Thread: LODD #1 Cause

  1. #1
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    N.E. Iowa
    Posts
    179

    Post LODD #1 Cause

    We spend much time on this forum discussing LODD's, as we should. But I am sure everyone here knows what the leading cause of Firefighter LODD's is. What are your thoughts on this issue and what are you and your Department doing to improve the situation???

  2. #2
    EuroFirefighter.com
    PaulGRIMWOOD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    831

    Default

    'Traumatic injuries' is the leading cause of US firefighters deaths and this is on the increase. Heart attacks are the second highest cause of LODDs but this is steadily on the decrease as a cause and is well below the average cause of death when compared with the general 'non-firefighter' population.

    A lot can be still done to reduce BOTH LODD stat's.

    Members with prior heart conditions should not be actively serving and all firehouses should get a Coram patented fitness centre/juice bar to encourage a structured and healthy lifestyle.

  3. #3
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    102

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulGRIMWOOD
    'Members with prior heart conditions should not be actively serving and all firehouses should get a Coram patented fitness centre/juice bar to encourage a structured and healthy lifestyle.

    I guess the 40 inch TV is optional


    JOn

  4. #4
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    235

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulGRIMWOOD
    'Traumatic injuries' is the leading cause of US firefighters deaths and this is on the increase. Heart attacks are the second highest cause of LODDs but this is steadily on the decrease as a cause and is well below the average cause of death when compared with the general 'non-firefighter' population.
    I'm not sure where you got your data. For 2004, 66 out of 117 LODDs were the result of "Stress and Overexertion" (Source: US Fire Administration)

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    608

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HM604OH
    I'm not sure where you got your data. For 2004, 66 out of 117 LODDs were the result of "Stress and Overexertion" (Source: US Fire Administration)
    Our department has implemented a welness program and a physical fitness coordinator.

    We've been going in for physicals and been getting PT tests every year for the past five or six years.

    They've been able to get some good stats and records on us. If nothing else it motivates a lot of us to get on the ball if we are doing poorly.

    I think all the stations have work out equipment now. Getting an old fart like me to work out is another problem.

    Hard to give up chicken fried deer backstrap and catfish.

  6. #6
    EuroFirefighter.com
    PaulGRIMWOOD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    831

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HM604OH
    I'm not sure where you got your data. For 2004, 66 out of 117 LODDs were the result of "Stress and Overexertion" (Source: US Fire Administration)
    Yes 2004 was a dramatic year in the stats for 'over exertion' victims (not all but mostly due to heart attacks). But if you go back over the past decade the heart attack LODDs totalled 44%. Approximately 2 firefighters go LODD per 100,000 fires through heart attack .... this increases to over 2.3 firefighters for traumatic injuries (inside structures) .... over past ten years.

  7. #7
    Forum Member
    Bones42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Pt. Beach, NJ
    Posts
    10,682

    Default

    Also note, heart attacks that occur within 24 hours of the incident are now being considered LODD, at least in NJ. This only started in the last year or two.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  8. #8
    Forum Member
    DixieFire53's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Gulfport MS
    Posts
    161

    Red face

    Our department is doing absolutely nothing! Our city is scared of the liability if a firefighter has a heart attack during any type of exercise, and is to cheap to send us to an annual physical. Now that hurricane Katrina as wipe out our city this will not change anytime soon.
    DixieFire53, Deputy Fire Chief FF/EMT-P, Local 272

  9. #9
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Nevada, TX, U-S-A!!
    Posts
    417

    Default

    My department pays to have the batteries in my pace-maker changed every year. Does that count as helping? I am just kidding of course.

    I know this is a serious subject, but some of our departments cant afford a pot to **** in or a window to throw it out of. Excersize equipment is the farthest thing from our minds. We, as individuals, notice how exhausted we are after a hard call and that is our motivation to stay fit.

    I think a greater emphasis on wellness/physical training is in need, but how do you do that when we are already strapped for personel?

  10. #10
    55 Years & Still Rolling
    hwoods's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Glenn Dale Md, Heart of the P.G. County Fire Belt....
    Posts
    10,739

    Smile I Disagree..........

    I have to respectfully disagree with some of what I've read from other posts, including posts in other threads on this subject. THE REST OF THE WORLD NEEDS TO BUTT OUT OF MY LIFESTYLE. I happen to be quite healthy and in very good shape for my age (64). I have a thorough physical on a regular basis, most recent was last month, which include the requirements for a CDL Drivers License which I currently hold. CDL Physicals are tougher than most folks realize, and my Doc is very good at finding anything that needs attention. Point here is that a person needs an ADEQUATE checkup, on a regular basis, and they need to follow their doctors advice. When Doctor Dave tells me to get off the rig, I'll get off, I am not getting off because of other people's opinion of how the rules should read. I do not agree that someone with a prior Heart Attack should automatically be removed from active status. I DO agree that such a person should be guided by his/her doctor's advice. I'll say what no one else wants to admit, We will never attain a zero LODD year in America's Fire Service. It is an admirable goal, and I support doing what is reasonable to reduce the numbers, but there are a few folks out there who are starting to look a bit more than reasonable in their ideas for attaining such a goal.
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
    In memory of
    Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
    Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

    IACOJ Budget Analyst

    I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

    www.gdvfd18.com

  11. #11
    EuroFirefighter.com
    PaulGRIMWOOD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    831

    Default

    Over the past 25 years, medical documentation has been available for 670 of the 1,236 firefighter heart attack victims. Of those 670 victims, 49.1 percent had had prior heart attacks or bypass surgery and another 31.3 percent had severe arteriosclerotic heart disease. Another 12.7 percent had hypertension or diabetes.

    I find those statistics pretty alarming. However, without wishing to be right .... or voicing an unpopular opinion .... or at the risk of causing any colleagues offense .... I think the matter is worthy of debate.

    What we are talking about are -

    1. The right to one's freedom of choice. One chooses to do the job, with a medical history of heart related problems, and one has the right to do so. Beyond question in most situations I would imagine.

    2. Whether that 'right' should be taken away, for whatever reason.

    Now I respect anybody's decision, where able, to serve a community as a firefighter or active chief for as long as that person wants to do the job. I would secretly like to see myself doing the same. However, is that person potentially putting the lives of colleagues at any risk? That depends on what situations that firefighter is likely to find him/herself in.

    If a firefighter/chief is able to undertake fire-ground duties from an exterior and safe position then I don't see a major problem as long as ICS is maintained. If that person expects to operate on the interior of burning structures then I do see an issue here.

    With deepest of respect.
    Last edited by PaulGRIMWOOD; 11-16-2005 at 12:09 PM.

  12. #12
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Nevada, TX, U-S-A!!
    Posts
    417

    Default

    Well I must admit, there are definitely parts of the operation in which someone with medical problems can help the department. I would just worry about someone who has had a heart attack agressively fighting fire for more than a short time. Not saying they cant go back after a short rest and a check-up (after all, we already have EMS onscene for rehab in most cases), but no long periods of time humping hose and working their tails off. A direct, labor intensive, attack on a fire runs healthy young lads down. I can only imagine how someone who is 300 lbs, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and weak heart may feel. There is more to fighting fire than charging in with a hose, and some of those jobs are perfect for those of us who are less fit than others.

    It not only poses a threat to the well-being of the out of shape member, but it also endangers those in which he is paired up with. If a 300 lb guy has fallen, it is up to the other guy to try and drag him to safety. Some of us wont leave a guy, so we may die along with him because we are doing all we can to help him. Not a risk we should have to take.

    We have several guys who are either a little bigger, or a little older, and sometimes bigger and older. Our department would suffer greatly if any of these individuals were cut because they didn't fit in the "mold" of what a physically fit guy represents.

    With that said, I would not support a physical requirement to be ON the department. But I would support a physical test to determine what all the person is allowed to do at the scene. If you cant pass basic skills and physical tests, you should pick another duty that you would be more of a help performing.
    Last edited by RadRob; 11-16-2005 at 11:53 AM.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. FF Injuries and LODD in Canada
    By Temptaker in forum Canada
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-09-2003, 08:26 PM
  2. Inappropriate ads on LODD pages
    By Aumack in forum Firehouse.Com Site Comments
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 09-10-2001, 11:15 AM
  3. What should count as a LODD?
    By mongofire_99 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 09-08-2001, 12:03 AM
  4. Texas LODD initiative sabotaged by Chiefs
    By The Mole in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-22-2001, 11:21 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register