1. #1
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    Default Covering Jet...good or bad.

    OK Gang,
    Another often used tactic over here... taught in the early weeks of Training. the use of a 'Covering Jet'

    To explain, a Covering jet is a line that is got to work from outside a building to protect a Firefighter on a ladder carrying out a rescue.

    In almost all circumstances this is where a rescue is required and the building is still well within the envelope of an aggressive interior attack. So, in the situation below, had it not been for the woman requiring a visible rescue there is no way a line is used from the outside. It is also good practice to call up to the person trapped at the window to confirm if anyone else is inside...otherwise there is a minimal risk of pushing the fire back into them.

    I say minimal, because a textbook use of a covering jet is to cool the fire gases coming from the window to allow relief for the rescuer and victim. It is not about putting the fire in the room out. I have, in the past, been on a Covering jet and put a bit of water up onto the ceiling to cool the room a little ensuring I am not driving the fire back into the Building.

    Again this is a well used tactic in these situations and experience shows we are able to launch a simultaneous interior attack with no compromise or increase in damage.

    What are your thoughts?
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    Last edited by SteveDude; 10-27-2005 at 03:29 PM.
    Steve Dude
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    When I was in the Navy,we'd use two lines for attacking a fire with water.One was a standard nozzle for a stream on the attack and the other had a fog tip that we used to absorb the heat and protect the hoseteams.
    It worked well but I don't see it in use with my volunteer department.During training,we were shown that we do have such a device but the training officer looked at me sideways when I wanted to play with it for old times' sake.
    As you said,you need to co ordinate its use so as not to blow fire and heat back onto another team in a different part of the ship or building.At best,you'd really irk them and they'd want to know whose stupid idea it was.

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    When I was in the Navy,we'd use two lines for attacking a fire with water.One was a standard nozzle for a stream on the attack and the other had a fog tip that we used to absorb the heat and protect the hoseteams.
    We have a nozzle that shots a stream, but it also has a heat shield feature on it that allows you to have a stream on the fire at the same time, makes life soooooo much easier when you are in an open area; where you dont have to worry about steam burns so much.

    As for Steve's tactic, it sounds okay to me, as long as its not effecting any of the crews inside or other possible people trapped that the victim did not know about.
    "There are only two things that i know are infinite, the universe and human stupidity. And im not so sure about the former."

    For all the life of me, i cant see a firefighter going to hell. At least not for very long. We would end up putting out all the fires and annoying the devil too much.

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    A lot of research has went into effective water curtains, and the truth be told they well if applied in the right manner. Water curtains work better if the agent (water) is applied to the surface of the exposure not in between. Now there is some heat absorbed with a water curtain shooting water between the fire and the exposure, but its not as good.

    The picture seems to give the right idea, especially if the fire is venting from a window below the ladder, but you would have to watch out for it may create some hazards to the man/woman climbing up/down the ladder, i.e. (slippery rung surface / visual interference going up or coming down the ladder if sprayed in or around the ladder).
    Last edited by captjab; 10-29-2005 at 03:00 PM.

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    Are you telling me this isn't standard procedure I would NEVER commit firefighters to work above openings (windows) where the fire might be lurking without a covering 'jet' (stream) in place .... resources permitting.

    Steve is right .... this is a life saving tactic. I have also seen a firefighter badly burned where this hose-line was not in place. I guess, once you see it happen, you try to never let it happen again. The line is there for protection only and not firefighting. However, if the fire blew out at firefighters on a ladder I wouldn't hesitate to place that stream directly into the window if the situation called for it.

    Also - placement of ladders is important. Where possible it is sensible to site a ground ladder BETWEEN window lines. This way any firefighters on the ladder will not be sited directly over openings.

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    Standard Op? Yes it is, as a protection steam, have it in place, use it when needed, and I said be carefull when doing it, not...not to do it.
    Last edited by captjab; 10-29-2005 at 09:26 PM.

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    We dont have enough guys on the fireground to play a line under the ladder. Maybe could see the point on a hi-rise fire with multiple smoke charged floors and the need for multiple rescues from the main of which only a few would actually be directly over the fire, but other than that, never seen it done.

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    I appreciate that resources may not allow the cover line on every occasion .... but don't ever stand around if this could happen .... ANTICIPATE
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    "Ladder Slide Time"

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    Quote Originally Posted by captjab
    "Ladder Slide Time"
    Not so easy to slide when you have a victim on your back, thats the purpose of the covering jet, to protect firefighter AND victim.

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    Yes I'm very clear about the water jet, and agree . The use of a "water jet" would be second nature . The coment about the ladder slide had to do with the picture above if there wasn't a victim
    Last edited by captjab; 11-02-2005 at 05:55 PM.

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    That pic looks like me the other night. Making the roof from the porch, windows popped too early, hot hot hot ! No worse for ware, face got alittle "sunburned" but still TRUCKIN.

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    The firefighter in the cage had just delivered a team into the window to search for trapped occupants - then the window below flashed out - in his efforts to bring the now trapped team out they were all burned but survived. A well sited 'cover-line' may have assisted them.
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    Last edited by PaulGRIMWOOD; 11-04-2005 at 08:00 AM.

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    The cage moves back in to bring the firefighters out of the window.
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    Smile Covering stream for removals etc...

    Taking into account proper placement of aerial devices, ground ladders etc. problems do occur and you have to use what is given to you with respect to equipment, resources and opportunity. I have been to a few "jobs" where the placement of an aerial device or ground ladder had to be near or over a window that could possibly have become a venting situation for smoke/fire. You can't always place the rig or your ground ladders in the most adventageous way to avoid the various problems a dynamic fireground presents...
    Anyway, using the stream to knock down any venting fire to facilitate a removal, rescue or firefighters using the aerial/ground ladder is important as long as interior crews are aware of the tactic or at least notified of your intentions. I can also recommend that all pumping apparatus (yes, engine's AND quint's) be equipped with a master stream ie. Stang etc. so that a pump operator can place that master stream into operation at a moment's notice to prevent extension or venting fire from jeaopardizing crews utilizing that piece for whatever function. I have observed crews in NYC (I was one of those NY Fire Patrol fellow's with the red helmet) using this many times to protect an aerial device or tower ladder bucket that was operating above the fire for VES, rescue, removal or "sticking" the roof for roof ops. When specing' a Quint appratus, do so with the idea that a master stream other than the nozzle that could be on the tip of the aerial, be plumbed onto the apparatus to be used for just that situation. Those preconnected portalbe master streams are nice but cannot be put into operation immediately if the proverbial "S***T hits the fan and you need a protecting stream yesterday....I hope this helps some...

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    Question UK firefighters....

    A career firefighter Lt. friend of mine has a new chief of his department here in New England. His name is Chief Mark Carr from Wadsworth, UK. His is presently the Chief of Department for New Britain Fire Department in Connecticut, USA. He wants to know if anyone knows him or of him????

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