1. #1
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    Default Initial Response Tool Kit

    Ok team, time for another "brain stormin" session. Our new heavy rescue has a compartment in the front step bumper that I want to put a small tool kit in that a responder can easily grab-n-go with as they initially approach the scene. Keeping in mind that this truck actually has a fully stocked tool box on board to provide about any tool you COULD need... I want to have this "jump kit" to have the minimum tools for a critical situation. This could mean a situation where you need to deal with something quickly, or when you have such a mess, that you may not have time to get back to the tool box right away.

    So, here are some items that I have come up with:

    Window punch
    Medic shears
    Safety belt cutter
    Rescue knife
    12" Pro-bar and/or 14" pry bar
    Cable cutter pliars
    Rescue hammer
    Large flat head screwdriver
    Combination screw driver
    Box end wrenches (size to match those on battery terminal connections)
    Medium Vice-Grips
    Roll of furnace tape ("Duct tape")
    12' section of tubular webbing

    Am I missing anything obvious, or is there some nifty tool you have in a jump kit like this that has really come in handy?

    Also... if anyone uses a jump tool kit, what kind of box or bag do recommend we get to keep this stuff in?
    Last edited by MetalMedic; 01-07-2006 at 07:35 PM.
    Richard Nester
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by MetalMedic
    Ok team, time for another "brain stormin" session. Our new heavy rescue has a compartment in the front step bumper that I want to put a small tool kit in that a responder can easily grab-n-go with as they initially approach the scene. Keeping in mind that this truck actually has a fully stocked tool box on board to provide about any tool you COULD need... I want to have this "jump kit" to have the minimum tools for a critical situation. This could mean a situation where you need to deal with something quickly, or when you have such a mess, that you may not have time to get back to the tool box right away.

    So, here are some items that I have come up with:

    Window punch
    Medic shears
    Safety belt cutter
    Rescue knife
    12" Pro-bar and/or 14" pry bar
    Cable cutter pliars
    Rescue hammer
    Large flat head screwdriver
    Combination screw driver
    Box end wrenches (size to match those on battery terminal connections)
    Medium Vice-Grips
    Roll of furnace tape ("Duct tape")
    12' section of tubular webbing

    Am I missing anything obvious, or is there some nifty tool you have in a jump kit like this that has really come in handy?

    Also... if anyone uses a jump tool kit, what kind of box or bag do recommend we get to keep this stuff in?
    I'm assuming your talking primarily about vehicle rescue.

    Simple is best...Don't duplicate tools. If you have a pair of crash shears, why do you need a seatbelt cutter?

    If you have cable cutters (and this kit is for rapid intervention use), loose the wrenches.

    My point is that the fewer tools carried the better if they can get the same results. Most tools can be used for different applications. The key is to figure out exactly what you need, then stock the box with the best quality tools available. It really sucks when a pair of $5 cable cutters twist when cutting a battery cable. The $20 ones look like a pretty good investment when that happens.

    By the way, Try to stay away from the "does it all" multi-use rescue tools...They usually don't.




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    I have to agree, don't duplicate tools if your looking at putting together a small kit. I would have cable cutters, window punch, medic shears, screwdrivers, 2 or 3 vise grips, webbing, 100mph duct tape don't use the cheap 50mph duct tape cause you want the good stuff, and some soft protection for the patient ( small tarp or blanket).

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    Check out the "Crash Kit" made by Howell.

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    I posted our "interior rescuer bag" contents somewhere on here, but now I can't find it. Pictures would be better... 304's in a photo mood of late, maybe he will deliver.

    Anyhow, our bag is similar, MM. Some PPE is in there for occupants, I think there are some ear protection, eye protection, and dust masks.

    We also added construction crayons to mark areas (never been used yet to my knowledge), trim removal tools, res-q-wrenches, disposable blanket... can't remember what else off the top of my head.

    The bag is a small clamshell style work bag from THE HOME DEPOT. One is on the rescue engine, the other on the ambo
    Last edited by Resq14; 01-08-2006 at 08:51 PM.
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    Have to agree with the trim removal tools. We have a handful(literally what a hand could grab out of the case) of mini (like 5" long) flat pry bars and a handful of those small nail pullers, the ones with the screw driver handle. With all of todays safety features, we NEED to get in these cars and get their trim removed if we are doing any cutting or spreading.

    We have 2 disposable blankets as well, they are just quick and readily available and are going int the garbage so who really cares if they get glass in or on them as long as it doesn't go on the patient or the interior rescuer.

    Other than that, MM I think you got everything. Despite common opinion here, a few duplicates aren't bad. It allows 2 people to be doing the same thing on either side of the car at the same time or on 2 vehicles at the same time since 'most' vehicles in a multi-vehicle crash are in rather close proximity to each other

    Thanks for the placement idea though. Our front bumper compartment was poorly constructed for its intended use so it sits empty right now. That would be a good place to put our MVA tool bag.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FFTrainer
    Despite common opinion here, a few duplicates aren't bad. It allows 2 people to be doing the same thing on either side of the car at the same time or on 2 vehicles at the same time since 'most' vehicles in a multi-vehicle crash are in rather close proximity to each other

    Thanks for the placement idea though. Our front bumper compartment was poorly constructed for its intended use so it sits empty right now. That would be a good place to put our MVA tool bag.
    I agree that there is often similar work being done on two or more vehicles at the same time. I think for situations like those, 2 bags, stocked the same would be best. It would save lots of running back and forth.




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    Ok.. Phase 2 here... This compartment is not water tight, so can anyone suggest a bag that is water proof to some degree?

    To respond to some of the comments, I am inclined to duplicate a little for the aforementioned reasons, and also just to have a "back-up" for some tools that I feel are critical. I have seen center punches fail, so an alternate window tool makes sense. I have also seen a safety belt cutter not do the job, so the shears and/or rescue knife can back that up.

    Also... does anyone know what a "Double Battery Wrench" is and where you would buy one? I agree that when the chips are down, we will just cut battery cables... but if it is a routine "walking wounded" call, we prefer to unbolt the battery so that if the car is not totalled, it will save the vicitim (or the insurance carrier) the expense of replacing the cables.
    Last edited by MetalMedic; 01-11-2006 at 06:03 PM.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fireman4949
    I agree that there is often similar work being done on two or more vehicles at the same time. I think for situations like those, 2 bags, stocked the same would be best. It would save lots of running back and forth.
    Wait a minute, wait just one cotton pickin' minute.... you don't want to duplicate tools, but you want to duplicate the bags instead?!?!

    I'm just bustin you. I understand what your saying. We have contemplated a bag on each side of the rig for 2 reasons. 1 being it stands a better chance of being on the side you need it . Second it would keep a little of the clutter down in the bag so you don't have to dig as much for what you are looking for.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by MetalMedic
    Also... does anyone know what a "Double Battery Wrench" is and where you would buy one? I agree that when the chips are down, we will just cut battery cables... but if it is a routine "walking wounded" call, we prefer to unbolt the battery so that if the car is not totalled, it will save the vicitim (or the insurance carrier) the expense of replacing the cables.
    LOL BTDT

    Insurance Company: "The car was not totaled. Please pay $$$$$$ to replace the "wiring harness" after you cut it."

    ... which turned into a paranoia about cutting cables no matter what. But that's a thread we've already had on here.
    ANYWAY

    I believe we got our wrenches from NAPA... the GM terminal wrench has a ratchet in it, and I think it's double-ended... not sure at the moment though. I think we also have a couple of sizes of open-end wrenches that fit the other size terminals too.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Resq14
    LOL BTDT

    Insurance Company: "The car was not totaled. Please pay $$$$$$ to replace the "wiring harness" after you cut it."

    ... which turned into a paranoia about cutting cables no matter what. But that's a thread we've already had on here.
    ANYWAY
    Well.. for what it is worth, the former Fire Chief from a neighboring department works in the body shop at a major auto dealer in town. He is the one that has carried the flag for using some common sense when dealing with battery connections since he has seen first hand how cut cables adds unnecessary costs to the repair jobs he sees. Just like you "try before you pry", why would you want to destroy the property when you can accomplish the same task in a reasonable amount of time using the method designed to do the task? As I said, if it is a bad call, you cut the cables and move on (thus the reason to carry cable cutters in the kit). However, if it is just a "fender-bender" type call, there is no rush to disconnect the battery, but you still need to perform that task to eliminate potential hazards that do not currently exist.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

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    Quote Originally Posted by MetalMedic
    Well.. for what it is worth, the former Fire Chief from a neighboring department works in the body shop at a major auto dealer in town. He is the one that has carried the flag for using some common sense when dealing with battery connections since he has seen first hand how cut cables adds unnecessary costs to the repair jobs he sees. Just like you "try before you pry", why would you want to destroy the property when you can accomplish the same task in a reasonable amount of time using the method designed to do the task? As I said, if it is a bad call, you cut the cables and move on (thus the reason to carry cable cutters in the kit). However, if it is just a "fender-bender" type call, there is no rush to disconnect the battery, but you still need to perform that task to eliminate potential hazards that do not currently exist.
    Isn't that what the "big box" is for?

    If you have the time to do that, then it's not that big of an emergency. Just get the full tool box out of the compartment.

    I agree. Don't destroy something unnecessarily, but I understood the question to be about a kit for immediate intervention where time is of the essence.




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    Quote Originally Posted by fireman4949
    Isn't that what the "big box" is for?

    If you have the time to do that, then it's not that big of an emergency. Just get the full tool box out of the compartment.
    I know that... and you know that... but our guys are more likely to use what they have rather than walk back to the truck. The tool box on the rig is a BIG shop tool box that takes up half of a slide-out rear compartment... it would take 2 firefighters to carry the thing. It is more of a tool box that carries a large array of tools that you can pick and choose in instead of the basics that you need to get routine things accomplished.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

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    We carry a heavy duty canvas bag in the crew compartment with:
    Cable cutters
    Terminal pullers
    Window web spray
    Center punches
    Glass master
    Pliers
    Long screwdriver
    Duct tape
    Razor knife (box cutter)
    Seat belt cutters
    EMT shears.
    Tire deflators / inflators

    It goes to the car with first out firefighter to start mitigating hazards and contains all the small items that we use on a wreck and want to keep in one place.

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