmitt and Steven R. Weisman in Washington.
    IACOJ

    "And let us not grow weary while doing good, for in due season we shall reap it if we do not lose heart."

  9. #9
    Forum Member RspctFrmCalgary's Avatar
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    Lawyer in Saddam trial shot dead
    Last Updated Tue, 08 Nov 2005 10:53:38 EST
    CBC News
    Gunmen shot and killed a lawyer for one of Saddam Hussein's co-defendants on Tuesday, the second defence lawyer in the trial killed in less than a month.


    INDEPTH: The Special Tribunal


    The car carrying Adel al-Zubeidi crashed in Baghdad's Adil neighborhood, Tuesday, Nov. 8. (AP Photo/Asaad Muhsin)
    Adel al-Zubeidi was killed by shooters in a speeding car in the Adil neighborhood of Baghdad. He had been representing former Iraqi vice-president Taha Yassin Ramadan, one of Saddam's seven co-defendants in the high-profile crimes against humanity trial.

    The trial has been adjourned until late November.


    FROM OCT. 21, 2005: Lawyer in Saddam trial found dead

    Another defence lawyer, Thamir al-Khuzaie, was injured in the attack.

    Saddam's lawyer, Khalil al-Dulaimi, blamed "an armed group using government vehicles," alleging the Iraqi government is trying to intimidate foreign or Arab lawyers.

    In late October, Iraqi police found the body of Saadoun Sughaiyer al-Janabi, a lawyer who represented another of Saddam's co-accused.

    His body was found near a mosque in Baghdad with two gunshot wounds to the head.

    He had been representing Awad Hamed al-Bandar, one of seven Baathist party officials being tried along with Saddam for murder, torture, forced expulsion and illegal imprisonment in the 1982 massacre of Shias in the town of Dujail, north of Baghdad.

    Prosecutors and the five judges have been provided with heavy security, but the court hasn't assigned security to defence lawyers.
    September 11th - Never Forget

    I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

    Sheri
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  10. #10
    Forum Member FDNY101TRUCK's Avatar
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    Hmmm two defense attorneys dead....you think they are trying to say something? Maybe third one's a charm...
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