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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captnpat
    If you cut "inspection" holes starting from the uninvolved side to the invovled side, then what happens to your escape route when fire vents from them? - which it will, because you vented it. You always keep your escape route open. You might want to revisit your SOP's.
    Stay safe
    Good to hear a voice of reason, Yaaooo...um, guessing if this is a peaked roof, it must take you a rather good long time to take down and re-position those roof ladders? Oh and what point does making inspection cuts have..two places to vent, over the fire, or as close as you can get.....right?
    FF/NREMT-B

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  2. #22
    Forum Member fireman4949's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yaaooo
    When you first go on the roof you cut an inspection hole. You start at a 45 degree angle from the wall and cut unitl you feel a rafter and then about 6 inches past it. Turn around and cut back toward the wall. Basically cutting a triangle. Pop it out stick youre head in the hole. That will tell you the construction, where the rafters are going and how thinck the roofing material. As you walk toward the fire cut little triangles every few feet. these will help you identify where the fire might be...and the thickness of the roofing material in that area. SInce you guys have the cutter's edge once you know how deep iit is you can select your depth and just cut. If you want a good book on Ventilation check out Truck Company Operations by Ret. Battalion Chief John Mittendorf LAFD.

    ...And when you have an unidentified, potentially hazardous material spill, dip your fingers into the glowing green liquid, sniff vigorously, then taste. Finally, rub the remainder of the product onto your cheeks (either pair). If you suddenly experience a severe burning sensation, your heart rate quadruples and you become short of breath, chances are you have a toxic spill "on your hands"!




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  3. #23
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    I'm deathly afraid of heights and i HATE ladders.... i'm currently in essentials and i had to climb up a ladder on to the roof of a building.... needless to say...i'm glad that part of the class is over for now.

  4. #24
    Forum Member benlewis60's Avatar
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    Back to the original question:

    1)
    If you feel you are lacking when it comes to ladder work you need to tell your Captain that you need some ladder training. Don't wait until you are on scene to tell him you are uncomfortable with something. Fix the problem now so that you can be of use when needed.

    Ladders are a big part of the job yet I always seem to see guys sh*t the bed once they are asked to do anything with them from deployment to rescue.

    There are lots of courses you can take but the better choice is to talk to your Captain. Your department should have set guidelines for deployment and use that you need to know.... learning a different method of deployment from what your department expects could be a problem.


    2) Ventilating a roof is a whole other story from ladders in general. If your department is not training guys to vent a roof, they shouldn't be going up there. Some might even suggest there is no reason for vertical ventilation anyway... but that's for another thread.

    If you need to learn about roofs and can't/won't do it in training with your department i suggest you find a roofer who will let you come have a look as he puts up a roof. or, at least pick up a book. There are a lot of great books on construction related to the fire service.

    If you want to get real funky with it, build some props to practice on. it sounds like you are on a volunteer dept. Ask if you can make some props (all you need to do is frame some joists at the right spacing with plywood on top and covered with shingles). Throw this prop on top of a building you can work on. Then you and others can ladder the building, take the tools and roof ladder up there and cut some holes. practice sounding the roof... finding rafters and practice your cuts.


    As for carrying tools etc to a roof, this too is based on department standards. They may prefer tools to be hoisted for example.


    Basically, I strongly suggest you have a chat with your Captain, T.O or whoever else is responsible for YOUR training and ask to do some of these things. It is good that you are keen to learn but you need to learn inside your department in order to grasp the way they want things done. And frankly... it is their responsibility to train you.

  5. #25
    Forum Member IGotTheJumpSeat's Avatar
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    Practice and you'll become more comfortable on ladders. I really never had a problem with ladders or roofs of high pitch from the start. I have however had an issue in the past of a forcefull, and sudden meeting with the ground, due to gravity, from a second story tin roof.....

  6. #26
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    Okay, to overcome your fear of ladders, just picture everyone around you in their underwear. Wait. That's fear of public speaking. Umm... Ladders.

    Practice. Get up there and get comfortable. The more you are on a ladder, the more comfortable and familiar you will be. I HATED ladders and heights. I did it because I had to. Now, I am comfortable because I spent a lot of time going up, and coming down. Keeep working on it and you will be fine.

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