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  1. #1
    Forum Member IGotTheJumpSeat's Avatar
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    Default Has anyone ever seen this before?

    We got dispatched to a bedroom and contents fire the other day. Two story farm house, heavy smoke and flames showing from the charlie side upon arival. A rookie and I jumped off grabing the attack line and headed for the front door. Now this rookie has never seen a uncontrolled burn up untill now, this was going to be his first and I could tell he was pumped up. We get to the door, I blead off the air and handed him the pipe, he was super stoked. We make entry and head up the staircase, fire room is straight back at the top of the stairs. We get to the doorway and he FREEZES, just stairing at the flames like there mezmerizing him as they roll over the ceeling, and our heads. I had to scream at him three times "crack the F'n pipe man!" only when I smacked him on the back he began supression.

    Now I always use the light of the fire to do a quick scan of the area, checking for possible vic's and taking a mental picture of the room before I crack the pipe, but I mean quick.

    I was wondering if anyone else has seen this before? BTW, once he finally got going he did a great job.


  2. #2
    FIREMAN 1st GRADE E40FDNYL35's Avatar
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    cut him some slack....after all it was his first
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  3. #3
    Forum Member IGotTheJumpSeat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by E40FDNYL35
    cut him some slack....after all it was his first
    Aw, he's not catching anything from me, he did a great job. I was just curious if theres a term people use for this "mezmerization by fire" thing. LOL

  4. #4
    Forum Member HeavyRescueTech's Avatar
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    he's a rookie. it's his first fire. you got to cut him (or her) some slack.

    also keep in mind, this is a HUGE different between a controlled burn in a burn building and working fire. he'd never seen it before, maybe it was like "oooo, ahhh, wow, so this is what a fire is." you also have his experience (the hay or propane is burning) vs now, where the walls themselves are burning, you got flames rolling overhead. it's different.

    don't stress it, it was probably because it was his first, I doubt it will happen in the future.
    If my basic HazMat training has taught me nothing else, it's that if you see a glowing green monkey running away from something, follow that monkey!

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  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber cdemarse's Avatar
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    hell look at the bright side atleast he didnt freeze at the front door so you couldnt make an attack at all.
    "Train as if your life depends on it"
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  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber nozzelvfd's Avatar
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    all of us did something as rookies at our first fire. Tis why you have veterans with them. For me it sucked because the very first uncontrolled fire I saw as a certified firefighter was a vehicle fire. Seeing flames shoot 10 - 15 feet in the area was still awsome. Watching the middle aged lady cry because her vehicle was on fire wasnt though. Of course when I finally did get to see a working structure it was amazing, certanly didnt look like the training fires.....LOL!!!

    P.S. AS we are 100% volunteer department and we do not let rookies or newbies on the nozz until after 6 months experince. They do however carry irons and back up the nozz-man to get experince and see how it is done.
    You need only two tools: WD-40 and duct tape. If it doesn't move and it should, use WD-40. If it moves and shouldn't, use the duct tape.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by nozzelvfd
    P.S. AS we are 100% volunteer department and we do not let rookies or newbies on the nozz until after 6 months experince. They do however carry irons and back up the nozz-man to get experince and see how it is done.
    Here the new guy usually gets the pipe for the first fire after he gets there. Best way to learn is to jump right in. After that he can wait his turn like everyone else! I have never seen anyone freeze like that but I'm sure it's not a big deal considering his performance after he got going.

  8. #8
    Forum Member HeavyRescueTech's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nozzelvfd
    P.S. AS we are 100% volunteer department and we do not let rookies or newbies on the nozz until after 6 months experince. They do however carry irons and back up the nozz-man to get experince and see how it is done.
    slightly off topic, but our chief (volunteer as well) thinks exactly the opposite. he says the best place for the new guy or the guy you don't have confidence in is to put him right on the nozzle, with you behind him. this way 1) you always know where he is 2) you can direct him in what to do 3) he's not going to bail on you. plus, as IGOT said, you can hit him in the back of the helmet if he freezes to get him back on track.
    If my basic HazMat training has taught me nothing else, it's that if you see a glowing green monkey running away from something, follow that monkey!

    FF/EMT/DBP

  9. #9
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    I did the same thing in my first good burner. I didn't need to be "snapped" out of it though. Just froze for a second, said "holy f*ckballs batman", and went at it.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrParasite
    slightly off topic, but our chief (volunteer as well) thinks exactly the opposite. he says the best place for the new guy or the guy you don't have confidence in is to put him right on the nozzle, with you behind him. this way 1) you always know where he is 2) you can direct him in what to do 3) he's not going to bail on you. plus, as IGOT said, you can hit him in the back of the helmet if he freezes to get him back on track.

    Here, you get the pipe for your first full year. Even if it's another company's fire, you get to the front, yell "Trial man" (our term for probie), and the guy on the nozzle is supposed to give you the line and take your tool in exchange. Like with DrParasite's department, there is always a senior man or officer with the sub, so if the he gets mesmerized, the experienced member does exactly what JumpSeat did and snaps him out of it.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by DetroitFF
    Here, you get the pipe for your first full year. Even if it's another company's fire, you get to the front, yell "Trial man" (our term for probie), and the guy on the nozzle is supposed to give you the line and take your tool in exchange. Like with DrParasite's department, there is always a senior man or officer with the sub, so if the he gets mesmerized, the experienced member does exactly what JumpSeat did and snaps him out of it.
    I doubt you could ever get that to fly here. Hell, its hard enough to get the guys on your own platoon to let you get the tip. My side, your side works best. Of course dont be slow, cause then it doesnt matter what side its on. And I dont care if youre GOD, youre not getting my tip!
    Just another one of the 99%ers looking up.

  12. #12
    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
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    Had a guy with me a few years ago, as we go in, I have him on the nozzle and I'm backing him up. We need to go upstairs to second floor. He hands me the nozzle and says "Go ahead, you lead". I get to top of stairs (which were just inside the front entrance), turn around, he's nowhere to be seen. I could see other guys at the bottom of the stairs and since I could go no further, I stayed. When I came out of the building, he runs up and hugs me telling how scared he was. It's taken some time and lots of training/drilling, but he is much better now.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  13. #13
    MembersZone Subscriber MrYuk's Avatar
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    To me, it is common practice to give the probie the nozzle for the same reasons DrParastie noted. I have seen many of probies freeze and just stare at the fire. Have to admit seeing fire roll over your head covering an entire ceiling is an experience not too many get to actually look at. Of course when you see it for the first time, you will be in awe. Nothing wrong with it your first time, as long as he did his job.
    "Training doesn't make you a good fireman, fighting fire makes you a good fireman"
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  14. #14
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    If after the third or fourth fire he continues to delay, I would start to worry. Maybe he just needs a jump start every time, but some day this could be catastrophic. If the room is about to flash and rather than turn and run, he freezes... That would be bad. Maybe someone should talk to him and ask him what exactly was happening. That may explain a lot.

  15. #15
    Forum Member FireCapt1951retired's Avatar
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    As DetroitFF wrote. We always give the pipe to a trial firefighter. After the academy (4 months) they get assigned to an engine company. During the trial period (8 months) in house the trialman does 6 months on an engine then is assigned to a ladder truck for 2 months (they don't get the pipe during this time). This gives them the best of both worlds during their trial period. I can't recall ever having a trialman litterally freeze on me though. They do tend to go through their air rapidly until they learn to calm down and and pace themselves. Most are a little apprehensive at first but the more time they get on the pipe the more confident and efficient they become. The same is true for their truck service. They are always backed up by the officer and/or a senior firefighter ( top 100 in seniority).
    Last edited by FireLt1951; 01-09-2006 at 12:38 PM.

  16. #16
    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
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    Interesting, we try to get our most experienced guy on the nozzle initially. If he feels like it, he can later pass the nozzle to the less experienced and let them get some time. I'd rather the guy on the nozzle know what he's doing for initial attack and let the new guy get experience after the main knockdown....especially if I'm on the floor above searching.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    We do pretty much as Bones just described. It all just depends on the amount of fire and the number of senior men on the fire. If we have a lack of senior men then the ones we do have will be detailed out to Safety/Accountability and the like. We do try to keep a senior man with a very new guy so he doesn't get in a position he can't get out of.
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  18. #18
    MembersZone Subscriber E229Lt's Avatar
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    "Did it look at you? Did the fire look at you? It did. Whoa. Wow. Our worlds aren't that far apart after all, are they? So, whoever is doing this knows that animal well, don't they? They know him real well, but they won't let him loose. They won't let him have any fun. Now who doesn't love fire? See... that wasn't such a long trip after all."

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by E229Lt
    "Did it look at you? Did the fire look at you? It did. Whoa. Wow. Our worlds aren't that far apart after all, are they? So, whoever is doing this knows that animal well, don't they? They know him real well, but they won't let him loose. They won't let him have any fun. Now who doesn't love fire? See... that wasn't such a long trip after all."
    HAHAH

    Ah....good old Ronald.

    "Go ahead Ronald, tell him..tell him what did when you got bored Ronald."
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  20. #20
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    How did you react on your first JOB. Sounds like you were able to get him back on track and take care of business. Now, when he becomes experienced and starts teaching probies he will remember what you taught him and what it was like for his first fire. I agree with the others he's new give him break, but it's also ok to rub it in during (SIGNAL 1- DINNER). Stay Safe!!!!!!!!!!!

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