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    Default 5 inch hose clamps

    Can you use a 5 inch hose clamp on LDH. I have heard it is bad and would like to remove them from our rigs. any ideas or comments would be great.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKvolFF
    Can you use a 5 inch hose clamp on LDH. I have heard it is bad and would like to remove them from our rigs. any ideas or comments would be great.
    Well, since you have them I guess they can be used. I dont see a need for them. Weve had 5" since I started in '83 and have never had clamps for it.
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    We carry them but they are seldom used. One problem that I have seen with them is the locking mechnisum, which can cause the upper half to spring open if not seated correctly. We have the screw type clamps for the 5" lines. We do not even have any of the older style clamps.
    Last edited by BFDLT32; 11-17-2005 at 12:11 AM.
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    Care to elaborate on what exactly is "bad"?

    If the hose clamps were designed for 5" LDH, wouldn't it make sense to use them on 5" LDH? Perhaps that's too obvious?

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    I dont have any documents, but I will tell you that placing a clamp on 5" hose is very dangerous. Firefighters trying to unclamp the hose have been hurt and many of them have landed in the hospital due to the 5" clamp. It's allot of pressure building up on the clamp, and when someone goes to unclamp the hose you have a loaded spring, that could bite you.

    My department has taken both 3" & 5" off our trucks.

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    We carry the screw down type and have used them in the past. The only problem we have had is when you start to loosen it, it has a tendency to slide down the hose. Alot safer than the lever type that has to be unlatched. while holding down on the arm. I would be very concerned about using that type.

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    The screw jack hose clamps are not as dangerous as the lever kind, but I have never really understood the concept to begin with. Whoever is expecting the water at the other end is still not going to get it. Seems like it would be just as easy and safer to turn it off at the source. Not to mention the water hammer your going to get when you release it.

    All of ours are in the supply closet, waiting to get lost.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ranburne
    We carry the screw down type and have used them in the past. The only problem we have had is when you start to loosen it, it has a tendency to slide down the hose. Alot safer than the lever type that has to be unlatched. while holding down on the arm. I would be very concerned about using that type.
    Along with the clamp sliding along the hose when the clamp loosened, I have seen the clamp (properly placed on the hose the tightened) slide down the length of the hose as the 5 inch supply line was charged. We had never seen that before with the woven jacket hose but we had switched over to a rubber jacket and the clamp no longer had any grip on the hose.

    We no longer clamp 5 inch hose and the clamps are now museum pieces.

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    We have used screw down LDH clamps without incident for years. SOP say the engine laying the line will immediately clamp the line 20 feet from the truck upon dismounting. This allows the hydrant person to immediately start water, while the engineer break the line and makes the connection, which at times requires either flaking out a buncho of hose or using a pony roll to complete the connection. The screw clamp, can move if the water comes to quickly, but generally doesn't move more than a few feet (the reason for the 20' rule). When you arrive short staffed its easy for the operator to get caught doing other things before securing the hydrant supply line. We've never had an issue with unscrewing the clamp (reminds me of a lightbulb/preganancy joke). We also have had issues with broken hydrant stems where the clamp was needed to shut down the water to remove the truck, so I would atleast carry one in case you need it.

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    I know that we purchased them for one specific reason, and that was when we had some bad hydants that would not shut off in the County during winter months.

    We have not used them on any other situation and probably won't. Although they are the screw down type, they do seem to slide down the hose.


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    I agree with you,LT.
    The times I've caught the plug,I just grabbed the end of the line with the hydrant bag,took off the caps,flushed out the plug and then installed the Storz fitting and 2 1/2"gate valve and waited for the word to charge the line.
    While I was doing my thing,the rest of the crew still had to break the line to whatever length was needed,so I never saw a need to clamp the hydrant end if it wasn't gaining any time for us to do so.
    As to the lever versus screws,I worked on the river out of Memphis for 7 years and learned to stay out of"the line of fire"when releasing anything under tension.Rachets are just as dangerous as a lever clamp.

    Quote Originally Posted by MemphisE34a
    The screw jack hose clamps are not as dangerous as the lever kind, but I have never really understood the concept to begin with. Whoever is expecting the water at the other end is still not going to get it. Seems like it would be just as easy and safer to turn it off at the source. Not to mention the water hammer your going to get when you release it.

    All of ours are in the supply closet, waiting to get lost.

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    We carry them but in twelve years I have never used one. I believe the reason we carry them is ISO gives you a couple of points for carrying them. However their is some equipment we don't have that I would much rather carry on the rigs.

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    It's allot of pressure
    In my area, 5" LDH coming off a hydrant has about 50psi. 2.5" coming off a hydrant has about 50psi. Releasing the clamp on either line would involve the same pressures.
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    Like a few of you said, I have only seen a clamp used once when the hydrant would not shut off and we had to break off the pumper. There was no problem in removing the clamp.
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    You can run up to 200psi with a screw type LDH clamp and release it with no issues.It might move a bit but once open easily removed.We use them on the Engine end of the hose,not the hydrant same as RFD.Very handy if you have a length fail on a long lay to "patch"in a new length. T.C.

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    I don't see how a signicfigant amount of time is saved by placing a clamp on the hose when hooking the hydrant. Taking the time to place a clamp and set it seems (to me anyway) to take longer than just pulling the rest of the hose and hooking in. As far as the use of the clamp. I would rather not use it. The shear volume of water under pressure can make for a dangerous situation if not properly handled. There are only a limited number of reasons to use it and I would do so only in a water supply emergency, not daily use.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RFDACM
    SOP say the engine laying the line will immediately clamp the line 20 feet from the truck upon dismounting.
    I assume this is so the FF at the plug will be able to return the the scene faster, Or so you can control the hydrant closer to the pumper?

    To me it sounds like a waste of time. When I lay a line, I am supposed to have my tank water to hydrant water in under 2 min. That includes disconnecting the supply line fron the hose bed and connecting it to the shorty on the keystone. I think the FF can wait 2 min at the plug for me to do a change over rather me fumble with a hose clamp.

    Just my opinion!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmitchell
    I assume this is so the FF at the plug will be able to return the the scene faster, Or so you can control the hydrant closer to the pumper?

    To me it sounds like a waste of time. When I lay a line, I am supposed to have my tank water to hydrant water in under 2 min. That includes disconnecting the supply line fron the hose bed and connecting it to the shorty on the keystone. I think the FF can wait 2 min at the plug for me to do a change over rather me fumble with a hose clamp.

    Just my opinion!!
    You hit it on the head. It is so the water can be started quicker. But given our lack of adequate staffing there may not be a hydrant firefighter. Therefore SOP also says you may not pass an undreesed hydrant, you must stop make it up and flow the water. Granted this SOP was before we all carried portable radios and may outlive its usefulness. But our driver/operator may get water to the first line and then leave the panel. It is rare for the lay to be short enough for them to get their own water, so the task falls to the second due engine to provide the supply line. Our principle her is to get the first line in operation first and foremost. Its worked well for many years. But have a firefighter wait up to 2 min for you to make a connection so you don't have to be inconvienced by fumbling with a hose clamp. Sounds like a waste of a good firefighters talent and time. I'd rather have them in the building.

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    We have a few old ones in the engineer's closet. We keep them around "in case" we have a bad hydrant or similar. I've also heard of them used at a large, long incident to enable a section of 5" to be deflated so that apparatus could move over it (Cringe). It isn't a bad thing to have sitting around, but if it is locked in a closet, no one will be able to get to it if it is needed.

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    But given our lack of adequate staffing there may not be a hydrant firefighter
    With those circumstances, doing that might not be a bad idea. I may not agree with it, but if it works for your department then that is what matters. Every dept has their way of doing things and everyone will always have their own opinion on the fire service.

    But have a firefighter wait up to 2 min for you to make a connection so you don't have to be inconvienced by fumbling with a hose clamp. Sounds like a waste of a good firefighters talent and time. I'd rather have them in the building.
    Yes that is true in a smaller dept. Here we have 30 - 70 firefighters dispatched depending on the structure. The rookie on the second in pumper will be the one at the plug, most likely not an experienced FF. But like I said, every dept is different and we all have a way that works for us. If the clamp works for you then keep doing what your doing.
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    We have them on all our apparatus. However, I personally don't know of a single instance where one has been used.




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    Quote Originally Posted by orangebuster
    I know that we purchased them for one specific reason, and that was when we had some bad hydants that would not shut off in the County during winter months.
    We carry a water key to turn the hydrant off at the street in this situation. If that doesn't work, we call MLGW and have them shut the main off from another location.

    What do you do? Leave a section of hose thats clamped off in the street until you can get someone else to turn the plug off for you? Not me.
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    Default new recruit soon

    well i wanted to know what's the paper exam is about, I'am a new recruit and I want to really just be informed about information about the exam, I'm not worried about the physical exam because i no i can past that it's just I'am a young guy who wants to help people, and I think fire fighter's are the best people to do it i would very much appriciate your reponse sir or miss thank u

    contact me a my email jusblaze17@msn.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dmillz
    well i wanted to know what's the paper exam is about, I'am a new recruit and I want to really just be informed about information about the exam, I'm not worried about the physical exam because i no i can past that it's just I'am a young guy who wants to help people, and I think fire fighter's are the best people to do it i would very much appriciate your reponse sir or miss thank u

    contact me a my email jusblaze17@msn.com
    Hey pal. I think you posted in the wrong thread, and before you advance too far in your fire department career, you may want to concentrate on English.
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    Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

    "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

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