Thread: New Driver

  1. #1
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    Default New Driver

    Hi, i'm an going to be training to become an ambulance driver for a volunteer unit in roughly 2 weeks and was wondering what i would be expecting during this training?

    I tried doing a search but didnt have much luck.

    Any info that i could read up before training would be great.

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    The only thing that I can think of to get you a head start is to get a copy of the motor vehicle laws in your state. There you can learn what emergency vehicles can and can not do while running "code". No matter what the law book says, follow the guidelines set forth by your service.

    Just relax and let them teach you what you need to know.
    Just someone trying to help! (And by the way....Thanks for YOUR help!)

    Aggressive does not have to equal stupid.

    ** "The comments made here are this person's views and possibly that of the organizations to which I am affiliated" **

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    I`m in the fire and rescue we go to lot of senes and the ems needs a driver to drive the ambulance to the hospital i do most of the time we were trainned to drive all emergency vehicals your looking for a great time so take adventage of it,I love driving. and i know you will to. Nothing to it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hurst1
    I`m in the fire and rescue we go to lot of senes and the ems needs a driver to drive the ambulance to the hospital i do most of the time we were trainned to drive all emergency vehicals your looking for a great time so take adventage of it,I love driving. and i know you will to. Nothing to it.
    Hi, I beg to differ with you. There is alot to driving an emergency vehicle. just getting behind to wheel and driving fast with lights and sirens is not how to do it. Each emergency vehicle has different characteristics. Whether it be weight distribution or breaking systems, you must know what your vehicle can and can not do in different situations.

    Saying that you have been trained on "ALL" emergency vehicles sounds a little far fetched. Maybe you have been trained on all the vehicles in your department. I am not saying this to be mean. I just wanted to point out that driving an emergency vehicle is a serious and dangerous occupation and shouldn't be taken lightly.

    You might be a highly qualified EVO, but you shouldn't mislead anyone that it is all fun and games. Just my humble opinion.
    Just someone trying to help! (And by the way....Thanks for YOUR help!)

    Aggressive does not have to equal stupid.

    ** "The comments made here are this person's views and possibly that of the organizations to which I am affiliated" **

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    The driver/operator is the most important position on the company. If you don't get there you can't help anyone. As we have seen in countless LODD, driving is a huge responsibility. You have the life of the 2 or 3 other guys in your hands.
    Learn your state and jurisdictions rules, always drive like everyone is out to get you, never assume that they can see or here us and you should be OK with time. Know your rig, just because you drive an engine doesn't make you an expert in all engines.
    The longer you drive the more this will sink in. If your jurisdiction is congested you may very well dislike driving, because of the stress involved.
    Good Luck

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    As a medic in the back of the box, you have someone's life in your hands. As the driver, you have MANY lives in your hands!

    Once you've take your EVOC course, don't think your now invincible! You still have tons to learn. Drive like it's your family in every other car on the road. Confidence will come with experience, but never out-drive your skills.




    Kevin
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    Quote Originally Posted by fireman4949
    Once you've take your EVOC course, don't think your now invincible! You still have tons to learn. Drive like it's your family in every other car on the road. Confidence will come with experience, but never out-drive your skill
    Kevin
    All too true... The one thing to keep in mind is you do no good if you don't make it to the scene in one piece. Becoming a statistic or worse, injuring fellow firefighters or civilians makes additional calls, spreads manpower thinner and can also get you locked up... or sued... or dead.

    Keep your head on straight, THINK, and remember that being in the left seat with all the noisemakers and red-n-blikies in the world does not give you the right to be a hazard. Be ever cautious, because if an accident occurs you're going to be the prime target of every ambulance chasing shark that can pass out a business card.

    And last but not least, driving like the hammers of hell just don't get it... It's damaging to the apparatus, yourself, your fellow responders and the pocketbook. Remember the term DUE REGARD.... You'll see this material again.

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    One other thing I might bring up in regards to your medic and patient in the back....be smooth. Nothing I hate more than an driver that jams brakes or makes hard turns while I'm trying to get an IV or something. Easy and smooth on the brakes and accellerator. Slow down before the corner and smoothly accellerate coming out. Any time you approach an intersection or vehicles, get out of the gas and get ready to slow down or stop if need be. The less your rock and lunge the truck, the better ride everyone in the back will have.

    Communication is nice, too. If you see trouble ahead or need to make an abrupt stop or turn, let him know as soon as possible, hopefully before the maneuver.

    Anyone ever have a trainer that set a cup of coffee or water on the cot and make you drive around trying to keep from spilling any?
    Last edited by Catch22; 03-29-2006 at 09:08 PM.

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    capfiremedic
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch22
    Anyone ever have a trainer that set a cup of coffee or water on the cot and make you drive around trying to keep from spilling any?
    I cmae up in the Cadillac days... and the boss used to put a cup of mud on the rear step while you took a "leasurely"drive about town....

    Then back at the barn he'd get the cup, if it was still there, just to make the point about transporting people. It got the idea across fast.

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    Default a little more

    I would like to add that you should get used to the idea of checking your rig out to make sure it is road worthy and get to know the feel of it and if you switch units get to know that one before going on the road.

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    Default driver/operator the most important?

    Quote Originally Posted by ADSNWFLD
    The driver/operator is the most important position on the company. If you don't get there you can't help anyone.



    This response bothers me. The driver/operator is important, but no one function is more important than any other. Yes it is true that you can't get there you can't help anyone, but you can't help them if you pull up with this big shiny vehicle lights & siren blaring and all you do is park there. I know this is a canned saying but "there is no I in team".

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    Quote Originally Posted by mach158
    Hi, i'm an going to be training to become an ambulance driver for a volunteer unit in roughly 2 weeks and was wondering what i would be expecting during this training?

    I tried doing a search but didnt have much luck.

    Any info that i could read up before training would be great.
    As an operator / chauffeur of fire apparatus for 25 years and also an instructor in apparatus driving, trust me, driving an emergency vehicle, either in normal modes or Code 2 or 3, DO NOT TAKE THIS RESPONSIBILITY LIGHTLY!!!

    To start with, you're on the right track, take as much training as you can in this field. Even after 25 years I still take in service training in apparatus operations.

    #1 - Look up the motor vehicle and traffic laws of your state, or any state you will be operating the emergency vehicle in. Learn what is an emergency vehicle, what "emergency mode" is, what an "emergency" is? Transporting a person with a sprained finger, or transporting any number of persons who today use the ambulance as a means of transportation to the hospital - DOES NOT CONSTITUTE AN EMERGENCY - and you should in your normal mode - Code 1.

    Todays emergency vehicles, including ambilances, are top heavy and they can and will overturn, very easily. I belong to an email service and there is seldom a day I don't read about an overturned emergency vehicle.

    Speed kills. On an average distance of 2-4 miles from quarters to the scene of the call, exceeding the speed limit, say from 30 MPH to 50 MPH only saves you seconds!!!. Time is saved by not having to wait at stop signs / red traffic signals, so after being properly trained in the proper manner in proceeding through an intersection, you will save time, but again, not that much. You must constantly weigh the pros and cons of your decisions.

    Two of the most important: Learn what "Due caution" means under your state laws. You must ALWAYS exercise "due caution" when operating the emergency vehicle.

    and secondly, You, the driver, are in charge of that vehicle. Not the officer sitting in the passenger side. If you have a collision, and God forbid you injured or killed someone, you will be the one sitting on the stand and have to answer for the manner in which you were operating the vehicle.

    Again, you're on the right track. Get as much training before you begine to operate the apparatus.

    Contact your local training center, contact adjoining ambulance services and fire departments, to see if you can obtain a copy of their training programs.

    If you have any questions, or would like a copy of some of the apparatus training material I have, email me and I'll get it to you.

    Drive safely,

    MCrean@optonline.net

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