Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Forum Member Dubbsy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Page, ND
    Posts
    36

    Default Light/Siren wiring information? 1980 F150

    Wondering if there are any installers with some good information stored in the back of their head (or have a good direction to point me in).

    Have a 1980 Ford F150 (believe it also dons the Ranger badge) brush truck that was put together (very poorly) by a former chief.

    Light bar is an Impulse 2000 (Southern Vehicle Products)
    Siren control is a Classic SA450 (Southern Vehicle Products)
    Radio is a Motorola MaxTrac 300


    I was digging through the shotty wiring job and noticed there were a few wires both from the back of the siren control and in the harness to the light bar that were not used and/or cut.


    Light bar works (simple switched single wire feed)
    Siren and 'air horn' works
    'Radio' setting does not work however. Here's an additional question - what is that ~supposed~ to be? Is it supposed to transmit radio traffic from the motorola if it's set up properly (I ~think~ our F550 rescue is set up this way) or is it supposed to transmit via the accompanying mic as a loud speaker?



    Wondering if some of those mystery wires will make the 'radio' work. Also curious what they're supposed to be doing incase I re-wire the truck.

    (mainly curious what all the wires are in the harness running to the bar, and what the white wire is for out of the control box)



    No idea where the papers are for the equipment.
    Last edited by Dubbsy; 12-24-2005 at 01:59 AM.
    Justin W
    Volunteer Page Fire/Rescue & Ambulance - Page, ND
    NREMT-B


  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Posts
    83

    Default

    Hey there.. can you contact me with the colours of the wiring that is in the back of the siren box. I may be able to help you.

    Professionally yours.
    Jason
    Jason.
    Career Paramedic/Volunteer Firefighter
    Saving Lives or Basements everyday.
    Member of the IACOJ

    Goalies are the best btw :P

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    466

    Default

    Radio is just that it, if your radio is connected to your siren control head, it will rebroadcast your radio traffic over your siren speaker. It could very well be the wires that are cut.

  4. #4
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    73

    Default

    I install this type of equipment for a living. Take my word for it - you do NOT want those radio wires connected. I personally do not cut the wires, I remove them from the wiring harness connecter all together. This prevents someone from connecting them in the future. What this will do is rebroadcast the radio through the siren speaker. This will cause anybody that tries to talk on a portable in the vicinity of your apparatus to get immediate feedback. It will also cause the siren to burn out if it is left in that position for an extended period of time on a busy channel on the radio. I wouldn't do it.

    As far as light bar wires being cut, chances are they are just extras (sometimes called spares) in the cable. Lightbars are wired with a standard cable (say 10 conductors) and usually need less than 5. The extra bunch of them are in case you add takedowns, alley lights, traffic preemption, flashers, etc.

    You should find three seperate fused circuits powering the accessories you speak of. The radio should probably be fused at 15 amps (20 maybe), the siren at 15, and the lightbar between 20-30. The most important thing you can do (especially if there is nothing wrong with it - everything works) is to simple make sure every circuit has a fuse on it. This will prevent your vehicle from burning down.

    Let me know if you need anything else.

    Jon

  5. #5
    Forum Member nmfire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Maryland (DC Suburb)
    Posts
    5,738

    Default

    ^^ What he said.
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

  6. #6
    Forum Member Dubbsy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Page, ND
    Posts
    36

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chiefeng7
    As far as light bar wires being cut, chances are they are just extras (sometimes called spares) in the cable. Lightbars are wired with a standard cable (say 10 conductors) and usually need less than 5. The extra bunch of them are in case you add takedowns, alley lights, traffic preemption, flashers, etc.

    You should find three seperate fused circuits powering the accessories you speak of. The radio should probably be fused at 15 amps (20 maybe), the siren at 15, and the lightbar between 20-30. The most important thing you can do (especially if there is nothing wrong with it - everything works) is to simple make sure every circuit has a fuse on it. This will prevent your vehicle from burning down.

    I figured some of them had to be extras for something.

    As for the radio on the speaker, I'll keep that in mind. It's a function I found very useful on scene of a structure fire and I was jumping out of the truck quick between times talking to dispatch or mutual aid units, however we can just leave that function to our F550 then.

    So here's an additional question. What setting does it take to broadcast over the speaker via the mic with the siren control? I've noticed that on atleast 2 of our trucks that does not work (both trucks wired by the same guy - a trend maybe? heh)


    All circuts are currently fused but I'll have to look again at what fuses were used.

    Quite a few things concern me about that truck's wiring right now.
    I'm not sure of the power rating of our switches and if they're going to hold up long term to the power they're seeing (I've burnt up switches of my own before, don't want to do it on a firetruck too). I think I'd much rather run relays; or is it better to run heavy duty switches?

    Wiring is strung all over in the wrong places and is easily tangled in bunker boots (all the wire is bundled up on that side of the trans tunnel).

    Splices everywhere.



    I'll take a look at the truck again next week and see what else I can come up with. (grab some wire colors while I"m at it)
    Justin W
    Volunteer Page Fire/Rescue & Ambulance - Page, ND
    NREMT-B

  7. #7
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    73

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dubbsy
    So here's an additional question. What setting does it take to broadcast over the speaker via the mic with the siren control? I've noticed that on atleast 2 of our trucks that does not work (both trucks wired by the same guy - a trend maybe? heh)
    Typically this is not something that can be affected by the installer. The mics may all be broken, the PTT switches may all be broken, etc. I have personally found that they do not really go bad and if they don't work, its an internal problem to the siren.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dubbsy
    All circuts are currently fused but I'll have to look again at what fuses were used.

    Quite a few things concern me about that truck's wiring right now.
    I'm not sure of the power rating of our switches and if they're going to hold up long term to the power they're seeing (I've burnt up switches of my own before, don't want to do it on a firetruck too). I think I'd much rather run relays; or is it better to run heavy duty switches?

    Wiring is strung all over in the wrong places and is easily tangled in bunker boots (all the wire is bundled up on that side of the trans tunnel).

    Splices everywhere.
    Wellll.... most switches have power ratings right on them. Thats the easiest way to tell if they are under-rated or not. How many switches are there? One for the lightbar? What else is there? Typically anything over 10 amps I put on a relay - 30A fog light relays work great for this purpose and are only like $5. Just watch out for starter relays as they are NOT continuous duty. I know a good story that goes with that...

    Anyway... wire runs should:
    A) Be in split loom tubing.
    B) Be secured to the vehicle no less than every 12"
    C) Not have any splices in them unnecessarily.

    Anytime wiring needs to be spliced, it should be soldered and shrink tubed - or - butt spliced with a pressure crimper (not what most people use) and shrink tubed. Use heat shrink tubing with the 'glue' on the inside - seals a lot better/keeps moisture out.

    Good luck,
    Jon

  8. #8
    Forum Member Dubbsy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Page, ND
    Posts
    36

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chiefeng7
    Typically this is not something that can be affected by the installer. The mics may all be broken, the PTT switches may all be broken, etc. I have personally found that they do not really go bad and if they don't work, its an internal problem to the siren.
    Well I guess my first question is when is it 'supposed to work'? Is it supposed to override the siren or only work on certain settings?


    Wellll.... most switches have power ratings right on them. Thats the easiest way to tell if they are under-rated or not. How many switches are there? One for the lightbar? What else is there? Typically anything over 10 amps I put on a relay - 30A fog light relays work great for this purpose and are only like $5. Just watch out for starter relays as they are NOT continuous duty. I know a good story that goes with that...
    Currently 2 switches, 1 for the light bar and 1 for power to both the radio and siren (which I can almost guarantee is under-rated). Ideally I'd have the radio and siren switch on with the key, but that's another day another time I think.

    The switch I put in recently to replace a bad one (toggle switches) was, if I remember right, a 20A for the light bar and I believe that circuit has a 20A fuse. The other switch was not marked unfortunately.

    Other thing I'm really not too fond of with the truck, and one of the bigger reasons I was interested in what the extra wires were for in the harness; he ran that harness from the trans tunned by the fire wall across under the carpet to the front outside corner of the seat - directly across the foot well/floor pan area. May have to extend that harness to run it right.

    Thanks for the help! Maybe I'll head up there tomorrow to 'get out of the house' for a while and see what else I can come up with.
    Justin W
    Volunteer Page Fire/Rescue & Ambulance - Page, ND
    NREMT-B

  9. #9
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    73

    Default

    If the radio and siren (or even one of them) have ignition control wires connected to that switch (and +12V connected direct all the time), the switch may not be over-rated. Otherwise, watch out!

    Good luck.

    Jon

  10. #10
    MembersZone Subscriber N2DFire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    S.W. Virginia
    Posts
    1,286

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chiefeng7
    If the radio and siren (or even one of them) have ignition control wires connected to that switch (and +12V connected direct all the time), the switch may not be over-rated. Otherwise, watch out!

    Good luck.

    Jon
    Once again - what he said.

    I know that pretty much all the "flavors" of the Maxtrac come standard as "Constant On" - meaning you plug up the large 2 wire power leads to a constant source and the radio is on all the time unless you turn off the knob.

    To have it switch or ignition controlled - there is an internal fuse that has to be cut and then a 12V "signal" lead has to be attached to one of the pins on the accessory connector on the rear of the unit. Once this is done - the radio control knob can remain "On" but the unit will only power up whenever the signal lead is energized (either by a separate switch from your control area or by an Ignition Hot lead - your choice).

    Your best source of quality FREE information on the Maxtrac (or anything /\/\otorola for that matter) is www.batlabs.com - be sure to visit the Installer section of their forums as well - lots of great info there)

    Feel free to e-mail me or post back here if you have further questions, but if the guys at Batlabs can't find you an answer - I'm willing to bet there's no answer to be found.
    Take Care - Stay Safe - God Bless
    Stephen
    FF/Paramedic
    Instructor

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Looking for information...
    By ffmedicmo in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-28-2003, 01:52 PM
  2. Oregon- Minister-ette of Information
    By NJFFSA16 in forum Wildland Firefighting
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-20-2002, 02:46 AM
  3. Houston's LODD Politics
    By 1261Truckie in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 102
    Last Post: 02-24-2002, 02:25 AM
  4. Clean Air Act 112(r) communication requirements
    By Alan Bernstein in forum Emergency Services Administration
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-30-1998, 10:07 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts