1. #1
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    Default fire service badge symbols

    The center crest of my badge has a series of symbols on it and I've been asked by my captain to find out what they all stand for and the symbolism behind them all. I've looked everywhere and have asked many people and have received no answers so any help would be appreciated. The symbols are as follows:
    Ladder: pretty easy to figure out by looking at it, but does it symbolize anything. Are there any special reasons it's on our badge
    Hook on a pole: I don't know what the name of the hook is but same thing as the ladder
    Helmet: Same thing, anything special I should know about
    Bugle: There appears to be two bugles but I'm sure there is only one and the other is something else. I need both
    Lantern/torch: I actually found out what this symbolizes. It was carried in front of the horse drawn apparatus back in the 1800s to light the way and to light the street lights.

    Anyways thanks for the help

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    You have a badge and don't know what the hook on the pole is called?

    Quote Originally Posted by hell2pai
    The center crest of my badge has a series of symbols on it and I've been asked by my captain to find out what they all stand for and the symbolism behind them all. I've looked everywhere and have asked many people and have received no answers so any help would be appreciated. The symbols are as follows:
    Ladder: pretty easy to figure out by looking at it, but does it symbolize anything. Are there any special reasons it's on our badge
    Hook on a pole: I don't know what the name of the hook is but same thing as the ladder
    Helmet: Same thing, anything special I should know about
    Bugle: There appears to be two bugles but I'm sure there is only one and the other is something else. I need both
    Lantern/torch: I actually found out what this symbolizes. It was carried in front of the horse drawn apparatus back in the 1800s to light the way and to light the street lights.

    Anyways thanks for the help

  3. #3
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FireMedAS
    You have a badge and don't know what the hook on the pole is called?
    He's brand new to the fire service and is asking for help...how about helping him instead of busting his ba11s.

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    If you know then speak up. It's not a pike pole and it's not a hayward. It's unlike anything that is used in the fire service anymore. It was probably used back in the 1800s, and It's not common knowledge because I've asked veterans in the department and they don't know the name of it.

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    Without seeing it I would still say its a pike pole. Maybe an earlier version with a larger hook. It my be some type of hook with line on a pole that was use to pull down walls. (Like trying to make a fire break.)

    The two horns are likely a speaking trumpet and a play pipe.

    There are many version of the scramble design. I don't where you are but try some fire museums.
    Last edited by batchief99; 01-06-2006 at 12:10 AM.

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    I'm not positive, but when I think of bugles, I think of funerals before they used bagpipes.

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    The bugle possibly is a reference to the speaking trumpet used by officers to communicate on the fireground. Hell2pai, could you post a pic. Maybe seeing the badge will help folks answer your question.

  8. #8
    capfiremedic
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    Prolly a halberd... was a weapon that the pike pole was derived from. The pointed end was for poking into your target, and the hook was intended to cut bridles from horses from mounted troops so they'd lose control of their horse

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    Quote Originally Posted by hell2pai View Post
    If you know then speak up. It's not a pike pole and it's not a hayward. It's unlike anything that is used in the fire service anymore. It was probably used back in the 1800s, and It's not common knowledge because I've asked veterans in the department and they don't know the name of it.
    I am not sure of the name of the HOOK device ,it IS based upon a ancient weapon, Halburt? and the underside "curved hook was larger then the "pike" end.... a PIKE was also an ancient weapon like a spear hence pike pole which is simpler then halpike the larger hook was used in the 16 and early 1700's in concert with portable ladders to reach, an pull off Thatch rooves when the chimney deposited embers upon it and caught fire , "The HOOks and Ladders" were stowed in various neighborhoods in ye olde borough near the meeting house where ione could also sound the alarm with the bells , to "throw out your buckets" with time the Hook or pike pole and all the tools it has become were tramsformed to better do the same and eventually Other similar jobs caused by the changes in building construction , the horn(s) were a simble of Rank and power since someone had to be in charge and who ever it was needed to bellow orders and be heard...

    "Apparatus" or "trucks" as we still call it today and "machines" or eventually "engines" grew from ladders and hooks only klong enough to do a story or so into large enough to go 2, 3, 4 storys as well as duplexes and larger multi family which required More and bigger equiptment and a way to carry it from piling it on the ladder to attaching "trucks" to making a wheeled cart to adding a tiller to steer the rear too... They were not very technical, unlike "machines" which required a tad of hydralic knowledge to get water to move through it.. so you often hear even today that engine or pipemen are "smarter" while truckies are bigger brawnier hence no need of education... naturally bunk.. often on the modern badge/maltese a hydrant
    is shown, if "traditional", itmay appear less like modern hydrants and more like the wooden "plugs" which were a couple generations above an actual wooden plug Like you might find in your haz mat kit and would have been hammered into a hole in the wooden Main... Firesfighting is so traditional that we still use terms from 300-350 years ago language is funny how the more it changes the more it stays the same after all the Maltese Cross itself is nearly 900 years old a symbol of the bravery of the Knights who settled in Malta after the Crusades who became known for the bravery they should and compassion for they're fellow Christian Knights when attacked using Napthia set alight by the Muslems risked life and limb to save fellow knights after they're been effectivly napalmed , the Maltese Cross they used was Longer or better yet our form was shortened to fit better since we wereusing siome form of shield or badge a LOT smaller then They carried it on....

    The scramble is often found in the center of a standard badge and often has the ladder and hook and the tools of the trade stuff yor talking about the scramble is moderized used on buttons and other places seals etc.. and placement of tools can vary or be varied by request of say the department hope this helps.. even as late as it is....J

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    So does anyone know what the pole with the round ball is in some scrambles?
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    Yep. The "round ball on a pole" is actually a torch on a pole. Think of it as one of those round "smudge pots" with a wick that were used many, many years ago instead of warning flashers at construction sites. This smaller round torch was swivel-mounted to the end of a pole (to keep it level and prevent the fuel from spilling out) and carried before the responding hand-drawn fire apparatus. You can see photos of them on some antique fire equipment websites.

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    The round ball is indeed representative of an early torch. I have also seen scrambles with one or two tormentor poles in them.

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