Thread: Fire-warrior

  1. #1
    cgerdes97
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    Default Fire-warrior

    Has anybody used the FIRE-WARRIOR Micro Thermal Imager (by Morning Pride)? Our command just got a demo one, mounted to a helmet that I was chosen to wear for a month. I am doing the testing on it for the month of November and I was looking to see if anybody had used it before, just for some feedback. I started using today and the first (and only so far) time it has been used is on a Ground Emergency for an aircraft. The aircraft declared Hot Brakes and the temperature display maxed out a 212 degrees farenheit. Seeing as brakes get about that hot during a normal landing, it will not do so good for that specific type of emergency. Working on an Air Force base, we do get alot of Hot Brake emergencies. Anyways, any feedback would help... Thanks.

    Chris

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    I personally don't put a lot of faith in a TI cameras temp readings.I use them as a guide to locate the "hot" spot but we recheck the cameras reading with a Raytek heat gun.I've only "played" with the MP in a non fire enviornment,the monocle took a little getting used to but the picture and field of view was decent.While you've got it spend some time just looking at various objects,motors(both fuel and electric)light fixtures,circuit boxes,heating and cooling units,conveyor bearings,even the rafter areas of the base.You'll begin to see patterns of "normal"and not so normal events.Plus it's good training. Using it in the dark to find "warm"objects can make for an interesting drill.But in order to do a fair evaluation you've got to use it and use other brands to make a valid comparison.Good luck. T.C.

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    I've tried out the MP helmet cam but found it somewhat hard to get used to, and even a bit disorienting, not to mention the added weight to your helmet wether you're using it or not. I prefer handhelds for a lot of reasons. The best one I've seen for your aplication would be the MSA 5200. Its temperature sensor seems to be the most acurate out there because it has a real tight aspect ratio which means that you can get an acurate temp reading on a smaller object from farther away without it taking an "average" of items around what you're looking at. Like 101 said, best thing is to get a few in and try them out side by side. Good luck

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    it is currently not an up-to-date core. The thermal tolerances aren't anywhere near what an ASI3500 core in any camera would be.

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    We have an MSA 5000 and it does a great job. We have used it on many fires and it has many other uses. We have found electrical shorts and even one felony subject hiding in the woods. We have also used it when we arrive on the scene of an MVA. You can determine how many occupants were in a vehicle if you use it quickly after arriving on scene. The price is worth it for firefighter safety alone. Jeff

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    I'm currently doing a 30 day demo of the microcamera myself. We've only had it a couple of shifts and I have not had a fire with it. We have trained with it and I like it way more than our handheld ISG's. I can not feel any additional helmet weight when I where it with an SCBA mask on. The picture in the micro cam is not as good as our ISG's, but having my hands free is well worth the trade off and the picture improves if there is a heat source in the room. The thermometer max on the camera I'm using is 600 degrees...I would think yours would be the same. Also, the micro cam uses two AA batteries...what a relief from those horrible nickel metal rechargeable in the ISG...those weren't worth having (the batteries that is)...the ISG can use AA's also, but I believe it's 8 of them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lieutenant387
    it is currently not an up-to-date core. The thermal tolerances aren't anywhere near what an ASI3500 core in any camera would be.

    I'm not a TIC expert for sure. Can you explain what you mean?

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    An ASI 3500 core is made by Raytheon, the leader in thermal imaging in both the fire service and in the Military. ASI is Amorphopus Silicon and 3500 is the version. For instance the ASI 2500 core is not as good as the 3500 in a LOT of characteristics. Email me and I will give you the specifics on the temperature tolerances.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lieutenant387
    An ASI 3500 core is made by Raytheon, the leader in thermal imaging in both the fire service and in the Military. ASI is Amorphopus Silicon and 3500 is the version. For instance the ASI 2500 core is not as good as the 3500 in a LOT of characteristics. Email me and I will give you the specifics on the temperature tolerances.
    To expound upon this:

    Raytheon is now L3; the TI group was purchased last year. The 3500 AS is the latest core available to fire service manufacturers. It has the capability for colorization, as well as a much higher dynamic range. The detector saturates at 1120 F, meaning that it can show different temperatures up to that before an object "must" be white on the display (or red or whatever max temperature is). The 2500 AS used in the Fire Warrior has a maximum dynamic range of 600 F (thus the 600 F temperature bar). It cannot differentiate any temperatures above that.

    The image quality on the 3500 is better in general, especially since the 2500 is a 20 Hz refresh rate and the 3500 is a 30 Hz refresh rate. A movie in a theater runs at 24 fps (or Hz), so anything above that is essentially invisible to the human eye.
    My comments are sometimes educated, sometimes informed and sometimes just blowing smoke...but they are always mine and mine alone and do not reflect upon anyone else (especially my employer).

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